444 episodes

A collection of public lectures either given at, or by members of, the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.

Cambridge Law: Public Lectures from the Faculty of Law Cambridge University

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A collection of public lectures either given at, or by members of, the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.

    • video
    'Government by decree - Covid-19 and the Constitution': The 2020 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture

    'Government by decree - Covid-19 and the Constitution': The 2020 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture

    On 27 October 2020 Lord Sumption delivered the 2020 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture entitled "Government by decree - Covid-19 and the Constitution".

    The disputes over Brexit last year saw an attempt to make the executive, not Parliament, the prime source of authority in the Constitution. The coronavirus crisis has provoked another attempt to marginalise Parliament, this time with the willing acquiescence of the House of Commons. Is this to be our future?

    Lord Sumption is an author, historian and lawyer of note. He was appointed directly from the practising Bar to the Supreme Court, and served as a Supreme Court Justice from 2012-18. In 2019, he delivered the BBC Reith Lectures, "Law and the Decline of Politics", and is now a regular commentator in the media. He continues to sit as a Non-Permanent Judge of the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal. Alongside his career as a lawyer, he has also produced a substantial and highly-regarded narrative history of the Hundred Years' War between England and France (with volume V still to come).

    More information about this lecture, including a transcript, is available from the Private Law Centre website:

    https://www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/CambridgeFreshfieldsLecture

    • 1 hr 16 min
    'Government by decree - Covid-19 and the Constitution': The 2020 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture (audio)

    'Government by decree - Covid-19 and the Constitution': The 2020 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture (audio)

    On 27 October 2020 Lord Sumption delivered the 2020 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture entitled "Government by decree - Covid-19 and the Constitution".

    The disputes over Brexit last year saw an attempt to make the executive, not Parliament, the prime source of authority in the Constitution. The coronavirus crisis has provoked another attempt to marginalise Parliament, this time with the willing acquiescence of the House of Commons. Is this to be our future?

    Lord Sumption is an author, historian and lawyer of note. He was appointed directly from the practising Bar to the Supreme Court, and served as a Supreme Court Justice from 2012-18. In 2019, he delivered the BBC Reith Lectures, "Law and the Decline of Politics", and is now a regular commentator in the media. He continues to sit as a Non-Permanent Judge of the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal. Alongside his career as a lawyer, he has also produced a substantial and highly-regarded narrative history of the Hundred Years' War between England and France (with volume V still to come).

    More information about this lecture, including a transcript, is available from the Private Law Centre website:

    https://www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/CambridgeFreshfieldsLecture

    This entry provides an audio source for iTunes.

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The Prisons' (audio)

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The Prisons' (audio)

    In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.

    In this second webinar we look at the current conditions in English prisons and explore why more has not been done for those in custody throughout the pandemic.

    At the beginning of April, the government announced plans for the early release of up to 4,000 prisoners in England and Wales, to reduce prison overcrowding and to slow the rate of infection among prisoners and staff. The Prison Governors Association and Public Health England argued that releasing 10,000 - 15,000 prisoners was needed. By late April, though, a mere 33 prisoners had been released. What went wrong? What has happened throughout May? What have been the implications for the welfare/health/progression of both prisoners and staff? What are the lessons to be learnt now, and for the future - within the prison and probation systems?

    Discussing the issues:

    Chair: Nicky Padfield, Professor of Criminal and Penal Justice

    Nicky is joined by a panel of experts:

    - Andrea Albutt (President, Prison Governors Association);
    - Richard Garside (Director, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies);
    - Laura Janes (Legal Director, Howard League for Penal Reform);
    - (Retired) Judge John Samuels QC (ex-Parole Board and President, Prisoners' Education Trust); and
    - Jessie Smith (Cambridge PhD candidate in Law, solicitor, formerly specialising in national security).

    This entry provides an audio source.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    • video
    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The Prisons'

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The Prisons'

    In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.

    In this second webinar we look at the current conditions in English prisons and explore why more has not been done for those in custody throughout the pandemic.

    At the beginning of April, the government announced plans for the early release of up to 4,000 prisoners in England and Wales, to reduce prison overcrowding and to slow the rate of infection among prisoners and staff. The Prison Governors Association and Public Health England argued that releasing 10,000 - 15,000 prisoners was needed. By late April, though, a mere 33 prisoners had been released. What went wrong? What has happened throughout May? What have been the implications for the welfare/health/progression of both prisoners and staff? What are the lessons to be learnt now, and for the future - within the prison and probation systems?

    Discussing the issues:

    Chair: Nicky Padfield, Professor of Criminal and Penal Justice

    Nicky is joined by a panel of experts:

    - Andrea Albutt (President, Prison Governors Association);
    - Richard Garside (Director, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies);
    - Laura Janes (Legal Director, Howard League for Penal Reform);
    - (Retired) Judge John Samuels QC (ex-Parole Board and President, Prisoners' Education Trust); and
    - Jessie Smith (Cambridge PhD candidate in Law, solicitor, formerly specialising in national security).

    • 1 hr 2 min
    • video
    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The courts'

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The courts'

    In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.

    In the first event, our focus is the courts and we explore the reality of daily life in magistrates’ courts and in the Crown Court, from bail applications to sentencing. What has happened to the right to trial by jury? What will be the impact of the pandemic on the rights of defendants and victims, both in the short and the long term? What are the lessons to be learnt from video-justice? Could HMCTS and the judiciary have been better prepared?

    Discussing the issues:

    Chair: Nicky Padfield, Professor of Criminal and Penal Justice

    Nicky is joined by a panel of experts:

    - Amanda Pinto Q.C. (Chair of The Bar Council);
    - Simon Davis (President of The Law Society);
    - Ian Kelcey (Criminal Solicitor Advocate); and
    - Abimbola Johnson (Criminal Barrister).

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The courts' (audio)

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The courts' (audio)

    In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.

    In the first event, our focus is the courts and we explore the reality of daily life in magistrates’ courts and in the Crown Court, from bail applications to sentencing. What has happened to the right to trial by jury? What will be the impact of the pandemic on the rights of defendants and victims, both in the short and the long term? What are the lessons to be learnt from video-justice? Could HMCTS and the judiciary have been better prepared?

    Discussing the issues:

    Chair: Nicky Padfield, Professor of Criminal and Penal Justice

    Nicky is joined by a panel of experts:

    - Amanda Pinto Q.C. (Chair of The Bar Council);
    - Simon Davis (President of The Law Society);
    - Ian Kelcey (Criminal Solicitor Advocate); and
    - Abimbola Johnson (Criminal Barrister).

    This item provides an audio source.

    • 1 hr 1 min

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