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Golden Age of the Silver Screen – Movie House Memories Movie House Memories

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    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

    Gaumont British Picture Corporation of America released The Man Who Knew Too Much on December 1934. Alfred Hitchcock directed the film starring Leslie Banks, Edna Best, and Peter Lorre.

    ‘The Man Who Knew Too Much’ Plot Summary

    The Man Who Knew Too Much begins with Bob and Jill Lawrence getting more than they bargained for on a holiday in Switzerland. When someone shoots their friend Louis Bernard, his dying words are a request to Jill to get information hidden in his room to the British Consulate. However, once they get that information, someone kidnaps their little daughter, Betty. You see, Louis was a Foreign Office spy and the information he had outlines the assassination of a foreign dignitary. Once back in London, Bob sets out to bring his daughter back home alive. What he learns not only leads him straight to the kidnappers themselves, but Jill to a lovely concert at the Albert Hall. She quickly finds herself with a gut-wrenching choice that pits the life of the foreign dignitary against the life of her own daughter.

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    Disclaimer

    This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The song Hyperfun is brought to you by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of the Golden Age of the Silver Screen, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC unless otherwise noted.

    Good Morning / Ohayô (1959)

    Good Morning / Ohayô (1959)

    Shochiku released Good Morning / Ohayô on May 12, 1959. Yasujirô Ozu directed the film starring Keiji Sada, Yoshiko Kuga, and Chishû Ryû.

    ‘Good Morning / Ohayô’ Plot Summary

    Good Morning (Ohayo) is the story of two young boys in suburban Tokyo who take a vow of silence after their parents refuse to buy them a television set. Shot from the perspective of the petulant brothers, Good Morning is an enchantingly satirical portrait of family life that gives rise to gags about romance, gossip, and the consumerism of modern Japan during the late 1950’s.

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    Disclaimer

    This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The song Hyperfun is brought to you by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of the Golden Age of the Silver Screen, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC unless otherwise noted.

    Cluny Brown (1946)

    Cluny Brown (1946)

    Twentieth Century Fox released Cluny Brown on June 2, 1946. Ernst Lubitsch directed the film starring Charles Boyer, Jennifer Jones, and Peter Lawford.

    ‘Cluny Brown’ Plot Summary

    Ernst Lubistch’s last film production Cluny Brown is a charming satire and a non-conformists delight. Cluny (Jennifer Jones), a plumber’s niece who “doesn’t know her place,” meets Adam Belinksi (Charles Boyer) while unclogging the sink of a dull Englishman. Belinksi, a Czech philosopher with a con man’s rhetoric, encourages Cluny to make her own place in the world! To “feed squirrels to the nuts,” so to speak. Unfortunately for Cluny, she is sent to work as a maid at a stuffy country manor, where her outspoken and cheerfully undisciplined manner do not belong. Belinski arrives at the manor as a refugee guest hiding from the Nazis, and the two misfit characters make a pact to not fall in love.

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    Disclaimer

    This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The song Hyperfun is brought to you by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of the Golden Age of the Silver Screen, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC unless otherwise noted.

    Song of the South (1946)

    Song of the South (1946)

    RKO Radio Pictures released Song of the South on November 20, 1946. Harve Foster and Wilfred Jackson directed the film starring Ruth Warrick, Bobby Driscoll, and James Baskett.

    ‘Song of the South’ Plot Summary

    In this extremely controversial, but Academy Award winning film, young Johnny and his mother are sent to live on his grandmother’s plantation in the deep South some time after the American Civil War while his father remains in Atlanta. Once there, Johnny befriends Uncle Remus, one of the African American men living on the plantation, who helps guide him through life with his colorful stories about Br’er Rabbit, Br’er Fox, and Br’er Bear and their adventures in the woods near the Briar Patch.

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    Disclaimer

    This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The song Hyperfun is brought to you by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of the Golden Age of the Silver Screen, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC unless otherwise noted.

    Doctor X (1932)

    Doctor X (1932)

    arner Bros. released Doctor X to theaters on August 27, 1932. Michael Curtiz directed the film which starred Lionel Atwill, Fay Wray, and Lee Tracy.

    ‘Doctor X’ Movie Summary

    In Doctor X, Lee Taylor is a reporter investigating a serial murderer in New York City who only seems to kill at night during a full moon. Each victim is strangled to death before a surgical scalpel slices the back of their head, and the killer eats part of their brain. The only witness descriptions of the killer is one of a horribly disfigured monster.

    After the latest victim is found, the police take the corpse to Doctor Xavier for an autopsy and his medical opinion on the matter. However, the police reveal they have an ulterior motive for bringing the victim there. They have somehow discovered that the scalpel used to slice open each victim is only used at Xavier’s medical institution. In addition to that, all the victims were killed nearby.

    Dr. Xavier introduces the police to the other professors who work at his laboratory. There is Dr. Wells who studies cannibalism, but the police rule him out as a suspect because his left hand has been amputated; making a strangulation nearly impossible. Dr. Haines seems to be something of a pervert as the group walks in on him in the dark with a dirty magazine.







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    Leave a Comment and Follow Us

    Please let us know what you think of the film in the comments section, and rate this movie from one to five stars below as well. If there is a film you’d like us to review, send us an email at comments@moviehousememories.com with your name, location, and film choice. And finally, if you are of the social media persuasion, you can look Movie House Memories up on Twitter or Pinterest, and if you do, please give us a follow when you find us.

    Disclaimer



    This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The song Hyperfun is brought to you by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of the Golden Age of the Silver Screen, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC unless otherwise noted.

    Affiliate links contained in this post will take you to Amazon.com and/or the iTunes Store. This means when you click a link, and purchase an item, the MHM Podcast Network will receive an affiliate commission. Advertisers and Affiliate Partnerships do not influence our content. See our Terms of Use about the inclusion of affiliate links on this site for more information.

    Road to Morocco (1942)

    Road to Morocco (1942)

    Paramount Pictures released Road to Morocco to theaters on April 8, 1942. David Butler directed the film which starred Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, and Dorothy Lamour.

    ‘Road to Morocco’ Movie Summary

    Road to Morocco begins with the explosion of a freighter out at sea. News spreads across the world over its destruction. While the cause of the ship’s explosion is unknown, the entire crew is accounted for sans two unidentified stowaways.

    The men, Jeff Peters and Orville ‘Turkey’ Jackson, float adrift at sea on a piece of the ship’s wreckage. Jeff was the one whose bright idea it was to stow away, but it was Orville’s smoking that caused the mighty explosion, and got them into their current predicament.

    They eventually hit land, and while they sit on the beach, Orville reminds Jeff that he promised Aunt Lucy to take care of him, but really, Aunt Lucy died before Jeff could agree. As they talk, a random camel walks over to them from out of nowhere, and kiss them over and over. When the boys realize who the real kisser it, they hitch a ride on the camel down the road to Morocco.

     







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    Please let us know what you think of the film in the comments section, and rate this movie from one to five stars below as well. If there is a film you’d like us to review, send us an email at comments@moviehousememories.com with your name, location, and film choice. And finally, if you are of the social media persuasion, you can look Movie House Memories up on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and if you do, please give us a follow when you find us.

    Disclaimer



    This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The song Hyperfun is brought to you by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of the Golden Age of the Silver Screen, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC unless otherwise noted.

    Affiliate links contained in this post will take you to Amazon.com and/or the iTunes Store. This means when you click a link, and purchase an item, the MHM Podcast Network will receive an affiliate commission. Advertisers and Affiliate Partnerships do not influence our content. See our Terms of Use about the inclusion of affiliate links on this site for more information.

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