20 episodes

Michelle Grattan talks politics with politicians and experts, from Capital Hill.

Politics with Michelle Grattan Michelle Grattan

    • News

Michelle Grattan talks politics with politicians and experts, from Capital Hill.

    Adam Bandt on Greens' hopes for future power sharing

    Adam Bandt on Greens' hopes for future power sharing

    Adam Bandt began his political journey in the Labor party, but the issue of climate change drew him to the Greens. Last week he became their leader, elected unopposed.
    Asked about his ambitions for the party, Bandt aspires to a power-sharing situation with a Labor government, akin to the Gillard era.
    "Ultimately Labor's got to decide where it stands, and if Labor decides that it does want to go down the path of working with us on a plan to phase out coal and look after workers in communities, then great.
    "If Labor prefers to work with the Liberals, maybe we're going to see a situation like we do in Germany at the moment where there's a grand coalition between the equivalent of the Labor and Liberal parties because they find that they've got more in common with each other than with us."
    Additional audio:
    A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive.
    Image:
    AAP/Mick Tsikas

    • 29 min
    Michael McCormack moves on from his near-death experience

    Michael McCormack moves on from his near-death experience

    Starting the year with a leadership spill will be seen by many, especially those hit by the bushfires, as the Nationals being particularly self-indulgent.
    Nationals leader and Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack admits as much, but notes he wasn’t the initiator of his party’s bad behaviour.
    “We should not have been talking about ourselves. This was never of my making or doing. And we should have spent the entire day, not just those sitting hours, but the entire day reflecting on just what has taken place this summer,” he tells the Politics podcast.
    McCormack also says he supported Bridget McKenzie “the whole way” through the sports rorts controversy and he again stands by her decision-making.
    The National leader defends his new frontbench line up against criticism that it’s short on women, mounts a strong pitch in favour of coal, and rejects claims he’s been too invisible and a weak leader.
    Additional audio:
    A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive.
    Image:
    Mick Tsikas/AAP

    • 22 min
    Mathias Cormann and Jim Chalmers on the mid-year budget update

    Mathias Cormann and Jim Chalmers on the mid-year budget update

    The mid-year budget update has seen the government downgrading its forecast for Australia’s economic growth in 2019-20 by 0.25%, and slashing the projected surplus by A$2.1 billion, to $5 billion. The forecast for wage growth has also been reduced, and unemployment is projected to be slightly higher than was envisaged at budget time.
    The figures indicate a worsening economy, but the government has sought to put a positive spin on the situation, saying the Australian economy is showing resilience.
    Joining this podcast is finance minister Mathias Cormann and shadow treasurer Jim Chalmers to talk about the figures and the outlook.
    Additional audio:
    A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive.
    Image:
    The Conversation

    • 21 min
    Andrew Hastie on foreign influence, security and veteran mental health

    Andrew Hastie on foreign influence, security and veteran mental health

    Chinese government influence and interference has been a contentious issue in Australia politics in the past year.
    Weighing up concerns about foreign money in state and federal campaigns, candidates’ direct relationships with arms of the Chinese Communist Party and the defection of a Chinese spy operating within Australia, against the fragile trade relationship we have with our largest export market has been one of the more difficult topics for both major parties.
    Andrew Hastie, Liberal member for the seat of Canning, is one of the most outspoken government members on the issue of foreign interference.
    He’s used his position as a backbencher – and as chair of the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security – to speak openly about his concerns and what he sees as the expansion of “revisionist” countries trying to “remake the world order … pushing out to secure their economic and strategic influence beyond their geographical borders”.
    He also talks about why he thinks it would be untenable to have security clearance for every member of parliament, the role of the media in scrutinising candidates, and concerns about mental health among returned veterans.
    Additional audio: 
    A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive.
    Image:
    AAP/Lukas Coch

    • 25 min
    Minister David Littleproud on bushfires, drought, and the Nationals

    Minister David Littleproud on bushfires, drought, and the Nationals

    Bushfires continue to burn across NSW and Queensland, the death toll has risen, and the damage to properties, wildlife and the environment is devastating. With conditions predicted to worsen over the summer, climate change has inevitably come into the frame.
    The Prime Minister and Opposition leader have said policy arguments should be avoided until the immediate crisis has passed, but many - including former emergency chiefs and some victims - disagree. And Greens and Nationals have had vitriolic exchanges.
    The Nationals David Littleproud has ministerial responsibility for water, drought, and natural disaster and emergency management. In this podcast, he says while “the man on the street” can link climate change and the bushfires, but “as elected officials, we’ve got a responsibility” to wait for the right time to have such discussions.
    After announcing the government’s drought package last week, Littleproud criticises the states for not stepping up their efforts, and says they have done “three-fifths of bugger all”.
    Additional audio: 
    A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive
    Image: 
    AAP/Dan Peled

    • 35 min
    Ross Gittins on the government’s ‘surplus obsession’

    Ross Gittins on the government’s ‘surplus obsession’

    The Australian economy is growing slowly, with people not opening their purses and businesses uncertain about the future.
    The Reserve Bank has cut interest rates three times this year - the official cash rate is currently at a historic low of 0.75%. Many are arguing monetary policy has run its course, and fiscal stimulus is needed. This week’s Essential poll shows voters tend to think so as well, with 56% agreeing that stimulating the economy should be prioritised over getting back to budget surplus.
    The Morrison government, however, is reluctant to do anything impinging on the projected surplus, which has become a political icon for it.
    How long can the government maintain this position if the growth numbers don’t improve? And does action need to be taken now? Joining Michelle Grattan to talk about these issues is Ross Gittins, economics editor of the Sydney Morning Herald.
    Additional audio:
    A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive.
    Image:
    AAP/ Mick Tsikas

    • 21 min

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