12 episodes

Startups: Digitalization to Realization is a podcast series where we interview startup owners about their journey to turn their idea into a reality and become the next industry leaders. Launching a startup is never an easy road. In this series, you will hear startup owners tell their story about how they got started, what inspires them, and how they are always striving to solve their challenges. Some startups were born in the pandemic and some are changing to adapt this uncertain time. All of them have a great story to tell. 
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Startups: Digitalization to Realization Siemens Digital Industry Software

    • Technology

Startups: Digitalization to Realization is a podcast series where we interview startup owners about their journey to turn their idea into a reality and become the next industry leaders. Launching a startup is never an easy road. In this series, you will hear startup owners tell their story about how they got started, what inspires them, and how they are always striving to solve their challenges. Some startups were born in the pandemic and some are changing to adapt this uncertain time. All of them have a great story to tell. 
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Closing the Gap: Aerodynamics and Environmental Impact with Deflect, LLC

    Closing the Gap: Aerodynamics and Environmental Impact with Deflect, LLC

    Big sweeping changes are hard to come by when it comes to environmental preservation. They also take a long time to settle into place. So, perhaps the real sustainability changes we’re seeking are those that come in smaller packages. It’s the less disruptive and more easily implemented solutions that are filling in the gaps, and those small efforts can add up quickly. 
    Today, I’m talking to Spencer Maynes, a Kansas City based inventor and data scientist working to reduce energy consumption in the transportation industry. He’s the CEO of Deflect, LLC, a company that’s introduced a system called RoofRider, a unique product that significantly improves the aerodynamics for transportation and passenger trains. We’ll also hear from the company CTO, Adrian Villar. 
    In this episode, you’ll learn how this deflector technology helps reduce drag in the inter-car gap, and how Deflect, LLC came up with such a unique solution to a long-known fuel efficiency problem in the rail industry. We’ll discuss the importance of testing and simulation, and how Siemens NX is helping throughout the design process. Finally, you’ll hear about the challenges they experienced and the support they benefited from as they launched the company, and the process of bringing their technology closer to market. 
    Some Questions I Ask:
    How does the product concept work? (3:38)Are there other companies creating similar products? (6:12)What's happening between the train cars as they're moving down the track? (12:06)What challenges do you anticipate from both a technical and a business perspective? (16:08)
    What You’ll Learn in This Episode:
    How the RoofRyder reduces fuel consumption on freight trains (2:36)A unique mission statement (4:46)Differences and similarities between the aerodynamics of race cars and trains (10:13)Risk management in the rail industry (18:08)
    Resources:
    RoofRider
    Connect with Spencer Maynes:
    LinkedIn
    Connect with Adrian Villar:
    LinkedIn
    Connect with Paul Musto:
    LinkedIn

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    • 23 min
    Beyond the Horizon: The Future of Gas Turbines with Sierra Turbines

    Beyond the Horizon: The Future of Gas Turbines with Sierra Turbines

    When it comes to getting an aircraft off the ground, it’s no longer a question of “if” it will fly. We’ve moved into the era of “how”- and the emphasis today is on efficiency. This encompasses energy consumption, endurance, speed, and overall performance. Today, we’re looking into the future of turbine engines and exploring what lies just beyond the horizon of existing technology. We’re looking towards what’s next. 
    Today, I’m talking to Roger Smith and David Laudermilch of Sierra Turbines. Roger started as a software engineer for Apple nearly 20 years ago, and today, he’s the CEO of this innovative California company. David is a Design Engineer with previous experience working with companies like Saab and Rolls Royce. Together, they’ve taken their experience working for industry leaders in software and transportation and turned towards the production of gas microturbines. 
    In this episode, you’ll hear how each of their rather unique career trajectories eventually led them to this Silicon Valley startup. We’ll talk about the early challenges of getting a microturbine company off the ground, the technologies that merge in order to create their products, and the interesting work they're doing in collaboration with NASA. 
    Some Questions I Ask:
    What makes your turbines unique? (4:07)What are the advantages of using additive for your microturbines? (5:16)What challenges did you face in the early stages of developing Sierra Turbines? (8:40)What drew you to Siemens and why do you prefer NX? (15:22)What's the first commercial application that you see? (21:17)
    What You’ll Learn in This Episode:
    How Sierra Turbines began (2:59)The link between microturbines and outer space (6:06)Preparing for the validation process (13:45)What’s on the horizon Sierra Turbines (19:21)Preparing for a zero-emissions future (23:50)
    Resources:
    Sierra Turbines
    Connect with Roger Smith:
    LinkedIn
    Connect with David Laudermilch:
    LinkedIn
    Connect with Paul Musto:
    LinkedIn

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    • 27 min
    Apollo Fusion and The Future of Satellite Propulsion

    Apollo Fusion and The Future of Satellite Propulsion

    The satellite business is growing rapidly as space technology and technology here on Earth advances. Whether it’s for navigation purposes or wifi accessibility, more and more satellites of all sizes and purposes are being launched into the great beyond. But, before they can fulfill their purpose, they have to hitch a ride to space. 
    My guest today is Dean Massey, Director of Research at Apollo Fusion, Inc. This California-based company is developing exciting new forms of propulsion for space satellites. In this rapidly growing industry, Apollo stands out because of their unique focus on the smaller satellite market. Their journey into space began in 2016 with fusion, and soon after transformed into propulsion as the market began to develop and show promise.
    In this episode, you’ll hear about the early days of this space-age startup, and more about the overall history of space satellites. We’ll talk about how the propulsion system functions as it simultaneously launches hundreds of small satellites, and the simulation aspects of recreating a space-like environment. You’ll also learn about the challenges they’ve faced as a startup in the space industry, and how they’ve surpassed them as they gear up for their first launch. 
    Some Questions I Ask:
    What’s the mission that you and your team have embarked on? (1:30)What is a Hall Thruster? (6:47)How does the propulsion system function on the satellite? (11:40)What makes Apollo thrusters unique (17:55)What are the future goals for the company? (22:28)What drew you to Siemens and the products that you use? (26:35)
    What You’ll Learn in This Episode:
    Why the Apollo focus is on the smaller satellite market (2:28)How the company shifted from fusion to propulsion (5:19)A short history of space satellites (7:53)How long it takes satellites to get to space (14:08)Why manufacturability makes Apollo different (20:01)
    Resources:
    Apollo Fusion
    Connect with Dean Massey:
    LinkedIn
    Connect with Paul Musto:
    LinkedIn

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    • 30 min
    Flying With Efficiency: The Future Air Freight with Aleksey Matyushev of Natilus Corporation

    Flying With Efficiency: The Future Air Freight with Aleksey Matyushev of Natilus Corporation

    How many times have you ordered something online, and received a box 4x the size of the product inside? Aside from the confusion as to why, we’re all left with the sentiment of how wasteful it is. Well, there’s one company out there working to change that. 
    Throughout the pandemic, e-commerce has taken off astronomically. That means the demand for smart and efficient air cargo solutions is on the rise. 
    My guest today is Aleksey Matyushev from Natilus Corporation, a California based startup working on creating autonomous drone aircraft. Their goal is to reduce the cost of airfreight by 50% through thoughtful design and a smarter use of space.  
    In this episode, Aleksey talks about how he pivoted from industrial design to entrepreneurship and shares details about the autonomous aircraft being produced by Natilus. He also shares valuable insight about the inner workings of Silicon Valley, and why aspiring entrepreneurs don’t necessarily need to flock there in order to find success.  
    Some Questions I Ask:
    How did you come up with the idea for Natilus? (3:28)Do you ever see this evolving into human transportation? (6:50)What was the process that you went through to validate the effectiveness of the designs? (10:39)How do you save money by flying at lower altitudes? (12:56)What can you share with other entrepreneurs about your startup experience? (15:25)What kinds of simulations is Natilus doing? (25:38)
    What You’ll Learn in This Episode:
    Why the F22 never went into major production (4:55)What makes Natilus stand out from the competition (7:58)Why making an electric aircraft is different from making an electric car (9:18)The creative strategy they used to help build the business (10:58)Why e-commerce was an important consideration in their design process (14:09)Lessons in product development (19:02)A message for aspiring entrepreneurs and engineers (27:26)
    Resources:
    Natilus
    Siemens Startups Program: from idea to market leader with the right tools
    Connect with Aleksey Matyushev:
    LinkedIn
    Connect with Paul Musto:
    LinkedIn

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    • 30 min
    Taking Flight with Ephi Blanshey of Blanshey Aviation

    Taking Flight with Ephi Blanshey of Blanshey Aviation

    If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to jump off of a mountain and glide uninhibited across the sky, today’s guest is bringing you one step closer to that reality. He believes that the current transportation options available limit our movement by confining us to land. Why drive when we could be flying?
    My guest today is Ephi Blanshey. He’s the younger half of the father and son duo behind Blanshey Aviation. They’re currently designing an electric propulsion system to improve the experience of lightweight flying for hang gliding machines. 
    In today’s episode, we’ll learn about the origins of these design ideas that originated with Ephi’s father, Vladimir. We’ll also talk about the reasons they’ve moved away from a combustion engine model, and how the newer electric engines benefit the design. 
    Ephi tells us about their CAD design and 3D printing tools, and names some of the helpful forums he’s found for anyone out there interested in using Solid Edge. Are you ready to take to the skies and enter the next generation of mobility? 
    Some Questions I Ask:
    What’s the origin of Blanshey Aviation? (1:24)When did the trike first appear as a recreational vehicle? (4:02)How was design approached in the early days? (7:47)How did you move into electric aviation? (10:31)What do the next 3-5 years look like for your company? (16:26)What online communities have you found to be the most useful? (20:41)How are you assembling the products you make? (23:42)
    What You’ll Learn in This Episode:
    The complex logistics of hang gliding (2:24)The problems associated with using a combustion engine to fly (6:27)How Blanshey uses Solid Edge (13:09)The unique challenges for this type of aviation (18:33)The 3D printer they use and how it’s modified as needed (21:57)How & where testing takes place (25:09)Advice to other entrepreneurs (26:28)
    Resources:
    Hacker NewsFacebook GroupsSolid Edge Community ForumSiemens Blog
    Connect with Ephi Blanshey:
    Email/ TwitterInstagram
    Connect with John Fox: 
    LinkedInTwitter
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    • 31 min
    Hatching the Companies of Tomorrow with Osh Momoh and Jesika Briones of MaRS

    Hatching the Companies of Tomorrow with Osh Momoh and Jesika Briones of MaRS

    The difference between starting a company 20+ years ago and starting one today is the accessibility of resources. When resources become more available, the competition grows. Great innovation needs professional nurturing in order to gain the competitive edge needed to survive in today’s startup environment. 
    Startup incubator spaces have answered this call for countless companies. They provide resources and professional expertise related to scaling a small business to companies at various stages of growth.
    In today’s episode, we're talking to Osh Momoh and Jesika Briones from the leadership team at MaRS. This Toronto-based incubator provides support and services to over 1,200 startup companies. They provide Canadian science and tech companies with tailored resources through the startup stages, focusing on health, cleantech, FinTech, financial, and enterprise. 
    MaRS has been helping startups get off the ground for 15 years, and they’re only seeing interest grow. They also offer a dedicated Autonomous program for startups in that realm, so we’ll dive into how that works as well. 
    Some Questions I Ask:
    Could you provide us with some background on MaRS and the overall mission that you have there? (1:57)What types of day to day services do you provide for startups? (4:12)How do you see that startup world changing? (8:23)Can you give us an example of a company that you've worked with at MaRS that have gone through that evolution and are now on their path to becoming a commercially successful company? (11:07)What is a level 5 autonomous vehicle, and when might that be commercially available? (21:27)What are some of the challenges autonomous vehicles face? (24:19)How do you see the infrastructure that’s required to support autonomous vehicles progressing? (27:58)
    What You’ll Learn in This Episode:
    The types of startups MaRS works with (2:44)How they’ve broadened their industry focus beyond the health sector (6:00)How MaRS has grown with the popularity of startup culture (9:23)The role of the Autonomous Vehicle Innovation Network within MaRS (13:56)What autonomous vehicle really means (7:10)Considerations for an autonomous future (22:13)
    Resources:
    MaRS
    Ecopia AI
    Automated Vehicle Transparency and Engagement for Safe Testing Initiative
    Siemens Startups Program: from idea to market leader with the right tools
    Connect with Osh Momoh:
    LinkedIn
    Connect with Jesika Briones:
    LinkedIn
    Connect with Paul Musto:
    LinkedIn

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    • 35 min

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