14 episodes

This podcast discusses recent research published in Tourism Geographies: An International Journal of Tourism Space, Place and Environment.
We talk with authors about their research contributions to share the why and how of their research.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Tourism Geographies Podcast Tourism Geographies

    • Leisure

This podcast discusses recent research published in Tourism Geographies: An International Journal of Tourism Space, Place and Environment.
We talk with authors about their research contributions to share the why and how of their research.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Samoan perceptions of travel and tourism mobilities – the concept of Malaga

    Samoan perceptions of travel and tourism mobilities – the concept of Malaga

    Stephen Pratt interviews Dawn Gibson about their research in Samoa.
    ABSTRACT
    Tourism is a global phenomenon yet non-Western travel and tourism mobilities are under-researched and lack theoretical development. In the South Pacific, a region which is increasingly receiving geopolitical attention, there is substantial knowledge of inbound tourism but outbound and domestic forms of travel are less known. To understand the travel and tourism mobilities of Samoans, a concurrent mixed methods design of surveys supplemented by interviews with both urban and rural Samoans was employed. Samoan understandings of travel and tourism are expressed via the concept of malaga, which has a range of meanings including ‘migration’, ‘movement’ or ‘travel back and forth’. For Samoans, travel was for cultural and familial purposes, including the maintenance of cultural bonds through fa’alavelave (traditional obligations) and visiting friends and relatives (VFR). The migration of Samoans to various Pacific countries such as Australia, New Zealand and the USA has generated more need for travel and has helped to make mobility a routine aspect of Samoan social life. The travel mobilities of both urban and rural Samoans were influenced by a mix of cultural and familial obligations, leisure and tourism goals, and work-related purposes, blurring the lines between tourism and other forms of mobility. This paper advances knowledge of Samoan forms of travel and tourism mobility, providing important insights into the travel practices of a Pacific Islander people at a time when the South Pacific is becoming a site of intensifying geopolitical competition.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 10 min
    Invited to Witness: Solidarity Tourism across Occupied Palestine

    Invited to Witness: Solidarity Tourism across Occupied Palestine

    In Invited to Witness, Jennifer Lynn Kelly explores the significance of contemporary solidarity tourism across Occupied Palestine. Examining the relationships among race, colonialism, and movement-building in spaces where tourism and military occupation operate in tandem, Kelly argues that solidarity tourism in Palestine functions as both political strategy and emergent industry. She draws from fieldwork on solidarity tours in Palestine/Israel and interviews with guides, organizers, community members, and tourists, asking what happens when tourism is marketed as activism and when anticolonial work functions through tourism. Palestinian organizers, she demonstrates, have refashioned the conventions of tourism by extending invitations to tourists to witness Palestinian resistance and the effects of Israeli state practice on Palestinian land and lives. In so doing, Kelly shows how Palestinian guides and organizers wrest from Israeli control the capacity to invite and the permission to narrate both their oppression and their liberation.
    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 19 min
    Heritage conservation and communities’ sense of deprivation in tourism: the case of the Hani community in Yunnan, China

    Heritage conservation and communities’ sense of deprivation in tourism: the case of the Hani community in Yunnan, China

    Jaeyeon Choe speaks with Daniel Olsen about his research
    Ce Qu, Chaozhi Zhang, Shiwei Shen & Daniel H. Olsen (2022) Heritage conservation and communities’ sense of deprivation in tourism: the case of the Hani community in Yunnan, China, Tourism Geographies, DOI: 10.1080/14616688.2021.2016936
    Abstract
    Communities play a critical role in the development and maintenance of sustainable heritage tourism. However, conflicts often arise when these communities are ignored or marginalized in the heritage tourism development process. This paper examines whether the community located within the Honghe Hani Rice Terraces, a World Heritage Site in China, views the designation and subsequent tourism development as beneficial or not. The findings show that there are significant differences in opinion between the local Hani people and non-Local Hani and outsiders who live in the heritage area. The local Hani feel a greater sense of deprivation due to de-empowerment and economic inequalities as compared with non-Local Hani and outsiders. This deprivation has reduced their motivation to conserve their own heritage, while the non-local Hani feel a greater sense of gain and a newfound appreciation for their personal and collective heritage identity. Frequent interactions between the two groups have led to local Hani people resisting the heritage preservation responsibilities enforced upon them.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 21 min
    From tents and maps to vans and apps: Exploring camping mobilities

    From tents and maps to vans and apps: Exploring camping mobilities

    Jamie Gillen interviews Niamh Espiner about her research on camping in New Zealand.
    You can reference it here:
    Niamh Espiner, Emma J. Stewart, Helen Fitt, Shannon Page & Stephen Espiner (2021) From tents and maps to vans and apps: Exploring camping mobilities, Tourism Geographies, DOI: 10.1080/14616688.2021.1964588
    Abstract
    Mobile camping in a tent or vehicle is an increasingly popular way for tourists to experience place and movement as part of their leisure travel. Allowing tourists to save money, stay close to attractions, and maximise flexibility in their travel, camping provides a convenient accommodation option for domestic and international tourists alike. In the past, camping research has often been conceptualised using theories related to place. Contemporary camping can be interpreted as increasingly mobile in both the movement of people and information, which complements traditional conceptualisations of camping in the literature and in management approaches. Through 17 exploratory qualitative interviews with camping managers in the Mackenzie and Waitaki Districts of New Zealand, this research considered camping manager perspectives on the increasing mobility of camping in New Zealand. Qualitative analysis of these interviews, using Cresswell’s mobilities concepts as a framework, revealed a dynamic camping landscape inextricably enmeshed with complex political meanings about campers and movement. The findings allow the characterisation of campers as Self-Sufficient Spenders, Basic Budgeters, and Kiwi Classics—each representing distinct profiles in relation to mobilities notions of rhythm and speed. Subsequently, we suggest that the increasing mobility of camping needs to be acknowledged both in management approaches and future conceptualisations of camping.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 22 min
    Globalisation and cultural change in Pacific Island countries: the role of tourism

    Globalisation and cultural change in Pacific Island countries: the role of tourism

    Stephen Pratt interviews Denis Tolkach about their paper: Globalisation and cultural change in Pacific Island countries: the role of tourism
    Which can be found here:
    Denis Tolkach & Stephen Pratt (2021) Globalisation and cultural change in Pacific Island countries: the role of tourism, Tourism Geographies, 23:3, 371-396, DOI: 10.1080/14616688.2019.1625071
    Abstract
    Globalisation is often perceived as a threat to the preservation of traditional cultures. There are various approaches to understanding the impact of globalisation on culture. Pieterse’s three paradigms of globalisation and culture, clash of civilisations, McDonaldisation and hybridisation, provide a useful theoretical foundation for understanding how tourism impacts culture. The three paradigms of globalisation assess cultural change holistically. Cultural change in Pacific Island countries (PIC) due to globalisation, especially tourism’s role, in this change, is the focus. Data are sourced via interviews with various tourism stakeholders from Fiji, Tonga and Cook Islands. Tourism is only one driver of cultural change. Other forces include mobilities, migration, diaspora, geopolitical change, technology and popular culture. Examples of the clash of civilisations paradigm include geopolitical changes resulting in different tourism markets and the imitation effect from diaspora and tourists. Commodification of cultural performance for both tourist and local consumption and use of popular culture, for example the animated film Moana, are viewed as McDonaldisation of culture. Participants’ reflections on ongoing evolution of culture including the integration of PIC into the world economy, through increased mobilities and technologies, exemplify hybridisation. In general, the three PIC are found to be culturally resilient. Culture of these PIC is resilient with Pacific Islanders maintaining agency over change, however the impact of various globalisation factors demand effort in preserving culture in the long term.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 13 min
    Uber and employment in the Global South – not-so-decent work

    Uber and employment in the Global South – not-so-decent work

    Jamie Gillen speaks to Julia Giddy about her recent research on uber in South Africa.
    You can read all about it here:
    Julia K. Giddy (2021) Uber and employment in the Global South – not-so-decent work, Tourism Geographies, DOI: 10.1080/14616688.2021.1931955

    Abstract
    Due to its global standards and brand recognition, Uber has become an important form of transportation and is now found throughout the world. It has played a role in transforming local mobilities in many cities, particularly those lacking efficient public transportation options. Uber has played a particularly important role in increasing mobilities in places with security concerns, such as South Africa, due to their competitive rates, the accountability of drivers, and their innovative security features. Uber promotes itself as a peer-to-peer platform that connects drivers to riders, calling drivers ‘partners’, and vehemently dismissing any claims that it is an employer. The company advocates the ability of Uber to increase economic upliftment, particularly in the Global South. South Africa has staggering urban un-and-underemployment rates and, therefore, Uber can be seen as a potential tool for job creation or a means of supplementing low and inconsistent wages. A critical analysis of these claims demonstrates the manner in which Uber has emerged as an employment mechanism in South Africa within a ‘decent work’ framework. The findings are based on an analysis of detailed questionnaires distributed to Uber drivers based in South Africa as well as ethnographic research. It also draws on secondary sources, such as driver forums, newspaper articles and the Uber South Africa website. The findings demonstrate the many challenges faced by Uber drivers such as long working hours, low fares, subcontracting of drivers and concerns over driver safety. The paper introduces primary research in the form of driver surveys and questions the discourse propagated by the company as a mechanism for economic upliftment. In particular, the results show that working for Uber, according to these results, should not be considered decent work.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 21 min

Top Podcasts In Leisure

@mimabycami
Klara
Libération
Fin Du Game
Gautoz
Tycia

You Might Also Like