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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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    • 2.5 • 4 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Past, Present and Future of Amy Coney Barrett

    The Past, Present and Future of Amy Coney Barrett

    Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s pick to fill the empty seat on the Supreme Court, is a product of the conservative legal movement of the 1980s. She clerked for Justice Antonin Scalia, a giant of conservative jurisprudence, and his influence is evident throughout her judicial career.

    Opponents of abortion, in particular, are hoping that her accession to the Supreme Court would be a crucial step forward for their movement.

    Her nomination ceremony in the Rose Garden this weekend appeared unremarkable. But it took place just weeks from a presidential election and barely eight days after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

    Republicans have the votes in the Senate to confirm Judge Barrett and a timetable that suggests that they would be able to do so before Election Day. With her path seemingly clear, we reflect on Judge Barrett’s career and her judicial philosophy.

    Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: In choosing Judge Barrett, President Trump opted for the candidate most likely to thrill his conservative base and outrage his liberal opponents.Judge Barrett’s record suggests that she would push the Supreme Court to the right. Here’s a guide to her stance on abortion, health care, gun rights and the death penalty.

    • 30 min
    The Sunday Read: 'How Climate Migration Will Reshape America'

    The Sunday Read: 'How Climate Migration Will Reshape America'

    In August, Abrahm Lustgarten, who reports on climate, watched fires burn just 12 miles from his home in Marin County, Calif.

    For two years, he had been studying the impact of the changing climate on global migration and recently turned some of his attention to the domestic situation.

    Suddenly, with fires raging so close to home, he had to ask himself the question he had been asking other people: Was it time to move?

    This week on The Sunday Read, Abrahm explores a nation on the cusp of transformation.

    This story was written by Abrahm Lustgarten and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    • 44 min
    The Field: Policing and Power in Minneapolis

    The Field: Policing and Power in Minneapolis

    This episode contains strong language. 

    In June, weeks after George Floyd was killed by the police, a veto-proof majority of the Minneapolis City Council expressed support for dismantling the city’s police department.

    The councilors’ pledges to “abolish,” “dismantle” and “end policing as we know it” changed the local and national conversation about the police.

    President Trump has wielded this decision and law-and-order arguments in his campaigning — Midwestern states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota may be decisive in the general election.

    He has claimed that Joseph R. Biden Jr. wants to defund the police — which he does not — and told voters that they would not be safe in “Biden’s America.”

    On the ground in Minneapolis, Astead Herndon, a national politics reporter, speaks to activists, residents and local politicians about the complexities of trying to overhaul the city’s police.

    Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national politics reporter for The New York Times, speaks to Black Visions Collective co-director, Miski Noor; Jordan Area Community Council executive director, Cathy Spann; and Minneapolis City Council president, Lisa Bender. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Across America there have been calls from some activists and elected officials to defund, downsize or abolish police departments. What would efforts to defund or disband the police really mean?In the wake of George Floyd’s killing, some cities asked if the police are being asked to do jobs they were never intended to do. Budgets are being re-evaluated.

    • 40 min
    On the Ground in Louisville

    On the Ground in Louisville

    This episode contains strong language.

    Breonna Taylor’s mother and her supporters had made their feelings clear: Nothing short of murder charges for all three officers involved in Ms. Taylor’s death would amount to justice.

    On Wednesday, one of the officers was indicted on a charge of “wanton endangerment.” No charges were brought against the two officers whose bullets actually struck Ms. Taylor.

    In response, protesters have again taken to the streets to demand justice for the 26-year-old who was killed in her apartment in March.

    We speak to our correspondent Rukmini Callimachi, who is on the ground in Louisville, Ky., about the reaction to the grand jury’s decision.

    Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: A former Louisville police detective has been charged with “reckless endangerment” for his role in the killing of Breonna Taylor. Protesters poured into the streets, and two officers were shot in Louisville after the announcement. The city’s police chief said that neither of the officers’ injuries were life-threatening.A Times investigation explores the events leading up to the shooting of Ms. Taylor and its consequences.

    • 23 min
    A Historic Opening for Anti-Abortion Activists

    A Historic Opening for Anti-Abortion Activists

    President Trump appears to be on course to give conservatives a sixth vote on the Supreme Court, after several Republican senators who were previously on the fence said they would support quickly installing a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

    In our interview today with Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the anti-abortion Susan B. Anthony List, she says she senses a turning point. “No matter who you are, you feel the ground shaking underneath,” she said. “I’m feeling very optimistic for the mission that our organization launched 25 years ago.”

    In pursuit of that mission, the Susan B. Anthony List struck a partnership with Mr. Trump during the 2016 election. The group supported his campaign and provided organizational backup in battleground states in exchange for commitments that he would work to end abortion rights.

    Ms. Dannenfelser described the partnership as “prudential.”

    “Religious people use that term quite a lot because it acknowledges a hierarchy of goods and evils involved in any decision,” she said. “and your job is to figure out where the highest good is found.”

    Guest: Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: The transformation of groups like the Susan B. Anthony List from opponents of Mr. Trump early in the 2016 campaign into proud and unwavering backers of his presidency illustrates how intertwined the conservative movement has become with the president — and how much they need each other to survive politically.For months, abortion has been relegated to a back burner in the presidential campaign. The death of Justice Ginsburg and the battle to replace her has put the issue firmly back on the agenda.

    • 35 min
    Swing Voters and the Supreme Court Vacancy

    Swing Voters and the Supreme Court Vacancy

    This episode contains strong language and descriptions of sexual violence.

    The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the ensuing battle to fill her seat is set to dominate American politics in the lead up to the election. A poll conducted for The New York Times before Justice Ginsburg’s death found voters in the battleground states of Arizona, Maine and North Carolina placed greater trust in Joseph R. Biden Jr. than in President Trump to fill the next Supreme Court vacancy.

    Now that it’s longer a hypothetical scenario, what impact will the vacant seat have on the thinking of swing voters?

    We take a look at the polling and ask undecided voters whether the death of Justice Ginsburg and the president’s decision to nominate another justice have affected their voting intention.

    Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: In surveys before Justice Ginsburg’s death, Joe Biden led by a slightly wider margin on choosing the next justice than he did over all against President Trump.

    • 31 min

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