69 episódios

The Dean's Seminars, chaired by the Dean, are a series of lunchtime research seminars, which aim to bring together scholars in a new cross-disciplinary enterprise, promoting intellectual debate in a friendly atmosphere.

Dean's Seminars at the School of Advanced Study University of London

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The Dean's Seminars, chaired by the Dean, are a series of lunchtime research seminars, which aim to bring together scholars in a new cross-disciplinary enterprise, promoting intellectual debate in a friendly atmosphere.

    Moral Constitution: Elizabeth Carey's 'Tragedy of Mariam' and the Color of Blood

    Moral Constitution: Elizabeth Carey's 'Tragedy of Mariam' and the Color of Blood

    School of Advanced Study

    Dean's Seminar - Moral Constitution: Elizabeth Carey's 'Tragedy of Mariam' and the Color of Blood

    Professor Kimberly Anne Coles, School of Advanced Study Visiting Fellow, 2012/13

    Chair: Professor Roger Kain, CBE, FBA, Dean of the School of Advanced Study

    If The Tragedy of Mariam is “about” anything, it is about rank—and the privileges of moral courage and superiority that rank inherently bestows. Mariam’s whiteness against the blackness of the characters of Salome and of Herod does constitute the moral encoding of raced subjects—but the “race” in question is a difference in rank. In early modern England, the term “race” commonly referred to family lineage, or bloodline, and relied upon pervasive notions of what were believed to constitute the properties of blood. Carey’s Mariam posits moral differences that are literally a feature of the blood—or humoral disposition—and that are revealed in the external complexion of her characters.

    • 1h 2 min
    • video
    Moral Constitution: Elizabeth Carey's 'Tragedy of Mariam' and the Color of Blood

    Moral Constitution: Elizabeth Carey's 'Tragedy of Mariam' and the Color of Blood

    School of Advanced Study

    Dean's Seminar - Moral Constitution: Elizabeth Carey's 'Tragedy of Mariam' and the Color of Blood

    Professor Kimberly Anne Coles, School of Advanced Study Visiting Fellow, 2012/13

    Chair: Professor Roger Kain, CBE, FBA, Dean of the School of Advanced Study

    If The Tragedy of Mariam is “about” anything, it is about rank—and the privileges of moral courage and superiority that rank inherently bestows. Mariam’s whiteness against the blackness of the characters of Salome and of Herod does constitute the moral encoding of raced subjects—but the “race” in question is a difference in rank. In early modern England, the term “race” commonly referred to family lineage, or bloodline, and relied upon pervasive notions of what were believed to constitute the properties of blood. Carey’s Mariam posits moral differences that are literally a feature of the blood—or humoral disposition—and that are revealed in the external complexion of her characters.

    Looting, stealing and purchasing: the Western acquisition of Arabic manuscripts in the early modern period

    Looting, stealing and purchasing: the Western acquisition of Arabic manuscripts in the early modern period

    School of Advanced Study & The Warburg Institute

    Looting, stealing and purchasing: the Western acquisition of Arabic manuscripts in the early modern period

    Professor Alastair Hamilton, Arcadian Visiting Research Professor, The Warburg Institute
    Chair: Professor Peter Mack, Director, The Warburg Institute

    The lecture surveys the various means by which European collectors acquired Arabic manuscripts in the early modern period and how they established which manuscripts they wanted to acquire. The emphasis will be on the looting carried out during the wars against the Ottomans and the early colonial wars, on the subterfuges necessary for a western collector to buy Islamic manuscripts in the Arab world and to persuade the monastic librarians to part with Christian Arabic manuscripts, and on western efforts to establish a cultural canon in order to identify works of historical and literary importance.

    • 56 min
    • video
    Looting, stealing and purchasing: the Western acquisition of Arabic manuscripts in the early modern period

    Looting, stealing and purchasing: the Western acquisition of Arabic manuscripts in the early modern period

    School of Advanced Study & The Warburg Institute

    Looting, stealing and purchasing: the Western acquisition of Arabic manuscripts in the early modern period

    Professor Alastair Hamilton, Arcadian Visiting Research Professor, The Warburg Institute
    Chair: Professor Peter Mack, Director, The Warburg Institute

    The lecture surveys the various means by which European collectors acquired Arabic manuscripts in the early modern period and how they established which manuscripts they wanted to acquire. The emphasis will be on the looting carried out during the wars against the Ottomans and the early colonial wars, on the subterfuges necessary for a western collector to buy Islamic manuscripts in the Arab world and to persuade the monastic librarians to part with Christian Arabic manuscripts, and on western efforts to establish a cultural canon in order to identify works of historical and literary importance.

    Modern Homes in the Making: Otto Neurath, Josef Frank and Anglo-Austrian Policies of Social Housing

    Modern Homes in the Making: Otto Neurath, Josef Frank and Anglo-Austrian Policies of Social Housing

    Dean's Seminar - Modern Homes in the Making: Otto Neurath, Josef Frank and Anglo-Austrian Policies of Social Housing, 1919-1945

    During the summer of 1932, the International Housing Exposition offered working-class families in Vienna the opportunity to purchase homes designed by a diverse group of leading international architects. For the sociologist Otto Neurath, who collaborated closely with the architect Josef Frank on the planning and promotion of this exhibition, this new approach to housing would result in a maximum of happiness (Glücksmaximum) for the working class. Upon emigrating to Oxford in 1941, Neurath sought to adapt interwar policies of Austrian architecture and sociability to the British context.

    Speaker:Dr Sabrina Rahman, Visiting Fellow, School of Advanced Study and Leverhulme Trust
    Chair: Professor William Marshall, Director, Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies

    • 1h 17 min
    • video
    Modern Homes in the Making: Otto Neurath, Josef Frank and Anglo-Austrian Policies of Social Housing

    Modern Homes in the Making: Otto Neurath, Josef Frank and Anglo-Austrian Policies of Social Housing

    Dean's Seminar - Modern Homes in the Making: Otto Neurath, Josef Frank and Anglo-Austrian Policies of Social Housing, 1919-1945

    During the summer of 1932, the International Housing Exposition offered working-class families in Vienna the opportunity to purchase homes designed by a diverse group of leading international architects. For the sociologist Otto Neurath, who collaborated closely with the architect Josef Frank on the planning and promotion of this exhibition, this new approach to housing would result in a maximum of happiness (Glücksmaximum) for the working class. Upon emigrating to Oxford in 1941, Neurath sought to adapt interwar policies of Austrian architecture and sociability to the British context.

    Speaker:Dr Sabrina Rahman, Visiting Fellow, School of Advanced Study and Leverhulme Trust
    Chair: Professor William Marshall, Director, Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies

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