25 episódios

Future of the Business World is a monthly podcast from the Wharton Global Youth Program at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. Inspired by the Program’s online course of the same name, Future of the Business World features teen entrepreneurs from around the world who are launching startups and products, and learning so much about business along the way. Each month, we will introduce you to a new teen innovator, discussing innovations, inspirations and the themes that define his or her entrepreneurship journey.

Future of the Business World Podcas‪t‬ Wharton Global Youth Program

    • Educação

Future of the Business World is a monthly podcast from the Wharton Global Youth Program at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. Inspired by the Program’s online course of the same name, Future of the Business World features teen entrepreneurs from around the world who are launching startups and products, and learning so much about business along the way. Each month, we will introduce you to a new teen innovator, discussing innovations, inspirations and the themes that define his or her entrepreneurship journey.

    Future of the Business World: A Girl Scout Advocates for Redefining Success

    Future of the Business World: A Girl Scout Advocates for Redefining Success

    Naomi Porter, our March 2021 Future of the Business World podcast guest, embraced entrepreneurship when she was only 11 years old with her first venture, Spice It Up. Now 16 and a high school junior in California, Naomi is using her business experience and Girl Scouts of the USA platform to empower students, research youth challenges, and advocate for change. In this multi-faceted episode, she touches on everything from the travel blogger who helped save her spice business, to her dreams of becoming the U.S. Secretary of Education. Says Naomi: "Instead of asking: What do you want to be when you grow up? Let’s ask kids: How do you want to use your passions and talents to make the world a better place?"

    Wharton Global Youth Program: Hey, everybody! Welcome to Future of the Business World. Each month, we bring you new conversations with Gen Z about innovation, entrepreneurship, leadership, and all kinds of youth-led business trends.

    I’m Diana Drake with the Wharton Global Youth Program at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. At Wharton Global Youth, we design programs, competitions and content introducing high school students to different areas of business education.

    We’ve had some fascinating podcast conversations so far this year, exploring everything from procrastination and 3-D-printed limbs, to civic engagement, coding, and group innovation. I encourage everyone to check out our previous podcast episodes.

    Today’s guest – Naomi Porter -- is a high school junior from Los Angeles, California in the U.S. Naomi has been a proud entrepreneur since the age of 11 and, now 16, is passionate about expanding entrepreneurial education for younger students.

    Naomi, thank you for joining us on Future of the Business World!

    We have so much to talk about, including the Girl Scouts, which holds a special place in my heart as a former Girl Scout Leader.

    First, let’s talk about your first business, Spice It Up, which has been going strong for the past five years. One of the reasons I love this is because you started the company to actually make money! While mission-based entrepreneurship is so incredible, lots of people also start businesses to generate income and profits.

    So, tell us about Spice It Up: what is the business model and how and why did it start?

    Naomi Porter: I started Spice It Up when I was 11 years old after realizing there was really no affordable alternative for students who were looking to go camping, exploring and just in the great outdoors and take spices affordably and compactly. That’s what entrepreneurs do. Whether or not you’re looking to make money or just make change, it’s about looking at your community and figuring out how you can make your world more efficient. How can you make your world more environmentally friendly? And you start asking yourself these questions about how you can create these micro-efficiencies.

    I realized when I was hiking and camping in Girl Scouts that there was no way to carry travel spices. If you’re like me and you’re an avid hiker and backpacker, you know that camp food can sometimes be a little bit bland – and so you need to “spice it up,” which is where I got the name from. And so I decided to create a product that was TSA (Transportation Security Administration)-approved, waterproof, super lightweight and perfect for all sorts of traveling and all kinds of adventuring. As the target consumer myself, I realized that there was a need for this to not only be environmentally friendly, but also affordable for that target consumers. This is a for-profit business. And that’s when I began to develop an entrepreneurial mindset, which is continuing to look in your community and figure out different ways to innovate and different ways to adapt. For me, that was creating Spice It Up when I was 11 years old.

    Wharton Global Youth: Has Spice It Up

    • 28 min
    Future of the Business World: Adventures in Group Innovation and E-Learning

    Future of the Business World: Adventures in Group Innovation and E-Learning

    On this month’s episode of Future of the Business World, Rylan Robb, a high school student from Mozambique, Africa, shares his experience of launching an entrepreneurial idea as part of a team. While attending the Wharton Global Youth Program’s Future of the Business World online course, Rylan and his co-founders launched Zenarc, an online learning platform for their peers. While it’s still a work in progress, Rylan talks about how he hopes that Zenarc will make education more accessible for teens around the world. 

    Wharton Global Youth Program: Hello, everyone! Welcome to Future of the Business World, where we get to spend time with exceptional high school entrepreneurs.

    I’m Diana Drake with the Wharton Global Youth Program at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. At Wharton Global Youth, we design programs, competitions and content that introduce students to all areas of business education while they’re in high school.

    One of the things I love about our programs is how global they are. We meet students from all corners of the world and get to learn from their unique cultures and ideas.

    Today’s guest is a great example of that macro perspective. Rylan Robb is a high school student from Mozambique, Africa, who joined us last summer for our Future of the Business World online course.

    It was there that Rylan’s latest entrepreneurial venture, known as Zenarc, was born. We’re going to catch up today on its progress -- and so much more.

    Rylan, thanks for joining us on Future of the Business World.

    Rylan Robb: Thank you for having me.

    Wharton Global Youth: Entrepreneurship aside, you have had a fascinating journey in the past year. What have you been up to during the pandemic?

    Robb: What a year 2020 was. And when I reflect on the past year, I can’t help but think just how different everyone’s experience was. The world precedent changed, but so did everyone’s life and therefore everyone’s life story.

    My year started out pretty great. I had a school trip to the Netherlands at the end of January [2020]. School was very calm. In Mozambique in particular, things were quite calm with COVID. No one really was freaking out. But toward the end of March our school decided before any cases were in-country to start the transition to online learning, which was inevitable. I remember being in science class when that email got sent out and the atmosphere in that class was very joyful, almost like we were being rewarded. Little did I know that would be the last time for the next nine months that I would see any of my friends in person. And that was tough. About a week after school closed, I left on an embassy repatriation flight in the middle of the night. One suitcase, back to Houston [Texas], where I had previously lived. Over the next months, I spent living out of suitcases, rental homes, it was quite tough. Finally, in the summer something I had looked forward to for a very long time – I attended [Wharton's online summer course] Future of the Business World, Session I. And there I met a lot of great people and started Zenarc, which to this day has given me something grounded, something constant that I’ve been able to work on.

    After the course, we worked on building it up and most of us started our 11th Grade year of high school. Being in the U.S. away from my school, my friends was tough. Due to time zones and other unchangeable forces, I ended up attending school from 2 a.m. to 8 a.m. virtually. Going to bed at 5 p.m., getting up at 1:30 for class at 2 a.m. That was kind of how my life went for a while. Some people may have felt sorry for me or thought my situation was bad, but the change and adaptation is ingrained in me. I’ve lived abroad, moved abroad,

    • 25 min
    Future of the Business World: Building an App for the Scoliosis Community

    Future of the Business World: Building an App for the Scoliosis Community

    In the past year, Christine Sinn, our guest on this month's Future of the Business World podcast, took to heart some recent advice about thinking like an entrepreneur in times of crisis. In an article on that topic, Wharton professor Lori Rosenkopf told us: “Being confined during the pandemic is a great time to practice empathy. How are others feeling? If you can put yourself in their shoes, understand how they are feeling and think about their needs, then it’s only a short step to figuring out how you can help them.” 

    Christine has done just that, using her months at home to learn coding and create a new app for scoliosis patients. In this podcast episode, Christine discusses her deepening connection to technology and to the health care-related community she hopes to empower and serve when her app launches in January 2021.

    Wharton Global Youth Program: Hey, everybody! Welcome to Future of the Business World. Where we get to spend time with exceptional high school entrepreneurs from around the world.

    I’m Diana Drake with the Wharton Global Youth Program at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. At Wharton Global Youth… we design programs, competitions and content that introduce students to all areas of business education while they’re in high school.

    For me, business starts with people. Whether you’re exploring data analytics or investment banking, people are the unifying thread – the personalities and skills of the leaders that drive profits and change.

    Our Wharton Global Youth team has met some interesting and innovative teen entrepreneurs…and we want to introduce them to you.

    Today’s guest, Christine Sinn, is a high school sophomore from Virginia in the U.S. Christine is about to launch her first app, ScolioBend, to help maximize the treatment process of young scoliosis patients.

    Christine, Thanks for joining us on Future of the Business World.

    Christine Sinn: Thanks so much for having me.

    Wharton Global Youth: I’m very interested to learn more about the community you’re building, but first…what is scoliosis and can you talk about your personal connection to this condition?

    Sinn: Scoliosis is an idiopathic curvature of the spine. This means that doctors don’t know why people have scoliosis. The most common types of curvatures are S curves or C curves, where your back is shaped to look like an S or a C. In 6th grade I was going to my pediatrician for my usual annual checkup and my doctor noticed that one side of my back was higher than the other. So, I got an x-ray and was diagnosed with S curve high-to-moderate scoliosis. It was certainly unexpected and it resulted in a lot of large changes in my life. I was playing tennis pre-professionally and I wanted to be a professional tennis player. With scoliosis, I wasn’t able to play tennis anymore. Little did I know that having scoliosis actually set me on a very different path for my future. It set me on a path to entrepreneurship and to where I am today.

    Wharton Global Youth: Wow, you were actually going to be a professional tennis player?

    Sinn: Yes, I was training a lot; two or three times a week with a retired tennis coach. I had big plans, but now I have even bigger plans.

    Wharton Global Youth: Was it disappointing to have to change course?

    Sinn: It was very disappointing at first because I invested a lot of my time and energy into tennis. But also I think having scoliosis opened my perspective to everything beyond tennis. I was really focused on tennis only, but now I’m able to explore all my interests beyond tennis, so I think that having scoliosis is a blessing.

    Wharton Global Youth: You began to think about starting a business this past summer when you enrolled in our Future of the Business World online course.

    • 18 min
    Future of the Business World: A Lemonade Stand Inspires a Finance Project in Colombia

    Future of the Business World: A Lemonade Stand Inspires a Finance Project in Colombia

    In our fourth Future of the Business World podcast episode, we travel to Bogota, Colombia by way of Florida. High school student Camilo Saiz, who has a passion for finance, moved to the U.S. from Colombia when he was 12, and yet he never lost his connection to and compassion for the country that shaped him. At a time of year when many consider ways to make a lasting social impact, Camilo shares his experiences of entrepreneurship and giving through education, and why he believes that “helping others is contagious.” 



     

    Wharton Global Youth: Hey, Everybody. Welcome to the Future of the Business World podcast. I’m Diana Drake, managing editor of Knowledge@Wharton High School, the only online business journal for high school students. We’re part of the Wharton Global Youth Program at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. The mission of this podcast is to explore the future of the business world through the eyes of teen entrepreneurs and innovators. As the world constantly changes and evolves, young trailblazers are embracing the entrepreneurial mindset and finding ways to solve problems and understand emerging trends. They are identifying market needs, creating products, providing critical services and designing innovative projects. We have met some amazing future business leaders and we want to introduce them and their ideas to you.

    Camilo Saiz is 17 and a junior at The Benjamin School in Palm Beach, Florida. Hi Camilo, welcome to Future of the Business World.

    Camilo Saiz:  Hi Mrs. Drake. Thank you for having me here. It’s a pleasure.

    Camilo has crossed paths with us before. He came to Wharton in Philadelphia for our summer program in finance and more recently took part in our two-week online course known as none other than ‘Future of the Business World.’

    Wharton Global Youth: Are you ready to tackle the world of business and finance after spending time at Wharton?

    Camilo: Yes, I’ve had some awesome opportunities and adventures at Wharton. Last summer I did the finance program and I learned a lot about financial literacy and it really motivated me to further pursue my educational goals.

    Wharton Global Youth: Camilo’s story is less about the education he’s getting and more about his goals as an educator, which reach into his home of Bogota, Colombia. The beginning is always a great place to start, so can you tell us about growing up in Colombia, Camilo. What was it like and do you feel it exposed you to a unique perspective on the world?

    Camilo: First of all, I’d like to say that I believe that Bogota, Colombia is one of the most beautiful places in the world and that it a country that is very often misunderstood. It’s filled with beautiful culture and the people of Colombia are absolutely beautiful in every way -- their hearts, they’re just amazing people.

    Diving into what it’s like to grow up there, it’s definitely very different than growing up in America. I definitely had a very different childhood than a lot of my friends and peers in a sense that I was exposed to different aspects of the world. Growing up in Colombia, I remember taking the bus to school every morning and we would drive through some impoverished parts of the city in which we would just see people in the streets begging for money and people struggling to get to school. We were so lucky to have a bus; so blessed. The greatest difference was seeing these people every single morning and feeling so blessed for everything we had. When it comes to the social aspect of growing up in Colombia, there is certainly a wall that divides the different classes. With that being said, there is a great emphasis on many different levels of giving back to the community. I believe that it’s through projects I was involved in with my family, with friends,

    • 19 min
    Future of the Business World: Sanjana Yeddula on Raising Gen Z’s Political Awareness

    Future of the Business World: Sanjana Yeddula on Raising Gen Z’s Political Awareness

    In September 2020, the Wharton Global Youth Program launched its first podcast series, Future of the Business World, which explores the motivations and creations of young entrepreneurs from around the world. The project was inspired by the program's Future of the Business World online course, launched in the summer of 2020. Be sure to listen to our debut podcast episodes with Rucha Mehendale and Jakarta’s Jiro Noor. They’re both fascinating innovators. 

    This month, our conversation fittingly focuses on Gen Z’s civic engagement, particularly as it applies to the U.S. presidential election on November 3, 2020. In the past year Sanjana Yeddula, a high school senior from New Jersey, U.S., has created a product to help youth navigate the online news about political figures. Her team won recognition at this year’s Diamond Challenge global high school entrepreneurship competition. Through the development of her digital product, Sanjana has collected insights about teenagers’ political activities and what it might take to bring the next generation of voters more deeply into the political process.

    Listen to the podcast at the top of this page or on iTunes! An edited transcript of our conversation appears below. 



    Wharton Global Youth Program: Hello! And welcome to Future of the Business World, a podcast that features young entrepreneurs sharing their successes, challenges, and unique perspectives. I’m Diana Drake with the Wharton Global Youth Program at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. At Wharton Global Youth, we work with lots of high school students through our summer programs, competitions, and online business journal. Honestly, they inspire us. Time and again, they tell us their stories of innovation and entrepreneurship. And they pitch their ideas with endless passion and creativity. So, we decided to bring some of those stories to you.

    Today, I’d like to welcome Sanjana Yeddula to Future of the Business World. It’s great to meet you. Sanjana is a high school senior from New Jersey in the U.S. About a year ago, she launched a product called PoliPro, a Google Chrome extension that helps people explore politics and better understand current events. As we navigate an energized election season in the U.S., I think it’s a great time to discuss this topic. Sanjana, can you tell us more about PoliPro? How does it work?

    Sanjana Yeddula: Like you said, PoliPro is a Google Chrome extension that I developed with some friends. We noted that a lot of teenagers our age aren’t aware of what’s happening in our country and not very engaged with our political discourse. When we began to ask around we noticed that it came down to two main factors: people weren’t willing to put in as much time to read news articles and when they began to do so oftentimes it got really confusing. The goal of PoliPro is to ease these two obstacles without having people stray from their typical news sources. All you have to do is go to the Google Chrome store, download the PoliPro extension and after that you’re good to go.

    If you’re on any article on the web, you can highlight an unknown figure or political figure and click the PoliPro icon in the corner of your browser. After that, a pop-up will come up right next to your article that provides further background on whatever you’re reading. For instance, if you’re reading about our current election and want to know more about Kamala Harris, you highlight her name and a picture of her with different icons that indicate her policies will pop up. You can hover over her picture to learn more about her...

    • 14 min
    Future of the Business World: Cool Sneakers and ‘Creative Destruction’ with Jiro Noor

    Future of the Business World: Cool Sneakers and ‘Creative Destruction’ with Jiro Noor

    In September 2020, the Wharton Global Youth Program launched its first podcast, Future of the Business World, which explores the motivations and creations of young entrepreneurs from around the world. In case you missed it, be sure to listen to our debut episode with Rucha Mehendale.

    This month, we travel to Jakarta, Indonesia, to explore the intersection of technology and entrepreneurship with high school student Jiro Noor. Jiro, 16, is endlessly curious and innovative, reflected in his diverse pursuits, from sneaker apps to 3-D-printed limbs for children. He spent part of this summer studying online with Wharton in our Future of the Business World course. Jiro is already well on his way to having a profound economic and social impact on the business world, all while wearing his favorite Nike HyperAdapts.  

    An edited version of our conversation appears below.

    Wharton Global Youth: Hey, everybody! Welcome to the Future of the Business World podcast. I’m Diana Drake with the Wharton Global Youth Program at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

    We’re exploring the Future of the Business World through the eyes of teen entrepreneurs and innovators. As the world constantly changes and evolves, young trailblazers are embracing the entrepreneurial mindset and finding ways to solve problems and understand emerging trends. We’ve met some amazing future business leaders – and we want to introduce them to you.

    Jiro Noor is 16 and a high school student living in Jakarta, Indonesia. Jiro, Welcome to Future of the Business World.

    Jiro Noor: Thanks for having me.

    Wharton Global Youth: Jiro is living at the intersection of technology and business. Jiro’s various entrepreneurial endeavors have leveraged the power of technology to quite literally help the world.

    Before we discuss that bigger impact, though, we need to start by looking down. Jiro, your coding life began with a shoe collection. Tell us about your alias as a sneakerhead and how you used technology to build a sneaker community in Jakarta.

    Jiro: Thank you, Diana. Initially, since I was a kid I really loved collecting sneakers. But to be a sneakerhead in Indonesia is difficult. The problem is that in Indonesia, lots of sneaker retailers like Nike and Adidas are hesitant to sell the trendy sneakers desired because they don’t believe there’s a market here. But they’re wrong. If I wanted to buy rare sneakers like Air Jordans, I’d have to wait for the school holidays like spring break or summer break. Whenever I had the opportunity to travel to Japan or New York, I would get the sneakers and bring them back. When I needed money for savings, I would start selling these sneakers. Initially, I sold some of these sneakers overseas on Instagram. But then I realized that the sneakerheads in Indonesia like me are also doing the same thing. So I decided why don’t I use my love for coding to connect them all in one platform to one app. And this app is known as BE-EM.ID.

    Wharton Global Youth:  How many sneakers have you sold through this app?

    Jiro: I’ve sold 200 sneakers through the app, 250 if you count the previous ones I sold through Instagram. That’s a lot.

    Wharton Global Youth: How many do you have in your collection and what’s your favorite pair?

    Jiro: I have close to 100, not quite, but I’m getting there. My favorite pair is the Nike HyperAdapts because it’s one of the only self-lacing sneakers. It really captures the beauty of form and function. Nike believes it’s going to be the future of self-lacing technology and I feel [this sneaker] really captures the beauty of it.

    Wharton Global Youth: You’ve gone on to build other apps,

    • 19 min

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