100 episodes

Housecall for Health covers all the topics that affect your health.

Housecall for Health FOX News Channel

    • Health & Fitness

Housecall for Health covers all the topics that affect your health.

    If You Have a Peanut Allergy… Those Days May Soon Be Over

    If You Have a Peanut Allergy… Those Days May Soon Be Over

    There could soon be a cure for one of the most common allergies. FOX's Alex Hein with more in this "Housecall for Health": This is Housecall for Health. Peanut allergy sufferers may soon know the joy of peanut-butter flavored goodness after a study found effectiveness in an oral treatment. Researches gave children with the allergy a probiotic with a peanut protein daily for 18 months. A month later, 80 percent were able to tolerate peanuts without any symptoms. Four years later, 70 percent were still able to eat peanuts without any adverse reactions. About half of the children involved in the study were consuming peanuts regularly while others were eating them infrequently. A lead researcher told BBC News that it's the first time a treatment for the allergy was shown to be effective for such a long period of time. She said the main takeaway is that children who had an allergy were able to eat them the same as children who do not have an allergy, and that over time they remained tolerant of the previous allergen. For more on this story, check FOXNewsHealth.com. Housecall for Health, I'm Alex Hein, FOX News. Follow Alex Hein on Twitter: @Ahlex3889

    Less ZzZz’s at Night Equal More Weight on Your Waist, Study Finds

    Less ZzZz’s at Night Equal More Weight on Your Waist, Study Finds

    Could the amount of sleep you are getting have an impact on your weight? FOX's Alex Hein explains a new study in this "Housecall for Health": This is Housecall for Health. So, not only could skimping on your sleep hurt your mental health or give you bags under your eyes, but it could also add some pounds to your waistline. This new study, which followed 1600 adults who self reported sleeping habits, found that those who got an average of six hours of shuteye had a waist circumference three centimeters larger than those who slept for nine hours a night. Those who were skimping on sleep also had higher BMI and lower good-cholesterol levels. There was a group who fell in between six and nine hours, with participants getting an average of 7.5 hours of shuteye. Those adults still fared better than those who were only getting six hours. Researchers emphasized that they didn't find a link between less sleep and poorer diets, nor did they prove a direct explanation as to whether less sleep caused you to gain weight or was the result of weight gain. For more on this story, check FOXNewsHealth.com. Housecall for Health, I'm Alex Hein, FOX News. Follow Alex Hein on Twitter: @Ahlex3889

    Scientists One Step Closer to Curing AIDS?

    Scientists One Step Closer to Curing AIDS?

    Scientists may be one giant step closer to a cure in the fight to end AIDS. FOX's Alex Hein explains in this "Housecall for Health": This is Housecall for Health. In a major reveal at an AIDS conference in Paris, researchers said a South African girl who was born with the AIDS virus has kept her infection suppressed for more than eight years after stopping anti-HIV medicines. They say the results are evidence that early treatment is capable of causing long-term remission. Currently, HIV treatments that aim to keep the virus under control must be taken over of a lifetime, and only one person has ever been thought to be cured. But his treatment involved a bone marrow transplant from a donor with a natural resistance to HIV, which is risky and impractical due to the large number of patients already infected. What's hopeful about the girl's case, is that she is the third child to enter long remission after beginning aggressive treatment soon after infection. She started when she was two and stopped 40 weeks later. Tests found the virus was not capable of reproducing in her immune system cells. For more on this story, check FOXNewsHealth.com. Housecall for Health, I'm Alex Hein, FOX News. Follow Alex Hein on Twitter: @Ahlex3889

    Researchers Develop a 3D Artificial Heart

    Researchers Develop a 3D Artificial Heart

    Three dimensional printing technology may soon help people on long transplant wait-lists. FOX's Steve Rappoport with the details in this "Housecall for Health": This is Housecall for Health. The power of 3D printing continues to amaze us all, and now scientists have upped the ante yet again, creating a silicone heart that beats just like a human one. The group, based in Zurich, posted a video of their model which even has a fluid pumping through the heart just like a real organ. The only caveat with this amazing feat, is that it only lasts for 3,000 beats, and then the material gives out. To you and I this may seem like a failure, but researchers say it's a major advance toward potential options when considering how to build artificial hearts, which now rely on mechanical parts that are prone to complications. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, with people of all ages and backgrounds suffering from the illness. An advancement in this field could provide relief to those patients, and millions more worldwide. For more on this story, check FOXNewsHealth.com. Housecall for Health, I'm Steve Rappoport, FOX News. Follow Steve Rappoport on Twitter: @SteveRappoport

    Spots on the Face People Miss When Applying Suntan Lotion

    Spots on the Face People Miss When Applying Suntan Lotion

    This is Housecall for Health. Though the face is the most common place for skin cancer to appear, on average we miss about 10 percent of it when applying sunscreen. University of Liverpool researchers asked 57 participants to apply sunscreen to their face with no further instructions or details on how to do it. Photos were taken of each person's face with a UV-sensitive camera before and after the application. The areas covered with sunscreen appeared black due to the camera. On average, people missed about 9.5 percent of their whole face, most commonly skipping the eye lids and areas between the inner corner of the eye and bridge of the nose. On a second go round, researchers asked them to do it again after telling them specifically about skin cancers of the eyelid region. This time, there was a slight improvement, with users missing just about 7.7 percent of their face. Researchers said sunglasses will help protect these crucial areas if you can't remember to. For more on this story check FOXNewsHealth.com. Housecall for Health, I'm Alex Hein, FOX News. Follow Alex Hein on Twitter: @Ahlex3889

    U.S. Reaches Historic Low for Births – CDC

    U.S. Reaches Historic Low for Births – CDC

    This is Housecall for Health. The number of women giving birth in the U.S. has hit a historic low, causing some experts to warn about a potential national emergency. There is good news from this stat as the number of teen births in the country continued to fall. However, the number also decreased for women in their twenties, and while the number increased for women in their thirties and forties, it was not enough to prevent an overall decline. The low, which was tacked at one percent lower to the number of births recorded last year, may not seem significant now, but experts cautioned that if the rate continues to drop we could see economic and even cultural turmoil. The data, which was released by the CDC, also showed that the U.S. had higher fertility rates compared to other developed countries, and still more birth compared to deaths. While some sounded alarm, others said to watch for new trends as the economy shifts upward again. For more on this story, check FOXNewsHealth.com. Housecall for Health, I'm Alex Hein, FOX News. Follow Alex Hein on Twitter: @Ahlex3889

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