62 episódios

Podcast weblog for seminars presented at Manatū Taonga - the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

New Zealand History Manatū Taonga - Ministry for Culture and Heritage (NZ)

    • História

Podcast weblog for seminars presented at Manatū Taonga - the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

    Kei roto i te miru: inside the bubble

    Kei roto i te miru: inside the bubble

    What happens when a pandemic hits and the country is locked down? How can we help keep New Zealanders connected?In collaboration with Sue Berman, Principal Oral History Advisor Auckland Libraries, staff at Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage got on Zoom and hatched a plan to use free online software to encourage nine oral historians from various communities around the country to collect short oral histories with our support. Thirty-five stories with Ngāti Porou, LGBTQI community members, rural Pākehā, health workers, musicians, young Mums, Pacific Island New Zealanders, Northland community workers and Chinese New Zealanders were the result.In this talk Tuaratini will discuss her involvement in the project as a community interviewer, while radio producer and journalist Teresa Cowie will describe her experience working on the creative output of the oral histories. The resulting weekly podcast series, ‘Kei roto i te miru: inside the bubble’, launched on 25 March this year based on the interviews undertaken during the 2020 Covid-19 lockdown.
     
    These monthly Public History Talks are a collaboration between the National Library of New Zealand and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.

    • 45 min
    ‘Palmy Proud’? Audience and Approach in Writing the History of a Provincial City

    ‘Palmy Proud’? Audience and Approach in Writing the History of a Provincial City

    In this Public History Talk,  co-editor and a writer for City at the Centre: A History of Palmerston North Margaret Tennant will discuss the dilemmas faced by its editors and the question of audience for such a volume: whether to take a thematic, ‘slice’ or chronological approach, how much to assume in terms of local knowledge, and whether to link with a commemorative event. City at the Centre evolved with the knowledge of other, complementary forms of story-telling about place, but also against perceptions of Palmerston North as ‘boring’ and less significant than the four main centres. How much history is obliged to become promotion becomes an issue. And, as with any publication, there are always the things which would have been done differently with hindsight.
    Pulled together during the 2020 Covid lockdown, City at the Centre was published in October 2020.In a previous life Margaret Tennant lectured in history at Massey University, her special interests the history of women, of health and of social policy.  She has more recently focused on local history, and is on the PHANZA national committee.
    These monthly Public History Talks are a collaboration between the National Library of New Zealand and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.
     
    Recorded live at the National Library of New Zealand, 3 March 2020.

    • 41 min
    Tamihana Te Rauparaha's life of Te Rauparaha

    Tamihana Te Rauparaha's life of Te Rauparaha

    ‘He Pukapuka Tātaku i ngā Mahi a Te Rauparaha Nui’ is a 50,000-word account of Te Rauparaha’s life written by his son Tamihana Te Rauparaha in the late 1860s. A rich source of Ngāti Toa history, language and culture, it offers fascinating insights into traditional Māori society and the tumultuous history of the 1820s and 1830s. This was an era characterised by intertribal conflict and the redrawing of the tribal map of Aotearoa, as well as by early encounters between Māori and Europeans that were largely conducted on Māori terms. Tamihana’s account of his father’s life has now been published in full for the first time in a parallel Māori/English edition.
    In this talk, the book’s translator and editor Ross Calman will discuss the historical context that led to the creation of Tamihana’s manuscript, give an overview of how the manuscript has been represented by various writers and translators over the past 150 years and describe some of the challenges he faced in interpreting the manuscript for a modern audience.
    These monthly Public History Talks are a collaboration between the National Library of New Zealand and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.
    Recorded live at the National Library of New Zealand, 2 December 2020.
     
     
     

    • 49 min
    Te Mana O Te Reo Māori

    Te Mana O Te Reo Māori

    Today, te reo Māori is recognised as an important part of New Zealand culture and identity. But things were not always so hopeful for the language. By the 1970s, te reo Māori was on the verge of extinction. The long journey of revitalisation has been marked with many challenges and many victories.
    Part of the journey was taking Wai 11, the te reo Māori claim, to the Waitangi Tribunal. The resulting report confirmed te reo Māori was a taonga the Crown had to actively protect and contributed to te reo Māori being made an official language in 1987.
    Te reo Māori champions Piripi Walker and Justice Joe Williams speak about their own journeys in language revitalisation and the wider movement across the country. A facilitated discussion with Dr Vincent Olsen-Reeder follows.
    This talk is in support of the new Te Mana O Te Reo Māori online story, part of Te Tai Treaty Settlement Stories, a programme initiated by Manatū Taonga which aims to enhance understanding of the past by exploring Treaty settlements and their enduring impact.
    These monthly Public History Talks are a collaboration between the National Library of New Zealand and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.
    Recorded live at the National Library of New Zealand, 4 November 2020.
     

    • 1h 18 min
    Unpacking the Suitcase

    Unpacking the Suitcase

    When German-Jewish refugees arrived in New Zealand in the 1930s fleeing Hitler’s Europe, they brought everything they could from their former homes: furniture, luggage, personal documents, musical instruments, artwork, books, silverware, linen, a typewriter. Some of these humble and remarkable domestic objects survive today, a few in public heritage collections; most in the private family homes of descendants.
    But while the Jewish refugee migration story is well known, less so is the story of those objects. In this talk, Louisa Hormann shares findings from a research project exploring the relationships between Holocaust survivor refugee families, their descendants, and the material objects they have inherited.
    These monthly Public History Talks are a collaboration between the National Library of New Zealand and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.
    Recorded live at the National Library of New Zealand, 7 October 2020.
     

    • 48 min
    Māori women and the armed forces in WWII

    Māori women and the armed forces in WWII

    Angela Wanhalla (Kāi Tahu), is an associate professor in the History Programme, University of Otago. She teaches and writes about New Zealand history and is currently involved in a collaborative research project on the histories and legacies of the Māori home front during the Second World War.
    In this Public History Talk Angela Wanhalla looks at the recruitment of Māori women into the auxiliary services, why they joined, and how their wartime service impacted on their post-war lives.
    These monthly Public History Talks are a collaboration between the National Library of New Zealand and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.
    Recorded live at the National Library of New Zealand, 2 September 2020.
     

    • 55 min

Top podcasts em História

Ouvintes também assinaram