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This is Ali's Blog. It's about turkish music, joomla CMS and podcasting

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This is Ali's Blog. It's about turkish music, joomla CMS and podcasting

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    Installing Joomla! 1.5 In MAMP Environment On Your Mac

    Installing Joomla! 1.5 In MAMP Environment On Your Mac

    Watch Video GNU General Public License. You can download MAMP from Living-e AG. The download page can be found HERE. Current MAMP versions require Mac OS X 10.4.x. If you're running Mac OS X 10.3.x you can download an earlier version of MAMP 1.4.1 (universal binary), for Intel and PowerPC. Previously this site covered installing Joomla! 1.0x in the MAMP environment on your computer. Now that Joomla! 1.5 is available as a stable release you may want to install version 1.5 site on your Macintosh computer using MAMP. The two versions of Joomla! install methods are very similar but there are changes to Joomla! 1.5 that you can get familiar with here. As of this writing MAMP is a Universal Binary version 1.7.1. The download is a 127 MB disk image. There is also a MAMP Pro version that you can read about HERE. This article will deal with the regular and free version of MAMP. MAMP is installed on your computer in your 'Applications' Folder. In order to work properly the MAMP folder must be located in the Applications folder. You should also have at least 250 MB of free space on your hard drive. Once MAMP is installed on your Mac you are now ready to install Joomla! 1.5. Get the latest full install of Joomla! from joomla.org. On the home page of joomla.org There is usually a banner with a button to download Joomla! When you click that download button you may be taken to a page which offers a couple of compressed install package options. The install packages come compressed as a .zip, .tar.gz, and .tar.bz2 compression. Your Macintosh OSX computer can deal with any of these compressions. Pick the one of your choosing and download that to your computer. Let's say that you chose the .tar.gz package. Your download will likely be called 'Joomla_1.5.8-Stable-Full_Package.tar.gz'. Note that '1.5.8' will change as newer releases of Joomla! are made available. Uncompress this package on your hard drive by double clicking it. Your Mac OS X computer will expand the package into a folder with all the folders and files inside that you require for your install. You can change that expanded folder name into something simpler like Joomla153 for instance. That's what we'll use for this article. Move this entire Joomla153 folder and its contents to the MAMP application and put it inside the folder called 'htdocs'. The path to the 'htdocs' folder will be /Applications/MAMP/htdocs. Now you are ready to install Joomla! 1.5. You can start MAMP, the application is inside the MAMP folder. It's simply called 'MAMP'. When MAMP starts up it should launch your web browser, if it isn't already running, and take you to a start up page with a URL of http://localhost:8888/MAMP/?language=English. Before you navigate to the Joomla! web installation page you are going to need an MySQL database for Joomla!. This can be created using phpMyAdmin which is included with your MAMP install. You can get to phpMyAdmin from the startup page in MAMP. Get to the startup page either by clicking the button 'Open start page' on the MAMP startup interface screen or open by typing the following URL in your web browser: http://localhost:8888/MAMP The page that appears has a navigation toolbar near the top of the page. You will find a button for phpMyAdmin on it. When the page refreshes you will be on the phpMyAdmin screen. About half way down the page on you will see in bold text 'Create new database' and a field for you to type in the name you want to use for your database. For this article we are going to call the database 'joomla153' (without the quotes). The default settings of this page should be fine to use. Once you type in the name of your database click the 'Create' button. When the screen refreshes you will see the results 'Database joomla153 has been created.' There will be no tables for this database and you do not need to create any because your Joomla! install will create

    The music of Turkey

    The music of Turkey

    The music of Turkey includes diverse elements ranging from Central Asian folk music and music from Ottoman Empire dominions such as Persian music, Balkan music and Byzantine music, as well as more modern European and American popular music influences. In turn, it has influenced these cultures through the Ottoman Empire.[1] Turkey is a country on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea, and is a crossroad of cultures from across Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, the Caucasus and South and Central Asia. The roots of traditional music in Turkey spans across centuries to a time when the Seljuk Turks colonized Anatolia and Persia in the 11th century and contains elements of both Turkic and pre-Turkic influences. Much of its modern popular music can trace its roots to the emergence in the early 1930s drive for Westernization.[2] With the absorbance of immigrants from various regions the diversity of musical genres and musical instrumentation also expanded. Turkey has also seen documented folk music and recorded popular music produced in the ethnic styles of Armenian, Greek, Polish, Azeri and Jewish communities, among others.[1] Many Turkish cities and towns have vibrant local music scenes which, in turn, support a number of regional musical styles. Historical background Traditional music in Turkey falls into two main genres; classical art music and folk music. Turkish classical music is characterized by an Ottoman elite culture and influenced lyrically by neighbouring regions and Ottoman provinces, such as Persian and Byzantine vocal traditions and South European cultures.[3] Earlier forms are sometimes termed as saray music in Turkish, meaning royal court music, indicating the source of the genre comes from Ottoman royalty as patronage and composer.[4] Neo-classical or postmodern versions of this traditional genre are termed as art music or sanat musikisi, though often it is unofficially termed as alla turca. In addition, from the saray or royal courts came the Ottoman military band, Mehter takımı in Turkish, considered to be the oldest type of military marching band in the world. It was also the forefather of modern Western percussion bands and has been described as the father of Western military music.[5] Turkish folk music is the music of Turkish-speaking rural communities of Anatolia, the Balkans, and Middle East. While Turkish folk music contains definitive traces of the Central Asian Turkic cultures, it has also strongly influenced and been influenced by many other indigenous cultures. Religious music in Turkey is sometimes grouped with folk music due to the tradition of the wandering minstrel or aşık (pronounced ashuk), but its influences on Sufism due to the spritiual Mevlevi sect arguably grants it special status.[6] It has been suggested the distinction between the two major genres comes during the Tanzîmat period of Ottoman era, when Turkish classical music was the music played in the Ottoman palaces and folk music was played in the villages.[7][3] However, with the type of cultural cross-breeding the empire allowed, both genres relate to the multitudes of ethnic groups to be found in the make-up of the Ottoman Empire. In that sense they are the first examples of their kind in world music.[7][3] Although Turkish classical and folk music have generally enjoyed a broad popularity regardless of subcultures, regional classical music has had lapses in prominence. When the modern Turkish state was proclaimed in 1923, the new republic aimed at creating a nation with a distinct and unified culture. This included replacing the culture of Istanbul, which was perceived as the Ottoman elite, by the culture of rural Anatolia, which was considered Turkish. Hence, folk music was promoted, while classical music became less popular.[2] Moreover, western classical music was introduced and encouraged in accordance with one of

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