76 episódios

A raunchy jaunt through the historical--and hysterical--elements of English culture. Get a rude take on all your favorite bits of the Renaissance: Shakespeare, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, sex, theater, poetry, courtly behavior, war, manners, and more! Perfect for the Ren faire enthusiast or adventurous educator looking to make history come alive.

Rude Tudors Liz Rodriguez

    • Sociedade e cultura

A raunchy jaunt through the historical--and hysterical--elements of English culture. Get a rude take on all your favorite bits of the Renaissance: Shakespeare, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, sex, theater, poetry, courtly behavior, war, manners, and more! Perfect for the Ren faire enthusiast or adventurous educator looking to make history come alive.

    80-Fake Dragon News

    80-Fake Dragon News

    What do dragons and fake news have in common? The newest episode of Rude Tudors, hosted by literary historian Liz Rodriguez and nerdy laywoman Nicole Keating. Laugh and learn the answers to the following questions:
    What did Renaissance people believe about dragons and their presence in history? Why would people circulate a story they know to be untrue (other than sabotaging the election of a sovereign state)? How does ideology play a role in how we interpret reality? Are you DTL--down to learn? Then take a raunchy jaunt through the times of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and Shakespeare.
    Connect and ask your own burning historical questions at 872-302-RUDE, RudeTudors@gmail.com, Facebook, Twitter

    • 52 min
    79-Hating on the Dutch

    79-Hating on the Dutch

    In this episode, literary historian Liz Rodriguez and nerdy laywoman Nicole Keating unpack the bizarre origin story of the land of Belgium and its noble people as told through a racist English broadsheet from 1653. The birth of the Dutch involves a monstrous horse-man-fish, poop, butter, wizards, and demons. What’s not to love? Find out the answers to:
    What did early modern nationalistic propaganda look like? What did the English have against the Dutch? How did poop humor get used politically in 17th century England? At a time when the English were anxious about jobs, trades, and the integrity of their language, even the Dutch could be threatening. Learn about the rich history of early modern England and their relationship with their neighbors during the era of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and Shakespeare.

    • 33 min
    78-Going Ape

    78-Going Ape

    You know monkeys are hot. Renaissance folks might have thought so, judging from the sexualized and exotic ways in which they depicted and discussed apes and their ilk. In this episode of English history podcast Rude Tudors, literary historian Liz Rodriguez and nerdy laywoman Nicole Keating dig into popular descriptions of monkeys and apes, an animal that many people would never have seen in the flesh. Where did they get their information? From bestiaries, or wacky encyclopedias that were part myth, part legend, part history, and part observation. But they were totally nuts. Find out the answers to the following questions: 
    What are the tropes commonly used to describe and position apes and monkeys?  What is the role of the exotic in perceptions of apes and monkeys?  What do apes and monkeys have in common with humans, and what does that say about Renaissance conceptions of humanity? Check out RudeTudors.com to play along with Hot or Not: Monkey Edition. 
    Are you DTL--down to learn? Then take a raunchy jaunt through the times of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and Shakespeare.
    Connect and ask your own burning historical questions at 872-302-RUDE, RudeTudors@gmail.com, Facebook, Twitter

    • 50 min
    77-Persistent Working Women

    77-Persistent Working Women

    In the words of that immortal poet Rihanna "Work, work, work, work, work" is the subject of this episode of history podcast Rude Tudors. More specifically, literary historian Liz Rodriguez and nerdy laywoman Nicole Keating dig deep into the lives of three badass working women. From crossdressing pirate to propagandist spy to philanthropic banker, these Renaissance ladies worked their way through the world. Find out the answers to...
    How were women's roles in the economy limited in Renaissance England? What were some ways around those rules? Highlights include Ben Jonson cosplay, the horrors of early modern ultrasounds, callbacks to burn books, old-timey wage gaps, and more!
    Are you DTL--down to learn? Then take a raunchy jaunt through the times of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and Shakespeare.
    Connect at 872-302-RUDE, RudeTudors,com, RudeTudors@gmail.com, Facebook, Twitter

    • 50 min
    76-Islam in England

    76-Islam in England

    Shakespeare’s phrase “turning Turk” was a loaded accusation in Renaissance England. In this episode of history podcast Rude Tudors, literary historian Liz Rodriguez and nerdy laywoman Nicole Keating delve into stereotypes and misconceptions about adherents of Islam in Europe in the 1500s and 1600s. Characterizations of Muslims ran the gamut, from violent infidels to sexual deviants to economic rivals. Questions abounded: where were they from? Were they black? Would they force Christians to convert? Get to the bottom of the following questions:
    What sorts of stereotypes re: Muslims existed? What kinds of beliefs & anxieties are registered in English perception of Middle Eastern & African peoples? Plus: a plagiarized, presidential essay; Obama impersonators at birthday parties; cucumbers as nature’s dildos; and much more!
    Are you DTL—down to learn? Take a raunchy jaunt through the historical and hysterical dimensions of the era of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and the Young Pope (maybe).
    Connect at 872-302-RUDE, RudeTudors,com, RudeTudors@gmail.com, Facebook, Twitter

    • 45 min
    75-Syphilis Smells

    75-Syphilis Smells

    In this episode of English Renaissance podcast Rude Tudors, literary historian Liz Rodriguez and nerdy laywoman Nicole Keating discuss a listener question! They dig into the history of syphilis: its supposed origins, symptoms, and treatments. Things get graphic with descriptions of chestnut-sized pustules and penile growths the size of plums, so gird your loins. Questions answered in this episode include:
    Why was this disease such a common, cheap joke in Shakespearean drama? Who was blamed for its spread? How do outdated discourses of sexually transmitted disease still resonate today? Join this raunchy jaunt through the time of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and Christopher Marlowe.
    Connect at 872-302-RUDE, RudeTudors,com, RudeTudors@gmail.com, Facebook, Twitter

    • 37 min

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