33 episódios

Archivists and researchers at the Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor and Urban Affairs share stories from its collections about the American labor movement, metropolitan Detroit, and Wayne State University.

Tales from the Reuther Library Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University

    • História

Archivists and researchers at the Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor and Urban Affairs share stories from its collections about the American labor movement, metropolitan Detroit, and Wayne State University.

    Uncovering Detroit Sound: Sippie Wallace and Son House in the Folklore Archives

    Uncovering Detroit Sound: Sippie Wallace and Son House in the Folklore Archives

    Archivist Bart Bealmear explains how he rediscovered recordings of famed African American blues musicians Sippie Wallace and Son House buried in the Reuther Library’s Folklore Archives. One of the most famous female blues vocalists in the 1920s, Sippie Wallace left the blues stage for four decades, choosing instead to sing and play the organ at Leland Baptist Church in Detroit. The recording Bealmear uncovered in the Folklore Archives captures Wallace demoing T.B. Blues in her living room in 1965, prior to her professional comeback in 1966. Bealmear also shares a clip from an April 18, 1965 WDTM interview with American Delta blues singer and guitarist Son House, recorded when he performed at the DeRoy Auditorium at Wayne State University in Detroit. In the excerpt, House tells the story of discouraging a man named Robert from playing the guitar due to poor skill — a man who turned out to be famed blues musician Robert Johnson.

    Bealmear also promotes an upcoming concert featuring Detroit’s “Soul Ambassador” Melvin Lincoln Davis and Dennis Coffey, R&B and soul guitarist for the Motown Records Funk Brothers studio band. The concert will be held in the atrium of the Reuther Library on January 23, 2020 on the stage of the historic Bluebird Inn, restored and on loan from the Detroit Sound Conservancy. Doors open at 6 p.m.

    Related Collections

    Folklore Archive: Studies and Research Projects

    Folklore Archive: Student Field Projects Records

    Folklore Archive: Student Field Projects Photographs

    Sippie Wallace, T.B. Blues, 1965

    Son House, WDTM interview, April 18, 1965 (excerpt #1)

    Son House, WDTM interview, April 18, 1965 (excerpt #2)

    More Information

    Detroit Sound Conservancy

    Dennis Coffey

    Episode Credits

    Producers: Dan Golodner and Troy Eller English

    Interviewer: Dan Golodner

    Interviewee: Bart Bealmear

    Sound: Troy Eller English

    Image: Sippie Wallace, Walter P. Reuther Library, Virtual Motor City project: vmc49649_1

    With support from the Reuther Podcast Collective: Bart Bealmear, Elizabeth Clemens, Meghan Courtney, Troy Eller English, Dan Golodner, and Paul Neirink

    • 22 min
    Hidden in the Fields: Invisible Agricultural Child Labor in the American Southwest and the Limits of Citizenship

    Hidden in the Fields: Invisible Agricultural Child Labor in the American Southwest and the Limits of Citizenship

    Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez explains how labor laws helped define the modern boundaries of childhood and citizenship for both internationally and domestically migrant Latinx children working on American farms. Despite the child labor ban supposedly implemented in 1938 as part of the Fair Labor Standards Act and later laws, legal loopholes have allowed migrant Latinx children to continue to work on American farms today and have limited their access to education. Padilla-Rodríguez explains how advocates fought to enact social welfare initiatives for farmworking children along their migratory route, while teachers and women UFW organizers pursued legislative channels to try to get stricter child labor protections, and special educational and childcare programs created for migrant youth. Padilla-Rodríguez is a Ph.D. candidate in the Columbia University Department of History and a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley’s Latinx Research Center.

    Related Collections

    Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee Records

    Dolores Huerta Papers

    Michigan Farm Worker Ministry Coalition Records

    National Farm Workers Association Records

    National Farm Worker Ministry Records

    Ronald B. Taylor Papers

    UFW Organizing Committee (UFWOC) Records

    UFW Office of the President: Cesar Chavez Records

    UFW Texas Records

    Episode Credits

    Producers: Dan Golodner and Troy Eller English

    Interviewer: Dan Golodner

    Interviewee: Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez

    Sound: Troy Eller English

    With support from the Reuther Podcast Collective: Bart Bealmear, Elizabeth Clemens, Meghan Courtney, Troy Eller English, Dan Golodner, and Paul Neirink

    • 31 min
    Punishing Promise: School Discipline in the Era of Desegregation

    Punishing Promise: School Discipline in the Era of Desegregation

    Matt Kautz explains how his observations while teaching in Detroit and Chicago led him to study the rise of suspensions and other disciplinary tactics in urban districts during school desegregation, fueling the school-to-prison pipeline. His research has focused particularly on Boston, Detroit, and Louisville during court-ordered desegregation, for which there is ample documentation of school disciplinary codes, statistics on usage against students, and responses from administrators, teachers, law enforcement, and the community. Kautz is a Ph.D. candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University

    Related Collections

    AFT Local 231: Detroit Federation of Teachers Records

    Detroit Commission on Community Relations (DCCR) / Human Rights Department Records

    Detroit Public Schools Community Relations Division Records

    Wayne State University College of Education, Dean’s Office: Detroit Public Schools Monitoring Commission on Desegregation Records

    Episode Credits

    Producers: Dan Golodner and Troy Eller English

    Interviewer: Dan Golodner

    Interviewees: Matt Kautz

    Sound: Troy Eller English

    With support from the Reuther Podcast Collective: Bart Bealmear, Elizabeth Clemens, Meghan Courtney, Troy Eller English, Dan Golodner, and Paul Neirink

    • 23 min
    Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir of Wobbly Organizer Matilda Rabinowitz Robbins (Part 2)

    Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir of Wobbly Organizer Matilda Rabinowitz Robbins (Part 2)

    In the second of a two-episode series, artist Robbin Légère Henderson discusses the life of her grandmother, Matilda Rabinowitz Robbins, a Socialist, IWW organizer, feminist, writer, mother, and social worker. Henderson shares stories from Robbins’ autobiography, Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir from the Early Twentieth Century, explaining how the optimism of a 13-year-old immigrant from the Ukraine was soon undone by the realities of working in garment sweatshops on the East Coast, leading to Matilda Robbins’ brief but influential role as labor organizer for the International Workers of the World from 1912 to 1917.

    Related Resources

    Exhibit Announcement: “Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman”

    Blog: Love Letters

    Book: Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir from the Early Twentieth Century

    robbinhenderson.com

    Related Collections

    Matilda Robbins Papers

    Industrial Workers of the World Records

    Ben Légère Papers

    John Beffel Papers

    Episode Credits

    Producers: Dan Golodner and Troy Eller English

    Interviewer: Dan Golodner

    Interviewees: Robbin Légère Henderson

    Sound: Troy Eller English

    With support from the Reuther Podcast Collective: Bart Bealmear, Elizabeth Clemens, Meghan Courtney, Troy Eller English, Dan Golodner, and Paul Neirink

    • 27 min
    Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir of Wobbly Organizer Matilda Rabinowitz Robbins (Part 1)

    Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir of Wobbly Organizer Matilda Rabinowitz Robbins (Part 1)

    In the first of a two-episode series, artist Robbin Légère Henderson discusses her exhibition of original scratchboard drawings featured in the illustrated and annotated autobiography of Henderson’s grandmother, Matilda Rabinowitz Robbins, a Socialist, IWW organizer, feminist, writer, mother, and social worker. Henderson shares stories from Robbins’ autobiography, Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir from the Early Twentieth Century, explaining how the optimism of a 13-year-old immigrant from the Ukraine was soon undone by the realities of working in garment sweatshops on the East Coast, leading to Matilda Robbins’ brief but influential role as labor organizer for the International Workers of the World from 1912 to 1917.

    Related Resources

    Exhibit Announcement: “Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman”

    Blog: Love Letters

    Book: Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir from the Early Twentieth Century

    robbinhenderson.com

    Related Collections

    Matilda Robbins Papers

    Industrial Workers of the World Records

    Ben Légère Papers

    John Beffel Papers

    Episode Credits

    Producers: Dan Golodner and Troy Eller English

    Interviewer: Dan Golodner

    Interviewees: Robbin Légère Henderson

    Sound: Troy Eller English

    With support from the Reuther Podcast Collective: Bart Bealmear, Elizabeth Clemens, Meghan Courtney, Troy Eller English, Dan Golodner, and Paul Neirink

    • 24 min
    “You Do It and You Teach It”: 90 Years of Dance at Wayne State

    “You Do It and You Teach It”: 90 Years of Dance at Wayne State

    Eva Powers, recently retired associate professor and former chair of the Maggie Allesee Department of Dance, share the fascinating history and bright future of the modern dance program at Wayne State University. One of the longest-running dance programs in the country, it traces its origins to the Dance Workshop, founded in 1928 by Professor Ruth Lovell Murray. A pioneer in dance education, Murray’s philosophy, “You do it and you teach it,” was evidenced by the Dance Workshop’s influence on a robust dance program within the Detroit Public Schools well into the 1970s. Powers also describes the bright future of the dance program at Wayne State, with state-of-the-art facilities, an impressive roster of alumni renown as much for their teaching as for their artistry, and well-respected faculty drawing more students to dance than ever before.

    Reuther Library archivist Aimee Ergas discusses the photographs, videos, choreographic notes, and other documents contained within the Wayne State Dance Department Records, as well as other robust collections contained within the Michigan Dance Archive at the Walter P. Reuther Library, including the personal papers and teaching notes of Harriet Berg, Denise Szykula, and Genevieve Siegel Schoenberg.

    Related Resources

    Michigan Dance Archives at the Reuther Library

    Related Collections

    Wayne State University Dance Department Records

    Dance Oral Histories

    Detroit Recreation Department Dance Program: Shirley Harbin Records

    Michigan Dance Archives: Leslie O’Day Benyo Papers

    Michigan Dance Archives: Harriet Berg Papers

    Michigan Dance Archives: Marygrove College Department of Dance Records

    Michigan Dance Archives: Genevieve Siegel Schoenberger Papers

    Michigan Dance Archives: Denise Szykula Papers

    Episode Credits

    Producers: Dan Golodner and Troy Eller English

    Interviewer: Dan Golodner

    Interviewees: Eva Powers and Aimee Ergas

    Sound: Troy Eller English

    With support from the Reuther Podcast Collective: Bart Bealmear, Elizabeth Clemens, Meghan Courtney, Troy Eller English, Dan Golodner, and Paul Neirink

    • 34 min

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