154 episódios

Research in Medicine needs to ultimately translate into better treatment of patients. Researchers at the Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, collaborate to develop better care and improved preventive measures. Findings in the laboratory are translated into changes in clinical practice, from Bench to Bedside.

Translational Medicine Oxford University

    • Cursos

Research in Medicine needs to ultimately translate into better treatment of patients. Researchers at the Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, collaborate to develop better care and improved preventive measures. Findings in the laboratory are translated into changes in clinical practice, from Bench to Bedside.

    • video
    Molecular diagnosis and bacterial genotyping

    Molecular diagnosis and bacterial genotyping

    Dr Janjira Thaipadungpanit from our MORU unit in Bangkok, Thailand, tells us about her research on molecular diagnosis and bacterial genotyping A molecular microbiologist, Dr Janjira’s research focusses on using bacterial typing based on genome to confirm which disease is present in a patient. She aims to develop a single whole genome sequence type test using mutliple-PCR assays that can determine from a single sample of blood what bacteria or viruses are present in a patient’s blood – thereby speeding up diagnosis and potentially saving lives in resource-limited settings.
    Head of Molecular Microbiology at MORU, Dr Janjira Thaipadungpanit’s research interests include the molecular epidemiology of leptospirosis and melioidosis using multilocus sequence typing or genome data and molecular diagnosis to identify the causes of acute febrile illness and sepsis in patients. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min
    • video
    Biomarkers for tropical diseases

    Biomarkers for tropical diseases

    Dr Markus Winterbert from our MORU unit in Bangkok, Thailand, tells us about his research on biomarkers for tropical diseases Having a background in malaria physiology and biochemistry, Markus Winterberg’s research focus is on the interaction between host, pathogen and drug, the metabolism of antimalarial drugs and discovering biomarkers for tropical diseases. Markus aims to use these biomarkers to develop non-invasive, field-based rapid diagnostic tests for tropical diseases that quickly identify pathogens, thereby improving diagnostics and the treatment of patients.
    Dr Markus Winterberg is Head of Laboratory and a Principal Investigator in MORU’s Department of Clinical Pharmacology. The key aspect of his research is ‘trop-med-omics’, the application of mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis in tropical medicine, particularly using proteomics and metabolomics to identify a disease in a patient. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 5 min
    • video
    MORU Biosafety Level 3 and melioidosis in Thailand

    MORU Biosafety Level 3 and melioidosis in Thailand

    Premjit Amornchai from our MORU unit in Bangkok, Thailand, tells us about her work as biosafety level 3 lab manager and microbioogy safety officer To prevent relapse or reinfection, melioidosis requires a specific and prolonged treatment. Melioidosis is endemic at least 45 countries, but greatly under-reported, with a microbiological culture required to confirm diagnosis. This can take 2-7 days. In Thailand, up to 40 percent of hospital admitted melioidosis patients die. Premjit works with MORU researchers who have produced a rapid diagnostic test that aims to improve both diagnosis and public awareness of melioidosis.
    Microbiologist Premjit Amornchai heads MORU’s Bio-Safety Level (BSL) 3 Laboratory in Bangkok, Thailand. Safety is very important for Premjit. The BSL3 Lab handles several dangerous materials, most notably, Burkholderia pseudomallei, a highly pathogenic bacterium commonly found in soil and water in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. The pathogen causes the difficult to diagnose, deadly bacterial infection melioidosis. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min
    • video
    Malaria control in Africa

    Malaria control in Africa

    Professor Bob Snow from our KEMRI-Wellcome programme in Nairobi, Kenya, tells us how his research brings together epidemiological profiles and government policies to maximise malaria control programmes in Africa Quality data is vital to design better malaria control programmes. This project helps various African countries gather epidemiological evidence to better control malaria. Professor Bob Snow showed how sub-regional, evidence-based platforms can effectively change malaria treatment policies.
    Professor Bob Snow has developed a large programme of work on the phenotype of malaria disease, its relationship to parasite exposure and its wider public health burden.
    Technical advisor to the Kenyan Government (and member of a number of international malaria advisory panels), Professor Snow provides the bridge between basic malaria epidemiology and malaria control policy in the region.
    Malaria control in Africa. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min
    • video
    Malaria elimination in the Greater Mekong sub-region

    Malaria elimination in the Greater Mekong sub-region

    Dr Lorenz von Seidlein from our MORU unit in Bangkok, Thailand, tells us about his research on malaria elimination in the Greater Mekong sub-region Multidrug resistant P. falciparum malaria is now established in parts of Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, causing high treatment failure rates for artemisinin combination therapies, the main falciparum malaria medicines.
    A further spread from Myanmar to India then sub-Saharan Africa would be a global public health disaster. TME seeks the best ways to eliminate drug-resistant malaria, using both technical solutions and novel ways that engage entire communities.
    Dr Lorenz von Seidlein coordinates MORU’s Targeted Malaria Elimination (TME) study, which seeks to eliminate artemisinin resistant falciparum malaria by treating entire communities that have significant levels of subclinical malaria parasite infections and transmission with the antimalarial Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PIP). Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 5 min
    • video
    Tracking infections

    Tracking infections

    Professor Derrick Crook from our Experimental Medicine division tells us about his research on tracking infections Professor Derrick Crook's research consortium focusses on translating new molecular technologies and advances in informatics into the investigation of microbial transmission, diagnosis of infectious disease and identifying outbreaks of communicable disease. This research aims to translate deep sequencing of pathogens on an epidemiological scale for tracking infections, and is focussed on four different major pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA), Clostridium difficile, Norovirus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Understanding how an infection spreads is vitally important for prevention. Whole genome sequencing of microorganisms allows us to construct family trees of infections, from donnor to recipients, and understand how microbes behave in general. Through its genetic code, we can also predict whether a germ is susceptible or resistant to a specific antibiotic, and give patients a more stratified and personalised treatment. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min

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