4 episódios

Evan Sorensen talks about all the people, places and things that make Utah unique. Listen as he interviews locals both known and unknown, shines light on local folklore, and I can't think of anything else so you should stop reading this because it is just rambling in order to fill this up and see what it looks like non different devices, so, yeah! [ .m4a Enhanced Episode Format ]

Unique Utah - Podcast Evan Sorensen | @utahevan

    • Sociedade e cultura

Evan Sorensen talks about all the people, places and things that make Utah unique. Listen as he interviews locals both known and unknown, shines light on local folklore, and I can't think of anything else so you should stop reading this because it is just rambling in order to fill this up and see what it looks like non different devices, so, yeah! [ .m4a Enhanced Episode Format ]

    Ep. 03: "The Great Saltair, Utah" - Unique Utah

    Ep. 03: "The Great Saltair, Utah" - Unique Utah

    Description – In 1893 the Mormon church built Saltair on the south shore of the Great Salt Lake, about sixteen miles from downtown Salt Lake City. They also built the railroad connecting the resort with the city. The church owned the resort until 1906, at which time it was sold to a group of private Mormon businessmen. The architect of Saltair was Richard K.A. Kletting, perhaps Utah's foremost architect at the turn of the century and the designer of the Utah State Capitol building.

    In building Saltair the Mormon Church had two major objectives: in the words of Mormon apostle Abraham H. Cannon, they wanted to provide "a wholesome place of recreation" under church control for Mormons and their families; and they also intended that Saltair be a "Coney Island of the West" to help demonstrate that Utah was not a strange place of alien people and customs. This was part of a larger movement toward accommodation with American society that had begun in the early 1890s as church leaders made a conscious decision to bring the church into the mainstream of American life. Saltair was to be both a typical American amusement park and a place that provided a safe environment for Mormon patrons. Those goals were somewhat incompatible, and in less than a decade the second had clearly triumphed at the expense of the first. Nonetheless, initially Saltair signified the Mormon Church's intention to join the world while at the same time trying to minimize its influence and avoid its excesses.

    Don't forget to follow us @FrySaucebossdesign on Twitter and also like us on FaceBook

    [ This episode has interactive content on www.frysaucebossdesign.com/blog/saltair - 360 panoramas, videos and pictures]


    : : Show Summary : :


    Evan Sorensen discusses The Great Saltair SLC – In 1893 the Mormon church built Saltair on the south shore of the Great Salt Lake, about sixteen miles from downtown Salt Lake City. They also built the railroad connecting the resort with the city. The church owned the resort until 1906, at which time it was sold to a group of private Mormon businessmen. The architect of Saltair was Richard K.A. Kletting, perhaps Utah's foremost architect at the turn of the century and the designer of the Utah State Capitol building.

    In building Saltair the Mormon Church had two major objectives: in the words of Mormon apostle Abraham H. Cannon, they wanted to provide "a wholesome place of recreation" under church control for Mormons and their families; and they also intended that Saltair be a "Coney Island of the West" to help demonstrate that Utah was not a strange place of alien people and customs. This was part of a larger movement toward accommodation with American society that had begun in the early 1890s as church leaders made a conscious decision to bring the church into the mainstream of American life. Saltair was to be both a typical American amusement park and a place that provided a safe environment for Mormon patrons. Those goals were somewhat incompatible, and in less than a decade the second had clearly triumphed at the expense of the first. Nonetheless, initially Saltair signified the Mormon Church's intention to join the world while at the same time trying to minimize its influence and avoid its excesses.


    Thanks for listening!

    : : Show Notations : :


    Hosted by Evan Sorensen from his sh*tty little apartment in SLC, Utah

    Visit frysaucebossdesign.com for more information

    Copyright: © 2015 FrySauce Boss Design | Unique Utah | All rights reserved

    • 8 min
    Ep. 02: "The Gilgal Sculpture Garden" - Unique Utah

    Ep. 02: "The Gilgal Sculpture Garden" - Unique Utah

    Description – Evan Sorensen discusses The Gilgal Sculpture Garden in downtown SLC, a small public city park, located at 749 East 500 South in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. The park, which is filled with unusual symbolic statuary associated with Mormonism, notably to the Sphinx with Joseph Smith's head, was a labor of love designed and created by LDS businessman Thomas Battersby Child, Jr. (1888-1963) in his spare time. The park contains 12 original sculptures and over 70 stones engraved with scriptures, poems and literary texts. Gilgal Sculpture Garden is the only designated "visionary art environment" in the state of Utah.

    Don't forget to follow us @FrySaucebossdesign on Twitter and also like us on FaceBook

    [ This episode has interactive content on www.frysaucebossdesign.com/blog/gilgal - 360 panoramas, videos and pictures]

    : : Show Summary : :

    Evan Sorensen discusses The Gilgal Sculpture Garden in downtown SLC, a small public city park, located at 749 East 500 South in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. The park, which is filled with unusual symbolic statuary associated with Mormonism, notably to the Sphinx with Joseph Smith's head, was a labor of love designed and created by LDS businessman Thomas Battersby Child, Jr. (1888-1963) in his spare time. The park contains 12 original sculptures and over 70 stones engraved with scriptures, poems and literary texts. Gilgal Sculpture Garden is the only designated "visionary art environment" in the state of Utah.

    Thomas Child, a masonry contractor and Bishop of the 10th Salt Lake LDS ward, conceived of a symbolic sculpture garden that would be a retreat from the world and a tribute to his most cherished religious and personal beliefs. He began building the garden in the back yard of his family home in 1947, when he was 57 years old, and continued to pour his time and money into the work until his death in 1963. Child named the garden Gilgal after the Biblical location where Joshua ordered the Israelites to place twelve stones as a memorial. The name "Gilgal" is sometimes translated to mean "circle of standing stones," an appropriate appellation for a sculpture garden. Gilgal is also the name of a city and a valley in The Book of Mormon, a sacred scripture in Mormonism.

    Although Child was not a classically trained artist, he went to great lengths to obtain and shape the perfect stones for his beloved garden. He created a complete workshop in his yard for handling and cutting the stones, proudly stating that all the finish work for his statues was completed on the site. He also used some unconventional tools to cut the stones, including an oxyacetylene torch (usually used for welding). Besides help from his son-in-law Bryant Higgs, Child hired Maurice Edmunds Brooks to help with the Gilgal project.

    Thanks for listening!

    : : Show Notations : :


    Hosted by Evan Sorensen from his sh*tty little apartment in SLC, Utah

    Visit frysaucebossdesign.com for more information

    Copyright: © 2015 FrySauce Boss Design | Unique Utah | All rights reserved

    • 12 min
    Ep. 01: "Top 5 Movies Filmed in Utah" - Unique Utah

    Ep. 01: "Top 5 Movies Filmed in Utah" - Unique Utah

    Evan Sorensen discusses his top 5 list of movies filmed in Utah. This is just a Practice episode. I am not into creating podcast shows I only did it to fulfill the assignment requirements. This is also filler text instead of using lorem ipsum I am just saying stupid things to fill it up.

    Don't forget to follow us @frysaucebossdesign on Twitter and also Like us on facebook

    [ If you disagree with this Top list, come discuss it on our blog www.frysaucebossdesign.com ]

    : : Show Summary : :

    Joining us today in the sh*tty little apartment is...No One

    This is just a Practice episode. I am not into creating podcast shows I only did it to fulfill the assignment requirements. This is also filler text instead of using lorem ipsum I am just saying stupid things to fill it up.

    What else can I say about a top 5 list without listing the movies? --Well, this description is looking a bit barren so, I'll just go ahead and list them!

    Number 5 - Con Air
    Number 4 - The Paper Brigaide
    Number 3 - Footloose
    Number 2 - Dumb and Dumber
    Number 1 - The Sand Lot

    There you go, you've ruined the surprise! Now you don't need to listen to the podcast!

    Thanks for listening!

    : : Show Notations : :

    Hosted by Evan Sorensen from his sh*tty little apartment in SLC, Utah

    Visit frysaucebossdesign.com for more information

    Copyright: © 2015 FrySauce Boss Design | Unique Utah | All rights reserved

    • 15 min
    Design Document - Unique Utah

    Design Document - Unique Utah

    This is the design document for my podcasts.

    Visit frysaucebossdesign.com for more information

    Copyright: © 2015 FrySauce Boss Design | Unique Utah | All rights reserved

    Visit frysaucebossdesign.com for more information

    Copyright: © 2015 FrySauce Boss Design | Unique Utah | All rights reserved

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