491 episodes

Each week, Sam Sanders interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders NPR

    • Society & Culture

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Each week, Sam Sanders interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    'Go Back to Where You Came From: And Other Helpful Recommendations' from Wajahat Ali

    'Go Back to Where You Came From: And Other Helpful Recommendations' from Wajahat Ali

    Sam chats with author Wajahat Ali about his new book, Go Back To Where You Came From: And Other Helpful Recommendations on Becoming American. The book points out just how hilarious, untenable, and difficult becoming American can actually be. Throughout the book, Ali uses his own story to offer strategies to make America more welcoming and compassionate.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

    • 29 min
    Remembering André Leon Talley

    Remembering André Leon Talley

    André Leon Talley became a major part of the global fashion zeitgeist while navigating being one of the few, if not the only, Black, queer man at his level. Sam is joined by author and poet Saeed Jones and Zach Stafford, host of the podcast In the Deep, to remember the late fashion editor and celebrate Talley's legacy.

    Read Saeed Jones' essay on André Leon Talley here.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

    • 46 min
    The legacy of ACT UP and its fight to end AIDS

    The legacy of ACT UP and its fight to end AIDS

    Sam revisits his 2021 conversation with Sarah Schulman about ACT UP. The organization united a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. In Schulman's book, Let The Record Show: A Political History of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993, she draws from nearly 200 interviews with ACT UP members to document the movement's history and explore how the group's activism transformed the way the media, the government, corporations and medical professionals talked about AIDS and provided treatment. Schulman and Sam discuss this transformation and its relevance to social movements today.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

    • 47 min
    The financial aid conspiracy; plus, 'For Colored Nerds'

    The financial aid conspiracy; plus, 'For Colored Nerds'

    A group of elite colleges and universities this week found themselves at the center of a lawsuit alleging that they conspired to limit financial aid to admitted students. Sam talks to Washington Post higher education reporter Danielle Douglas-Gabriel about the lawsuit and what it means for students and families across the country. Plus, Eric Eddings and Brittany Luse join Sam to talk about the era of Black abundance in media and their revamped podcast, For Colored Nerds.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

    • 35 min
    It's still Trump's GOP

    It's still Trump's GOP

    Former President Donald Trump is still one of the most influential members of the Republican party even after leaving office nearly a year ago. Sam chats with Vann R. Newkirk II, senior editor for The Atlantic, and McKay Coppins, staff writer for The Atlantic, to make sense of what Trump's GOP has been up to this past year — and its strategies going into the next elections.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

    • 28 min
    Revisiting the January 6 insurrection, one year later

    Revisiting the January 6 insurrection, one year later

    It's been a full year since the January 6, 2021 insurrection on the U.S. Capitol, perhaps the most shocking political event of the past year — or even this generation. But has our understanding of the insurrection changed with time? Sam chats with Hannah Allam, national security reporter at The Washington Post, and Tom Dreisbach, NPR investigative correspondent, about how the U.S. government has responded to the insurrection — and how we've moved from political polarization into political radicalization.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

    • 29 min

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