1 hr 18 min

150 How To Find Meaning After Pain with Natasha Levai The Storied Recipe

    • Food

I'm very grateful to welcome Natasha Levai to the podcast today. I'm not going to say much by way of introduction for Natasha for the simple reason that she expresses herself so poignantly and more eloquently than I could. Natasha, who is half Ukrainian and half Russian, speaks to us today from her new home in Hungary, where she and her husband are raising their baby girl and investing their free time and energy into caring for orphans. Natasha's childhood was lonely and difficult, but her story is about finding, receiving, and then giving away love.



Natasha's recipe is a first for The Storied Recipe. Russian Pelmini is a laborious hand-rolled dumpling, very similar to the pierogi. But Natasha was clear on the fact that no one had time to make these, least of all her family. So Natasha's recipe comes frozen, from a bag, just like - if we're honest - many of the foods we've eaten when there wasn't enough time, energy, or money to go around. But frozen Pelmeni was still a food that brought comfort and nourishment in dark times, and I'm glad Natasha was willing to say this. Finally, she'll share about a chapter in her story where someone did take the time, energy, and love to make her handmade Pelmini and fresh Borscht.



Like her recipe, Natasha's story is realistic, raw, and authentic. She reminds us that there is hope - so much hope, in this world and the next - but that hope doesn't come to us in the form of an after school special. Hope and love come to us in the form of sacrifice and persistence. It's a powerful story and one I feel, again, so very very grateful to Natasha for sharing. Welcome, Natasha - and welcome to all of you - to The Storied Recipe Podcast.



Highlights




Trust and testing when working with orphans



Conditions of orphanages in Hungary



Why Natasha sticks with it



How not to get burnt out



Why her father served in the Russian military



The moment she lost all trust in her father



How she began going to church - "I don't know if it was God or the experience of being loved."



Why she left home at 18



How Natasha healed



How Natasha experiences the love of God



Hungarian food culture vs. Russian food culture (food and otherwise)



Sweet pasta in Hungary



"You realize you've become a 'green' person - a 3rd culture person."








Listen to Natasha Now









How to Contact Natasha



Natasha's Food Blog (with a gluten-free emphasis): www.NatashasHome.com



Follow Natasha on Instagram



Follow Natasha on Facebook



Follow Natasha on Pinterest



Follow Natasha on YouTube





More Episodes with Eastern European Guests





More Eastern European Recipes

I'm very grateful to welcome Natasha Levai to the podcast today. I'm not going to say much by way of introduction for Natasha for the simple reason that she expresses herself so poignantly and more eloquently than I could. Natasha, who is half Ukrainian and half Russian, speaks to us today from her new home in Hungary, where she and her husband are raising their baby girl and investing their free time and energy into caring for orphans. Natasha's childhood was lonely and difficult, but her story is about finding, receiving, and then giving away love.



Natasha's recipe is a first for The Storied Recipe. Russian Pelmini is a laborious hand-rolled dumpling, very similar to the pierogi. But Natasha was clear on the fact that no one had time to make these, least of all her family. So Natasha's recipe comes frozen, from a bag, just like - if we're honest - many of the foods we've eaten when there wasn't enough time, energy, or money to go around. But frozen Pelmeni was still a food that brought comfort and nourishment in dark times, and I'm glad Natasha was willing to say this. Finally, she'll share about a chapter in her story where someone did take the time, energy, and love to make her handmade Pelmini and fresh Borscht.



Like her recipe, Natasha's story is realistic, raw, and authentic. She reminds us that there is hope - so much hope, in this world and the next - but that hope doesn't come to us in the form of an after school special. Hope and love come to us in the form of sacrifice and persistence. It's a powerful story and one I feel, again, so very very grateful to Natasha for sharing. Welcome, Natasha - and welcome to all of you - to The Storied Recipe Podcast.



Highlights




Trust and testing when working with orphans



Conditions of orphanages in Hungary



Why Natasha sticks with it



How not to get burnt out



Why her father served in the Russian military



The moment she lost all trust in her father



How she began going to church - "I don't know if it was God or the experience of being loved."



Why she left home at 18



How Natasha healed



How Natasha experiences the love of God



Hungarian food culture vs. Russian food culture (food and otherwise)



Sweet pasta in Hungary



"You realize you've become a 'green' person - a 3rd culture person."








Listen to Natasha Now









How to Contact Natasha



Natasha's Food Blog (with a gluten-free emphasis): www.NatashasHome.com



Follow Natasha on Instagram



Follow Natasha on Facebook



Follow Natasha on Pinterest



Follow Natasha on YouTube





More Episodes with Eastern European Guests





More Eastern European Recipes

1 hr 18 min