28 episodes

Arctic Canada and the Culture Cure is a podcast all about the Canadian Arctic, the land, the people, the culture and what it can teach the rest of the world. Canada's Arctic continues to hold the world spellbound. Twenty-four hours of darkness in winter, to twenty-four hours of daylight in summer, temperatures as extreme as -84 F, walrus, muskox, polar bear, narwhal, and indigenous peoples, rich in culture and tradition that have survived the test of time. Through interviews with prominent community members, elders, hunters, politicians, artists, musicians and sports figures, we will explore tradition, retention and revitalization of culture, colonialism, residential school, climate change, and much more.Production and technical support provided by Shushiela Appavoo.

Arctic Canada - The Culture Cure Rob Feagan

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.5 • 10 Ratings

Arctic Canada and the Culture Cure is a podcast all about the Canadian Arctic, the land, the people, the culture and what it can teach the rest of the world. Canada's Arctic continues to hold the world spellbound. Twenty-four hours of darkness in winter, to twenty-four hours of daylight in summer, temperatures as extreme as -84 F, walrus, muskox, polar bear, narwhal, and indigenous peoples, rich in culture and tradition that have survived the test of time. Through interviews with prominent community members, elders, hunters, politicians, artists, musicians and sports figures, we will explore tradition, retention and revitalization of culture, colonialism, residential school, climate change, and much more.Production and technical support provided by Shushiela Appavoo.

    Arctic Adaptation-As the Climate Changes Is It All Bad? An Interview With Dr. Isla Myers-Smith

    Arctic Adaptation-As the Climate Changes Is It All Bad? An Interview With Dr. Isla Myers-Smith

    Climate change is affecting the Canadian Arctic at a much faster rate than other parts of the planet. However the Arctic and its peoples have a long history of adaptation and survival. Dr. Isla Myers-Smith is a global change ecologist from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Isla has 12 field seasons under her belt, conducting research in the Arctic and Sub-Antarctic. Dr. Myers-Smith is known for her enthusiasm and energy and she has successfully brought together teams of researchers, including "Team Shrub", with whom she continues to conduct research in the Arctic. 
    Dr. Myers-Smith and Team Shrub study plants and how ecosystems are responding as the planet warms. Using traditional tools and new technology such as drones, they are capturing change on Qikiqtaruk, Hershal Island in the Yukon Territory in Northwest Canada in and around the tundra biome. Isla returned to the Arctic in 2019 with the Greening Arctic Project, capturing hotspots of tundra vegetation change at landscape scales. This research is meant to fill in gaps between on-the-ground ecological monitoring and observations from satellites in space. It is the hope that this project can help predict how plant life will respond to the rapid warming of the Canadian Arctic.
    In this episode we discuss the increasing size of shrubs on Qikiqtaruk and across the Arctic tundra, shore erosion, slumping, animal migration patterns, adaptation of the land and people, the importance of cooperation between science and traditional Inuvialuit knowledge, and what the future of the Arctic may hold.

    • 55 min
    Kevin Koe - A Legacy of Curling Greatness Born in the Canadian Arctic

    Kevin Koe - A Legacy of Curling Greatness Born in the Canadian Arctic

    Kevin Koe has achieved curling greatness on the Canadian and world stage. With four Canadian Championships, two World Championships, and an appearance at the 2018 Olympics he has to be considered one of the greatest Canadian curlers of all time. Kevin comes from a family with a legacy of curling. His father Fred, brother Jamie and sister Kerry are all curlers of note, with national and international accomplishments of their own. However, perhaps not as well known by curling and sport enthusiasts, is Kevin's legacy from a cultural perspective.
    In this episode we discuss with Kevin his last two curling seasons, the effects of COVID-19 on curling and what the game may look like when it returns, changes to Team Koe, Kevin's Gwich'in heritage, and roots in the Mackenzie Delta of the Northwest Territories in the Canadian Arctic, his father Fred and Grandfather Chief Jim Koe and much more.

    • 28 min
    Reclaiming Inuit Identity in the Aftermath of Colonialism Through Artistic Expression-Avianna Mackenzie

    Reclaiming Inuit Identity in the Aftermath of Colonialism Through Artistic Expression-Avianna Mackenzie

    Realistic and diverse representations of Inuit women and their relationships to their bodies is something that Canadian, Iqualuit, Nunavut-based artist Avianna Mackenzie has made a central theme in her digital illustration practice. Creating art that combats colonized views and understandings of womanhood and femininity, Avianna's work is created with a clear message of destigmatization and reinforcement of positive body image. Much of Avianna's work is inspired by interactions she observes and exchanges in on social media, a place where women are both granted agency over their own bodies and representation while simultaniously policed by others who seek to either shame or hyper-sexualize them.
    On this episode we discuss Avianna's connection to her culture, colourism in the Inuit community, the motivation behind Avianna's art, battling the untruths of and misconceptions created by colonialism and religion, the role adopting traditional tattoos has played in Avianna's claiming her identity, challenges facing the Arctic and much more!
    For more information on Avianna's art you can visit "Ulliaq Creations" on facebook and @ulliaq_creations on instagram.  

    • 53 min
    Diving Into The Arctic - Jill Heinerth discusses the shrinking ice coverage in the Arctic

    Diving Into The Arctic - Jill Heinerth discusses the shrinking ice coverage in the Arctic

    Jill Heinerth is an award winning, world renowned Canadian diver, cave diver, author and filmmaker. Her achievements include making TV series for PBS, the National Geographic Channel and BBC. She has consulted on various movies for directors including James Cameron. Jill is the author of the bestseller, INTO THE PLANET - My Life as a Cave Diver and has produced documentaries including We Are Water. Her work with Arctic on the Edge and the recent documentary Under Thin Ice is fascinating. Jill was the first person to dive inside iceberg caves of Antarctic and has penetrated further into an underwater cave system than any woman in history! In this episode we discuss with Jill her evolution as a diver and cave diver, her travels to Ikpiarjuk (Arctic Bay) Nunavut Canada, the importance of Inuit knowledge and wisdom, the shrinking ice coverage of the Arctic regions, the speed of this change, animal feeding cycles out of sync, the importance of Arctic ice in the food chain, the connectivity of humanity, facing our fears and next steps related to climate change, and the implications of COVID-19

    • 40 min
    COVID-Distancing On The Land In The Arctic

    COVID-Distancing On The Land In The Arctic

    Melissa and Daniel Rogers live in Inuvik, Northwest Territories in the Canadian Arctic. Melissa is of Gwich'in and Inuvialuit decent and Daniel is Inuvialuit. Melissa and Daniel were both raised with a close connection to the land and when the COVID crisis struck they didn't wait for the virus to surface in the Arctic, they left town and headed to their traditional camp North of Inuvik. In this episode we discuss why Melissa and Daniel returned to the land, living in a tent in -30 temperatures, harvesting fish and caribou for food, their family histories, climate change in the delta and much more.

    • 39 min
    Tradition Worth Saving, A Future To Prepare For - Iqaluktuuttiaq creates traditional healing programs, modern infrastructure and prepares for COVID-19

    Tradition Worth Saving, A Future To Prepare For - Iqaluktuuttiaq creates traditional healing programs, modern infrastructure and prepares for COVID-19

    The small Canadian Arctic hamlet of Iqaluktuuttiaq (Cambridge Bay) is located on Victoria Island, and lies on the Northwest Passage in the Arctic Ocean. As do other Arctic communities, the hamlet faces many issues such as climate change, food insecurity, overcrowding in houses and now the Coronavirus. Despite these challenges, the community moves forward using traditional camps to heal those with addiction issues, engaging elders to teach traditional skills to the young, while also providing opportunities for the young to develop new strengths such as digital media production and other modern skills. In this episode we speak with Pamela Gross, the mayor of Iqaluktuutiaq, regarding these topics and more.

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Zesty Mordant ,

Excellent!

Excellent, first hand knowledge of a part of the world hardly anyone will ever get to see. The podcasts with Rob”s father are my favourites. Fascinating!

Rifeagan ,

Captivating!

I’m really enjoying this podcast so far! Entertaining and informative. I really enjoy the mixed format in the different people who have been interviewed so far, there is so much to be learned through the experiences, knowledge and stories of others. I cannot wait to hear more!

crawfiddy ,

Excited for what to come

I gave this a listen last night. I’ve lived in northern Canada and been to places Rob speaks of. I’ve just scratched the surface of his experiences. The North is fascinating from both a geographical and people perspective. I am interested to hear more about it from his perspective as well as potential guests. I think this is going to be a podcast that both entertains and educated.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To