47 episodes

Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter of
a 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at The
Ohio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings of
Professor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2006 class.
All of the lectures were recorded live in 100 Stillman Hall on the OSU
Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

Astronomy 161 - Introduction to Solar System Astronomy Richard Pogge

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    • 4.4 • 12 Ratings

Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter of
a 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at The
Ohio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings of
Professor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2006 class.
All of the lectures were recorded live in 100 Stillman Hall on the OSU
Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

    Astronomy 141 Podcast Teaser

    Astronomy 141 Podcast Teaser

    A new podcast, Astronomy 141, Life in the Universe, is available
    for those interested in continuing an exploration of topics in
    modern astronomy.

    Lecture 46: ExoPlanets - Planets around Other Stars

    Lecture 46: ExoPlanets - Planets around Other Stars

    Are there planets around other stars? Are there Earth-like planets
    around other stars? Do any of those harbor life? Intelligent life?
    We'd like to know the answers to all of these questions, and in recent
    years we've made great progress towards at least answering the first.
    To date, more than 200 planets have been found around other stars, most in the
    interstellar neighborhood of the Sun, but a few at great distance. This
    lecture reviews the search for ExoPlanets, discussing the successful
    Doppler Wobble, Transit, and Microlensing techniques. What we have
    found so far are very suprising systems, especially Jupiter-size or
    bigger planets orbiting very close (few hundredths of an AU) from their
    parent stars. The existance of a significant population of so-called
    "Hot Jupiters" may be telling us that planetary migration can be much
    more extreme that we saw in our own Solar System, or that these
    planetary system formed in a very different way than ours. It seems
    appropriate to end this class with more questions than answers, but
    that's where the science becomes most exciting. Recorded 2006 Dec 1 in
    100 Stillman Hall on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 45: Is Pluto a Planet?

    Lecture 45: Is Pluto a Planet?

    What is a planet? Is Pluto a planet? This lecture traces the debate on
    the nature of what it means to be a planet by taking an historical approach,
    looking at how the question has arisen with the discovery of the asteroids and
    later Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. Many of the issued raised at the 2006
    IAU General Assembly meeting were raised two centuries before after the
    discovery of Ceres and Pallas. We will end with the new definition of a
    planet, and why Pluto is better understood as a Dwarf Planet, among the
    two largest objects of the class of small icy bodies of the outer solar
    system, than as the smallest of the planets. Recorded 2006 Nov 30 in
    100 Stillman Hall on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 44: Comets

    Lecture 44: Comets

    Comets are occasional visitors from the icy reaches of the outer Solar
    System. This lecture discusses the orbits, structure, and properties of
    comets, and introduces the "dirty snowball" model of a comet nucleus.
    The end of class was a demo where I created a model of a comet nucleus
    from common household and office materials. Imagine a twisted
    combination of Alton Brown and Emeril Lagasse with a PhD in Astrophysics
    and you get the idea. We were not able to arrange for a videographer to
    come, but we did get some stills before the batteries died on the
    digital camera. The pictures are on the lecture webpage. The lecture
    is slightly abbreviated because we did the student evaluation of
    instruction surveys before class started. Recorded 2006 Nov 29 in 100
    Stillman Hall on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 43: Icy Worlds of the Outer Solar System

    Lecture 43: Icy Worlds of the Outer Solar System

    Beyond the orbit of Neptune is the realm of the icy worlds, ranging in
    size from Triton, the giant moon of Neptune, and the dwarf planets Pluto
    and Eris, all the way down to the nuclei of comets. This lecture
    discussed the icy bodies of the Trans-Neptunian regions of the Solar
    System, discussing the basic properties of Triton (the best studied such
    object), Pluto, Eris, and the Kuiper Belt, introducing the dynamical
    families of Trans-Neptunian Objects that record in their orbits the slow
    migration of Neptune outwards during the early history of the Solar
    System. The Kuiper Belt is the icy analog of the main Asteroid Belt of
    the inner Solar System: both are shaped by their gravitational
    interaction with giant gas planets (Jupiter for the asteroids, Neptune
    for the KBOs), and are composed of leftover raw materials from the
    formation of their respective regions of the Solar System. Recorded
    2006 Nov 28 in 100 Stillman Hall on the Columbus campus of The Ohio
    State University.

    Lecture 42: Asteroids and Meteoroids

    Lecture 42: Asteroids and Meteoroids

    Asteroids are the leftover rocky materials from the formation of the
    Solar System that reside mainly in a broad belt between the orbits of
    Mars and Jupiter. Meteoroids are fragments of asteroids or bits of
    debris from passing comets that occasionally pass through our atmosphere
    as meteors, and even more rarely survive the fiery passage to reach the
    ground as a meteorite. This lecture reviews the physical and dynamical
    (orbital) properties of Asteroids and Meteoroids, and discusses the role
    of Jupiter and orbital resonances in dynamically sculpting the Main
    Belt. Recorded 2006 Nov 27 in 100 Stillman Hall on the Columbus campus
    of The Ohio State University.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

Thai27Dylan ,

Top notch!

This professor, Richard Pogge, definitely has excellent and in-depth astronomy knowledge. He is clear concise and witty. Excellent! I would love to take his class in person!

hrb_vsca ,

Just brilliant

Very easy to follow, always fascinating! Loving this and all his other podcasts.

Starry Expanse ,

Informative, interesting & entertaining

I first listened to this course back in 2008. I then followed with course 162 and later course 141. Richard Pogge put together an entertaining and informative collection of lectures here. In particular I found the history of important astronomers from the past very interesting. If astronomy is a hobby of yours like it is mine, you will be very happy with these podcasts.

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