11 episodes

California Southern University psychology lectures are presented free of charge to the public in the spirit of scholarship and academic achievement. Lectures are held at CalSouthern's Irvine, California campus and students, alumni and the public are invited to attend.

CalSouthern Psychology Lectures California Southern University

    • Social Sciences

California Southern University psychology lectures are presented free of charge to the public in the spirit of scholarship and academic achievement. Lectures are held at CalSouthern's Irvine, California campus and students, alumni and the public are invited to attend.

    • video
    Inside the Mind of a Veteran

    Inside the Mind of a Veteran

    In this presentation, Dr. Joshua Taylor outlines common psychological issues facing veterans from the various military branches, exploring commonalities and differences among them. He begins by addressing the thinking, feeling and behaving aspects of military functioning and military life. This is often overlooked in the therapeutic setting, by the veterans, their families and the therapist. Understanding these important elements can shed light on the issues being addressed. Dr. Taylor also addresses the critical differences and distinctions that separate the veteran from the civilian population, and why recognizing these differences is an important part of successful therapy.

    Learning Objectives:

    After viewing this lecture, participants will be able to:

    Describe the different branches of the military and what their respective roles often are in shaping the psyche of the veteran.
    Understand the roles of cognition, emotion and behavior regarding PTSD and vicarious trauma.
    Identify key concepts that can assist the therapist in treating veterans.
    Explain how and why understanding the “military way of life” is critical to establishing the therapeutic relationship.


    Speeker Bio:

    Dr. Joshua Taylor is a clinical psychologist and currently the regional program manager at the San Bernardino County behavioral health center. He is a published author and has presented to a wide variety of universities, organizations and conferences on issues relating to veterans’ mental health, PTSD and trauma. Dr. Taylor serves as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Phoenix and is considered an expert on trauma. He has provided behavioral health staff training on mental illness, as well as oversight of crisis intervention training for law enforcement programs. In addition, he has been a regional MHSA Housing Program liaison.

    Dr. Taylor is a past member of the Orange County Disaster Response Team and a sworn civilian member of the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department Search and Rescue Team. He also has been recognized by the Orange County Health Care Agency and Orange County Superior Court for his training on veterans’ issues and emergency response activities.

    • 1 hr 29 min
    • video
    Virtual Treatment: Overcoming Barriers to Accessing Treatment

    Virtual Treatment: Overcoming Barriers to Accessing Treatment

    Virtual treatment makes treatment a reality for individuals who are unable to access services otherwise due to barriers such as geography, psychosocial issues, or competing work and family responsibilities. By creating a realistic and immersive virtual office space online, professionals and consumers can meet collaboratively as “avatars” and participants can access individual and group activities in real time.

    At Preferred Family Healthcare, the three-dimensional virtual environment is hosted on a private, protected server, accessible from anywhere via the Internet. This technology has been adapted easily for the provision of treatment to drug court participants and to provide veteran-specific programming. In addition, educational programming for anger management and for individuals charged with driving while intoxicated offenses has demonstrated positive outcomes.

    While the target populations in virtual programming have varied, the results have consistently demonstrated increased retention and engagement during and after treatment, when compared to control group. Virtual programming has demonstrated a great deal of flexibility with regard to being modified easily and effectively to the needs of the population served, while demonstrating positive outcomes.

    Learning Objectives:

    - Recognition of how virtual treatment/services may be utilized to better serve behavior health consumers and overcome barriers to access.

    - An ability to compare virtual counseling outcomes to those of traditional treatment and to determine the effectiveness of virtual treatment.

    - An increased knowledge of what virtual treatment is and how to engage consumers.

    Speaker Bio:
    Kathy Hoppe began her career in the behavioral health field in 1992, after graduating from the University of Missouri – Columbia. She has worked in the juvenile justice system, programs serving at-risk families in home and residential settings, and in the development and provision of behavioral health treatment and education, predominately regarding alcohol and drug addiction.

    Since joining Preferred Family Healthcare she has served in multiple roles, currently as vice president of treatment services. Kathy maintains the credentials of Certified Reciprocal Alcohol and Drug Counselor, Certified Co-Occurring Disorders Professional and Medication Assisted Recovery Specialist. Kathy provides oversight and development for alcohol and drug addiction and other behavioral health programs, as well as technology-assisted service.

    • 1 hr 19 min
    • video
    Working with the Process Dimension in Relational Therapies

    Working with the Process Dimension in Relational Therapies

    Drs. Edward Teyber and Faith McClure Teyber return to California Southern University to continue their discussion about the therapeutic relationship as the vehicle for transformation and change, highlighting critical, core concepts that are widely employed across the relationally oriented therapies.

    In this lecture, the presenters will focus on their recently published article “Working with the Process Dimension in Relational Therapies: Guidelines for Clinical Training,” which explores how process—the “here-and-now interaction between therapist and client”—can be utilized to make these relational treatment modalities more effective. After a short introduction to the topic, Drs. Teyber and McClure Teyber will engage the audience in an interactive discussion that will reveal how the process and process comments often constitute the variable that make relational constructs work, “bringing immediacy and intensity to the therapeutic relationship and giving us a way to enter the client’s distress and engage with their core concerns,” as the authors note in the article.

    Speaker Bios:
    Dr. Edward TeyberDr. Edward Teyber is professor of psychology, director of the psychology clinic and president of the Foundation Board of Directors at California State University, San Bernardino. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from Michigan State University. His work has focused on marital and family relations and child adjustment, child-rearing practices and attachment styles, and the counseling relationship.

    Faith Holmes McClureDr. Faith McClure Teyber is professor of psychology at California State University, San Bernardino. She received her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Her clinical and research interests are multi-cultural issues in mental health, and at-risk children, families, and adults, with particular focus on those who have suffered trauma.

    In addition to the groundbreaking Interpersonal Process in Therapy: An Integrative Model, Drs. Teyber and McClure Teyber also have co-authored Casebook in Child and Adolescent Treatment: Cultural and Familial Contexts. Their texts are studied at colleges and universities nationwide.

    • 1 hr 25 min
    • video
    An Introduction to Forensic Psychology, Part II

    An Introduction to Forensic Psychology, Part II

    This dynamic presentation outlines forensic psychology, utilizing a much broader perspective than what is typically considered. Those only casually familiar with the field of forensic psychology commonly associate it with criminal profiling, serial murder and investigations. However, there are many more aspects to the field that are not typically exposed in the media. Dr. Phan introduces and explores several of these areas of forensic psychology, with special focus on the primary testimonial roles of a forensic psychologist in court, including the psychological batteries conducted by psychologists in expert testimony. She also discusses the evaluation of clients in clinical settings for differential diagnosing.

    Learning Objectives:
    Those who view this lecture will understand and/or be able to identify:

    - The essential tenets of forensic psychology.

    - The primary roles of the psychologist in court.

    - How psychological testing is introduced as a part of expert testimony.

    - The variety of psychological inventories used in the criminal court system.

    Speaker Bio:
    Dr. Nhung Phan earned her BA in psychology from California State University, Fullerton and received both her MA and PsyD in clinical forensic psychology from Alliant International University, in Irvine, California.

    Dr. Phan is currently working as a project lead for the Orange County Community Cares Project, developing the program and building resources to create a collaborative system of private providers who will deliver pro bono mental health services to underserved and unserved individuals.

    She has administered neuropsychological, psychological, intelligence and related mental health assessments for clients referred by Orange County clinics seeking help in diagnostic impressions and treatment plans. In addition, Dr. Phan has practiced at the Juvenile Drug Court in Orange, Calif., administering psychological tests and assessments to determine client eligibility for the court, in addition to conducting therapy with adolescents who were in the program.

    In other roles, Dr. Phan practiced in an elementary school, providing counseling services for students who experienced behavioral or personal problems or difficulties with academics. In addition, she has provided psychotherapy in a clinic setting to geriatric clients suffering from dementia, pain associated with medical conditions and myriad other psychiatric disorders.

    • 1 hr 37 min
    • video
    Parental Alienation: An Attachment-based Model

    Parental Alienation: An Attachment-based Model

    This lecture describes an attachment-based model for understanding the psychological and family processes surrounding what has traditionally been referred to as “parental alienation” in high-conflict divorce. The presentation will cover the family systems origins, the contributing personality disorder factors, and the attachment-system foundations that lead to parental alienation following divorce. A set of three diagnostic indicators in the child’s symptom display will be identified that can reliably identify the presence or absence of parental alienation as the cause of the child’s rejection of a relationship with a parent.

    Learning Objectives:
    Those who view this lecture will be able to:

    - Understand the family systems origins of parental alienation following divorce.

    - Understand how parental personality disorder dynamics create the family processes associated with parental alienation.

    - Understand the origins of parental alienation in disturbances to the alienating parent’s own attachment system.

    - Recognize and describe the three key diagnostic features of an attachment-based model of parental alienation.

    Speaker Bio:
    Dr. Craig Childress is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in child and family therapy, parent-child conflict, marital conflict, and child development. Dr. Childress has an additional background specialty in early childhood mental health involving the attachment system and the neuro-development of the brain during childhood.

    Prior to entering private practice, Dr. Childress served as the clinical director for a children’s assessment and treatment center operated under the auspices of California State University, San Bernardino. He also was on medical staff at Children’s Hospital of Orange County as a pediatric psychologist, where he served on a collaborative project with the UCI Child Development Center regarding the early identification of ADHD in preschool-age children.

    In addition to his private practice, Dr. Childress currently teaches graduate-level courses in child development, diagnosis and psychopathology, psychotherapy and treatment planning, and research methodology through the University of Phoenix. He has written extensively on an attachment-based model of parental alienation on his website (cachildress.org) and blog (drcraigchildressblog.com), and he has served as an expert consultant and witness in legal cases involving “parental alienation” across the United States and Canada.

    • 1 hr 46 min
    • video
    Treatment of Attachment-Based Parental Alienation

    Treatment of Attachment-Based Parental Alienation

    This lecture outlines the diagnosis and treatment of an attachment-based model for the psychological and family processes in high-conflict divorce, traditionally described as “parental alienation.” This is a follow-up presentation to an extremely well-received introduction that described, among other things, the attachment-system foundations that lead to parental alienation. In this presentation, Dr. Childress sets forth a clear framework for diagnosing the presence of attachment-based parental alienation, as well as the components necessary for its effective treatment and resolution.

    Those who view this lecture will learn:

    - The diagnostic framework for identifying when attachment-based parental alienation is, and when it is not, responsible for producing the parent-child conflict involved in high-conflict divorce

    - The four key treatment phases necessary for the effective treatment and resolution of an attachment-based model for parental alienation

    - The essential features of the child’s psychological experience surrounding parental alienation that are key to the child’s therapy and a restoration of the child’s affectional bond with the currently targeted-rejected parent

    - The role of the alienating parent in the child’s treatment and recovery, and approaches to managing and working with the alienating parent during and following treatment

    Speaker Bio:

    Dr. Craig Childress is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in child and family therapy, parent-child conflict, marital conflict, and child development. Dr. Childress has an additional background specialty in early childhood mental health involving the attachment system and the neuro-development of the brain during childhood.

    Prior to entering private practice, Dr. Childress served as the clinical director for a children’s assessment and treatment center operated under the auspices of California State University, San Bernardino. He also was on medical staff at Children’s Hospital of Orange County as a pediatric psychologist, where he served on a collaborative project with the UCI Child Development Center regarding the early identification of ADHD in preschool-age children.

    In addition to his private practice, Dr. Childress currently teaches graduate-level courses in child development, diagnosis and psychopathology, psychotherapy and treatment planning, and research methodology through the University of Phoenix. He has written extensively on an attachment-based model of parental alienation on his website (www.cachildress.org) and blog (drcraigchildressblog.com), and he has served as an expert consultant and witness in legal cases involving parental alienation across the United States and Canada.

    • 1 hr 47 min

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