141 episodes

Dr. Nic Butler, historian at the Charleston County Public Library, explores the less familiar corners of local history with stories designed to educate, entertain, and inspire audiences to reflect on the enduring presence of the past in the Lowcountry of South Carolina.

Charleston Time Machine Nic Butler, CCPL

    • Education

Dr. Nic Butler, historian at the Charleston County Public Library, explores the less familiar corners of local history with stories designed to educate, entertain, and inspire audiences to reflect on the enduring presence of the past in the Lowcountry of South Carolina.

    Episode 141: The South Carolina Revolution of 1719, Part 2

    Episode 141: The South Carolina Revolution of 1719, Part 2

    The secret confederacy that formed in November 1719 assembled as an elected Convention of the people that December. In a showdown with the proprietary government, the Convention staged a bloodless coup d’etat that unhinged the colony’s political landscape. Born of frustration with the Lords Proprietors, the Revolution of 1719 was won at the end of a musket barrel and crowned by the royal approval of King George.

    • 29 min
    Episode 140: The South Carolina Revolution of 1719, Part 1

    Episode 140: The South Carolina Revolution of 1719, Part 1

    Frustrated by years of neglect and contrary government, the citizens of South Carolina asserted their political will in the closing months of 1719 by organizing a rebellious confederacy that descended on Charleston to seize the reins of power. It was a contest enacted exclusively by white men, but the outcome affected the entire population of the faltering colony. Today we’ll follow the chain of events that precipitated the political and military revolt that forms one of the most important, but least remembered, events of this state’s early history.

    • 23 min
    Episode 139: Proprietary vs. Royal Government in Colonial South Carolina

    Episode 139: Proprietary vs. Royal Government in Colonial South Carolina

    South Carolina was an English colony for its first century, but that era was marked by two contrasting periods characterized by different administrations: An initial “proprietary” era gave way to a “royal” government after a rebellion in 1719. To help us appreciate the impact of that uprising, let’s compare the two forms of colonial oversight that motivated one of the most important incidents in our state’s history.

    • 19 min
    Episode 138: Christmas Traditions in Early Charleston

    Episode 138: Christmas Traditions in Early Charleston

    Here in Charleston, we share a number of Christmas customs with communities near and far, but how deep are the Lowcountry roots of our modern holiday traditions? Today we’ll examine a few historic holiday anecdotes that are sure to please and might even serve as morsels of polite dinner conversation during the upcoming Christmas season.

    • 15 min
    Episode 137: The Shady History of Protecting Lowcountry Trees

    Episode 137: The Shady History of Protecting Lowcountry Trees

    Shade-tree history is on my mind this Arbor Day. While some people want to uproot the grand oaks bordering our scenic highways, others have defended the venerable trees from the ravages of modernity. The moss-draped canopy they provide isn’t just picturesque; it’s the manifestation of an ancient law rooted in protecting travelers from highway robbers in Medieval England.

    • 21 min
    Episode 136: The Genesis of the Harleston Neighborhood, 1672–1770

    Episode 136: The Genesis of the Harleston Neighborhood, 1672–1770

    The area called Harleston Village is one of the oldest neighborhoods on the Charleston peninsula, but the present definition of its boundaries differs from its original identity. From colonial grant to bucolic pasture to profitable subdivision, Harleston was annexed into urban Charleston in 1770 and evolved into a desirable address, though it was never technically a village.

    • 35 min

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