24 episodes

The Cite Black Women podcast is a bi-weekly program with a simple message: Cite Black Women. We have been producing knowledge since we blessed this earth. We theorize, we innovate, we revolutionize the world. We do not need mediators. We do not need interpreters. It's time to disrupt the canon. It's time to upturn the erasures of history. It's time to give credit where credit is due. This bi-weekly podcast features reflections and conversations about the politics and praxis of acknowledging and centering Black women’s ideas and intellectual contributions inside and outside of the academy through citation. Episodes feature conversations with Black women inside and outside of the academy who are actively engaged in radical citation as praxis, quotes and reflections on Black women's writing, conversations on weathering the storm of citational politics in the academy, decolonizing syllabi and more. For more information about our project follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @citeblackwomen and access our website at citeblackwomencollective.org #CiteBlackWomen

Producer and Host: Christen Smith
Co-producer: Michaela Machicote
Audio Engineer: Lydia Fortuna

Cite Black Women Podcas‪t‬ Christen Smith

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 4 Ratings

The Cite Black Women podcast is a bi-weekly program with a simple message: Cite Black Women. We have been producing knowledge since we blessed this earth. We theorize, we innovate, we revolutionize the world. We do not need mediators. We do not need interpreters. It's time to disrupt the canon. It's time to upturn the erasures of history. It's time to give credit where credit is due. This bi-weekly podcast features reflections and conversations about the politics and praxis of acknowledging and centering Black women’s ideas and intellectual contributions inside and outside of the academy through citation. Episodes feature conversations with Black women inside and outside of the academy who are actively engaged in radical citation as praxis, quotes and reflections on Black women's writing, conversations on weathering the storm of citational politics in the academy, decolonizing syllabi and more. For more information about our project follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @citeblackwomen and access our website at citeblackwomencollective.org #CiteBlackWomen

Producer and Host: Christen Smith
Co-producer: Michaela Machicote
Audio Engineer: Lydia Fortuna

    S2E10 Black Feminist Physics: A Conversation with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

    S2E10 Black Feminist Physics: A Conversation with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

    In this episode Cite Black Women podcast host Christen Smith sits down with theoretical physicist and feminist theorist Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein to discuss Black feminist physics, the intersections between the matrix of violence against Black women and science, her radical Black feminist upbringing and her forthcoming book, The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey Into Dark Matter, Spacetime, & Dreams Deferred (March 2021, Bold Type Books).

    Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein (she/her) is an Assistant Professor of Physics and Core Faculty Member in Women’s Studies at the University of New Hampshire. She is also a columnist for New Scientist and Physics World. Her research in theoretical physics focuses on cosmology, neutron stars, and dark matter. Using ideas from both physics and astronomy, she responds to deep questions about how everything in the universe got to the be the way it is. She also does research in Black feminist science, technology, and society studies. Essence magazine recognized her as one of “15 Black Women Who Are Paving the Way in STEM and Breaking Barriers.” She has been profiled in several venues, including TechCrunch, Ms. Magazine, Huffington Post, Gizmodo, Nylon, and the African American Intellectual History Society’s Black Perspectives. A cofounder of the Particles for Justice movement, she has received the 2017 LGBT+ Physicists Acknowledgement of Excellence Award for her contributions to improving conditions for marginalized people in physics, as well as the 2021 American Physical Society Edward A. Bouchet Award for her contributions to particle cosmology. She divides her time between the New Hampshire Seacoast, and Cambridge, Massachusetts. You can find Dr. Prescod-Weinstein's full bio can be here: https://www.cprescodweinstein.com

    Follow Chanda Prescod-Weinstein @IBJIYONGI

    To order The Disordered Cosmos: https://www.boldtypebooks.com/titles/chanda-prescod-weinstein/the-disordered-cosmos/9781541724709/

    • 1 hr 11 min
    S2E9: Race, Technology and Abolition - A Conversation with Ruha Benjamin

    S2E9: Race, Technology and Abolition - A Conversation with Ruha Benjamin

    Race is coded into every aspect of our technological lives, from automatic soap dispensers to Zoom calls. In this episode, host Christen Smith sits down with Prof. Ruha Benjamin of Princeton University to her work on racial coding, how racism and technology work hand in hand, and what we can do to create abolitionist futures despite this racism.

    Ruha Benjamin is Associate Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, author of the award-winning book Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code (2019), and founding director of the Ida B. Wells Just Data Lab, which brings together students, activists, artists, and educators to develop a critical and creative approach to data justice. Ruha is also the author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier (2013) and editor of Captivating Technology: Race, Technology, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life (2019), among numerous other publications.

    Ruha Benjamin's website: https://www.ruhabenjamin.com
    Ida B. Wells Just Data Lab: https://www.thejustdatalab.com/about-the-lab

    • 40 min
    S2E8: The Legacy of Andaiye: A Conversation with Alissa Trotz and Nicole Burrowes

    S2E8: The Legacy of Andaiye: A Conversation with Alissa Trotz and Nicole Burrowes

    In this episode, guest host Dr. Nicole Burrowes (Rutgers University) talks with Dr. Alissa Trotz (University of Toronto) about the legacy of Guyanese Black radical feminist organizer and thinker Andaiye. Andaiye was a long time activist and social critic who helped to organize the Working People's Alliance (WPA)and was a founding member of Read Thread. In April 2020, Trotz and Andaiye published a new collection of Andaiye's essays with Pluto Press: The Point is to Change the World. This intimate conversation explore Andaiye's legacy, the stakes of Black political struggle and gender rights, and the genealogy of Black organizing against racism and sexism in Guyana.

    Alissa Trotz is Professor of Caribbean Studies at New College and Director of Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto. She is also affiliate faculty at the Dame Nita Barrow Institute of Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados.  Her research explores social reproduction,  neoliberalisation & feminist activisms; coloniality, racial formations, gendered difference and violence; transnational migration and diaspora. She is editor of the anthology The Point Is to Change the World: Selected Writings by Andaiye (Pluto Press Black Critique Series , 2020: https://www.plutobooks.com/9780745341279/the-point-is-to-change-the-world/). Her current research examines diaspora, indigeneity and extractivism in colonial Guyana. She is editor of “In the Diaspora,” a weekly newspaper column in the Guyanese daily, Stabroek News: https://inthecaribbeandiaspora.wordpress.com/about/; http://www.stabroeknews.com/category/features/in-the-diaspora/

    Nicole Burrowes is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Rutgers University. Her research interests include social justice movements, comparative histories of racialization and colonialism, Black Internationalism, and the politics of solidarity. Her current book project, Seeds of Solidarity: African-Indian Relations and the 1935 Labor Rebellions in British Guiana, explores the historical possibility of a movement forged at the edge of empire in the midst of environmental, political and economic crises. Embedded in Caribbean feminist epistemologies, her work continues the tradition of proposing a framework for solidarity that gains power from recognizing, understanding and incorporating difference into struggle.In 2020, she was awarded two fellowships to support her research agenda: the American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation’s Career Enhancement Fellowship.

    • 49 min
    S2E7: We Must Center Black Trans Women in This Struggle - Imara Jones

    S2E7: We Must Center Black Trans Women in This Struggle - Imara Jones

    In S2E7 of the Cite Black Women podcast Cite Black Women Collective member Erica Williams sits down with journalist, intersectional-news producer, and creator of TransLash, Imara Jones, to discuss her remarkable work celebrating Black trans women's lives, fighting for justice, and imagining a Black trans future.

    Bio: Imara Jones, whose work has won Emmy and Peabody Awards, is the creator of TransLash Media, a cross-platform journalism, personal storytelling and narrative project, which produces content to shift the current culture of hostility towards transgender people in the US. In 2019 she chaired the first-ever UN High Level Meeting on Gender Diversity with over 600 participants. Imara’s work as a host, on-air news analyst, and writer focuses on the full-range of social justice and equity issues. Imara has been featured regularly in The Guardian, The Nation, MSNBC, CNBC, NPR, Mic, Colorlines, and is a frequent guest host of the In The Thick podcast. Imara has held economic policy posts in the Clinton White House and communications positions at Viacom. Imara holds degrees from the London School of Economics and Columbia. Imara is currently a Soros Equality Fellow and on the board of the Anti-violence Project, and the New Pride Agenda. She goes by the pronouns she/her.

    Links:
    TransLash.org
    ImaraJones.com

    • 32 min
    S2E6: Juneteenth and the History of Black Emancipation Days in the U.S, Dr. Melissa Stuckey

    S2E6: Juneteenth and the History of Black Emancipation Days in the U.S, Dr. Melissa Stuckey

    In this episode of the Cite Black Women podcast, Dr. Christen Smith sits down with Dr. Melissa Stuckey to discuss the history of Black emancipation days in the United States, Juneteenth, and the special tone this year's commemoration takes in the wake of the murder of George Floyd. Dr. Stuckey discuss the special connections between George Floyd and Juneteenth in Emancipation Park in Houston, the tradition of Emancipation Days across the country, and why the history of our freedom celebrations has everything to do with our current moment.

    *Erratum! Please note In the podcast Dr. Stuckey mistakenly states that Watchnight Emancipation observation was 1863/1864. It should say 1862/1863.

    Dr. Melissa N. Stuckey is assistant professor of African American history at Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) in North Carolina. She is a specialist in early twentieth century black activism and is committed to engaging the public in important conversations about black freedom struggles in the United States.

    Dr. Stuckey is the author of several book chapters, journal, and magazine articles including “Boley, Indian Territory: Exercising Freedom in the All Black Town,” published in 2017 in the Journal of African American History and "Freedom on Her Own Terms: California M. Taylor and Black Womanhood in Boley, Oklahoma" (forthcoming in This Land is Herland: Gendered Activism in Oklahoma, 1870s to 2010s, edited by Sarah Eppler Janda and Patricia Loughlin, University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

    Stuckey is currently completing her first book, entitled “All Men Up”: Seeking Freedom in the All-Black Town of Boley, Oklahoma, which interrogates the black freedom struggle in Oklahoma as it took shape in the state’s largest all-black town.

    Stuckey is also working on several public history projects. She has been awarded grants from the National Parks Service and the Institute for Museum and Library Services to rehabilitate a historic Rosenwald school on ECSU's campus and to preserve the history and legacy of these important African American institutions.

    In addition, she is a contributing historian on the NEH-funded “Free and Equal Project” in Beaufort, South Carolina, which is interpreting the story of Reconstruction for national and international audiences and is senior historical consultant to the Coltrane Group, a non-profit organization in Oklahoma committed to economic development and historic rehabilitation in the thirteen remaining historically black towns in that state.

    Melissa Stuckey earned her bachelor’s degree from Princeton University and her Ph.D. from Yale University

    • 59 min
    S2E5: Black Women and Health Equity: Spotlight on Black Maternal Health and COVID-19

    S2E5: Black Women and Health Equity: Spotlight on Black Maternal Health and COVID-19

    CBW Collective member Dr. Whitney Pirtle speaks with Dr. Monica McLemore about her career trajectory, moving from her long-time position as a clinical public health nurse to becoming a prominent researcher on Black maternal health and reproductive justice. They discuss the importance of centering and listening to Black women in reaching health equity, and why this matters especially in the current COVID-19 pandemic crises.

    Dr Monica McLemore, a tenured associate professor in the Family Health Care Nursing Department at the University of California, San Francisco, an affiliated scientist with Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health, and a member of the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health.

    Dr. McLemore retired from clinical practice as a public health and staff nurse after a 28-year clinical nursing career. Her research is grounded in reproductive justice across the reproductive spectrum including abortion, birth, cancer risk, contraception, family planning, and healthy sexuality, pleasure, and consent.

    She has over 50 peer reviewed articles, OpEds and commentaries and her research has been cited in places including the Huffington Post, Lavender Health, a National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine report. AND three amicus briefs to the Supreme Court of the United States. She is an elected member of the governing council and chair-elect for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) section of the American Public Health Association. She is recipient of numerous awards and was recently inducted into the American Academy of Nursing in October, 2019.

    Whitney Pirtle PhD is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and affiliated faculty in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies and Public Health at the University of California Merced. Her areas of expertise are in race and nation, racial/ethnic health disparities and equity, Black feminist sociology, and mixed methodologies. Pirtle oversees the Sociology of Health and Equity (SHE) Lab at UC Merced and is a Cite Black Women Collective member.

    • 1 hr 6 min

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