79 episodes

In this weekly podcast, host Maggie Green celebrates cookbook readers, buyers, collectors, and clubs, with interviews and conversations about the role of cookbooks in our lives. Her mission is to build and celebrate a community of people who would rather read, buy, and put on their shelf a cookbook over any other genre of book.

Cookbook Love Podcast Maggie Green

    • Food

In this weekly podcast, host Maggie Green celebrates cookbook readers, buyers, collectors, and clubs, with interviews and conversations about the role of cookbooks in our lives. Her mission is to build and celebrate a community of people who would rather read, buy, and put on their shelf a cookbook over any other genre of book.

    Episode 77: Interview with Personal Chef and Cookbook Writer Elizabeth Weaver

    Episode 77: Interview with Personal Chef and Cookbook Writer Elizabeth Weaver

    Owner and Chef, Elizabeth H. Weaver is a Marietta Native, a fourth-generation Marietta girl to be exact. Her southern roots can be found in many areas of her cooking. But don't peg her as strictly a southern cook. Building your perfect bite is her true goal. 
    Elizabeth is a graduate of the Culinary Business Academy. Her culinary training began at age 13 when her mom decided it was time for her to plan and prepare one meal a week for her family. From there she has read and studied about food as often as possible. Cookbooks are great novels that Chef Elizabeth savors. 
    For the last 29 years she has worked for Cobb County Cultural Affairs Division and has directed dozens of musical theatre productions. All during this time food was interwoven in her work life. It might be preparing meals for a dinner theatre, hors d'oeurves for a gallery opening or relieving the stress of the day by baking at home. Her arts career also makes her an excellent event planner and has given Chef Elizabeth the ability to think outside of the box. 
    Chef Elizabeth's food will remind you of home with a twist. She promises to help you regain time with your family, eat better and in the end enjoy life more by using her service.
    Things We Mention In This Episode:
    Connect with Elizabeth Weaver  
    Download a copy of Cookbook Writing Roadmap  
    Please join Confident Cookbook Writer Facebook Group

    Let’s connect on Instagram @greenapron

    • 38 min
    Episode 76: Being a Cookbook Writer: How to Learn New Things

    Episode 76: Being a Cookbook Writer: How to Learn New Things

    One of the foundational things I teach to all my students inside the Cookbook Writers Academy is the concept of Being a Cookbook Writer. Part of  "being a cookbook writer" (who gets their cookbook published) is your habits. And last week we talked all about the habit of cooking, and writing, and using your kitchen as your laboratory.  This means that you are most likely either cooking (or baking) and writing a lot during the pre-publication phase of writing a cookbook.
    Another foundational part of being a cookbook writer is your willingness to learn new things and to teach yourself new things. And that’s what I want to talk about.
    Every day I'm amazed at technology. We have so many opportunities to teach ourselves how to send a newsletter, write a blog, self-publish our cookbooks, run a webinar, set up a sales page, or start a podcast. And as a cookbook writer, there is so much more to learn.
    The world is a frontier of knowledge, and our brains have an unlimited capacity to learn. There is so much we can teach ourselves about writing, cooking/baking, or being a cookbook writer.
    So how do we get better at... writing? Cooking? Baking? Learning new things? (fill in the blank with whatever you want to teach yourself about)?
    Here are 20 ways to teach yourself new things and enhance your learning:
    Decide to take control and learn about... Read — a lot. Be curious. Watch how-to videos. Thirst for knowledge. Don't just wonder about stuff - find out and then practice. Carry a physical or e-Book with you at all times. Carry a notebook and pen. Take notes — document what's new or exciting. Write a short story about what you are learning. Challenge yourself to learn new things. Eat good food for brain fuel: fruits, veggies, nuts, fish. Exercise to generate increased endorphins help cognition and a feeling of well-being. Order your environment (desk, pantry, closets). Read about new ideas before you go to bed. Focus, focus, focus on what you want to learn. Have a regular and disciplined routine. Devote time and energy to learning. Be resilient - it's the root of success in life. Do more than you are required to do. Read an encyclopedia version of what you want to learn then ask yourself how I could teach this to an elementary school student? Let's embrace 2020 at the year to teach ourselves something new.
    Things We Mention In This Episode:
     
    Download a copy of my Cookbook Writing Roadmap  
    Please join our Confident Cookbook Writer Facebook Group Let’s connect on Instagram @greenapron

    • 22 min
    Episode 75: Being a Cookbook Writer: Habits of a Cooking or Baking

    Episode 75: Being a Cookbook Writer: Habits of a Cooking or Baking

    One of the foundational things I teach to students inside the Cookbook Writers Academy is the concept of Being a Cookbook Writer. What this means is that we have to think, feel, and act like a cookbook author even before we have a publishing contract.
    One part of "being a cookbook writer" (some who gets their cookbook published) is your willingness to learn new things. We talked about that in a previous issue of FPS. 
    Today, let's talk about habits, specifically our habits of cooking, writing and using our kitchens as a laboratory for our projects. Your daily habits as a cook, baker, and writer drive your cookbook project. If you don't cook, bake, or write, you project stalls. If you cook, bake, and write your project moves forward. It's time to think about your habits and how they affect your project. 
    Here's the best news: We can build or create new habits as cooks, bakers, and writers. We can decide to create recipes and write content for our cookbook projects. Or we don't. The choice is up to us.
    Part of my secret to success as a published cookbook author is that I use my kitchen-time as my laboratories where I  can develop cookbook concept ideas, recipes, and stories.  
    Evaluate Current Cooking or Baking Habits:  For the next week, write down everything you do in your kitchen. Describe what you consistently do every day in your kitchen. Make a pot of coffee, write it down. Make sandwiches for the kid's lunches, write it down. Scramble an egg. Make a smoothie. Fire up the Instant Pot. Write it all down.
    Decide to Create New Habits of Build On What You Already Do: After a week, be honest with yourself. If you want to write a cookbook, do your habits as a cook, support the work you'll need to do to cook and create recipes? If yes, great! If no, there's room for creating some habits. 
    Set Up a Cooking Notebook:  I record everything in a notebook. For 2020 I started a new notebook. 
    Evaluate What You Have: The first thing I do in a new notebook is to write down everything I have in my pantry or freezer that I want to use as a main course for a meal — meat in the freezer, eggs or tofu in the refrigerator, pasta or beans in the pantry.  
    Pick a Consistent Day to Plan: I do this on Wednesday, but you can pick the day that works best for you.
    Plan Your Next Week: Plan your next week ahead of time. The purpose of this plan is to know what you will be cooking or baking on any given day when you head into your kitchen you know the menu and you have the ingredients on hand to cook or bake. The truth is if this is what we are asking our cookbook readers to do, so there's no better way to communicate your message to readers that to live what you want to teach before you write it.
    Check the Calendar:  Next, I look at the calendar and the week ahead. What is going on in the evenings? Do we have to work late, teach a class, attend a basketball game or outside meeting? Evening activities affect what I cook, so I always consider that. 
    Plan an Entree to Cook Each Day: Next, I write down what we are going to eat each day. Every week I plan one meal that uses meat (chicken, beef, poultry, or lamb), one fish/seafood, one legume/bean, one pasta, one soup/stew, one pizza, and one new recipe.  Then referring to the list of ingredients I have on hand, I plug in any main entree items on hand and then fill the plan with ideas for the other days. 
    Make a Grocery List: While I'm planning, I also make my grocery list on this day. (I have a grocery list I typed up and it's available at www. Essentialpantry.net. if you're interested.) Each week we buy fresh fish or seafood, make a new kind of pizza, and enjoy an original recipe, so I know that I need to buy ingredients for those meals. I use up with I have on hand for the meat, bean, pasta, soup/stew meals and add to the grocery list additional fresh ingredients that are need

    • 25 min
    Episode 74: Cookbook Writing Appreciation

    Episode 74: Cookbook Writing Appreciation

    Welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about my life as a cookbook writer and how much I appreciate what being a cookbook writer has done for my life. I’ve traveled to new places, met amazing cooks and bakers, sat at the table with other amazing authors, and had the opportunity to speak about writing cookbooks. I’ve been able to be creative, help others feel better, and have more fun and success in the kitchen. This is also so much what I want for you and for my cookbook writing students.
     
    The secret to an ability to generate ideas and create the words for recipes and cookbooks, I believe flows from a  state of appreciation and love for our lives just as they are. It’s like appreciation for our lives, our circumstances, and our opportunity to even write a book is the switch to the fun, energetic, and sparkly part of our brains. 
     
    And when we are operating from a state of non-appreciation (or what I also like to call lack-i-tude) there is never enough. Never enough time, ideas, energy, money, or assistance for us to reach our cookbook writing goals. We find ourselves strive, search, and chase, and we never catch up. Lack-i-tude has us in a hole and we’re trying to see to the top of the hole and catch a glimpse of the light. 
     
    So today, I thought it would be fun to focus on the appreciation of cookbook writing and being a cookbook writer. My message to all of my students is that they don’t need to be published, or have a publishing contract to be a cookbook writer. They can decide to commit to dream of writing a cookbook, and become the writer that a publisher loves to work with.
     
    So, let’s think about how we immerse ourselves in Cookbook Writing Appreciation (like a view from the top of a mountain) vs Cookbook Writing Lack-i-tude (with a view from deep in a hole).
     
    Appreciation for the gift of life and that we are here to be able to write a cookbook.
    Appreciation for the capability and a brain to make decisions.
    Appreciation for the education to learn about recipes, cookbooks, writing, publisher, and agents.
    Appreciation for our individual food cultures.
    Appreciation for the possibility that we can become cookbook authors.
    Appreciation for the cookbook publishers who create beautiful books.
    Appreciation for the family and friends who have supported us along the way.
    Appreciation for the people engaged with what we create in the kitchen or on our blogs.
    Appreciation for the opportunity to create a tangible book.
    Appreciation for creativity, and access to the sparkly part of our brains.
    Appreciation for our basic human needs being met.
    Appreciation for the ability to invest in what we deem valuable.
    Appreciation to decide if we want to move forward with a cookbook project or not.
    Appreciation for the capacity to love others and let the energy of our love flow to others through food, cooking, baking, and cookbook.
    Appreciation for the ability to appreciate and see when we are living in cookbook writing appreciation or the land of lack-i-tude.
     
    Listen To This Episode:
     
    Apple Podcast App
    Stitcher
    Google Music Play
    Spotify

    Things We Mention In This Episode:
    Apply for March 2020 Hungry For a Cookbook Mastermind  
    Download a copy of my Cookbook Writing Roadmap  
    The Hot Sheet by Jane Friedman and Porter Anderson

    Please join our Confident Cookbook Writer Facebook Group

    Let’s connect on Instagram @greenapron

    • 18 min
    Episode 73: Interview with Author and Cooking Expert Peter Hertzmann

    Episode 73: Interview with Author and Cooking Expert Peter Hertzmann

    Hi and welcome back to another episode of the Cookbook Love Podcast. Today I feature an interview with author and cookbook collector and self-proclaimed autodidactic polymath, Peter Hertzmann. Peter has been the creator, author, and illustrator of the e-zine à la carte since its inception in 1999.  He is also the author of 50 Ways to Cook a Carrot and Knife Skills Illustrated. Peter is passionate about teaching people from all walks of life the skills that will enable them to cook almost anything. His obsession and life-long interest in cooking and culinary traditions goes back to the early 1970s and for him, cooking is not just a matter of preparing recipes, it is a total immersion in all things food. As he writes in his e-zine: “I’m obsessive. All my life, when something interested me, I became obsessed with it. I learned all I could about it. I lived it! 
    For most of his adult life, my interest was Chinese cookery—its preparation, materials, history, politics, and culture. Besides learning all he could about Chinese food and culture, he became involved with Chinese-American organizations and studied Chinese-American food, history, and culture. He collected English-language Chinese cookbooks and eventually amassed one of the largest collections in the world. (The books are now part of the Pond-Hertzmann Collection at the University of California at Davis.)
    Then one fall, during an eight-day trip to Paris—his first—he had an epiphany - that he wouldn’t be able to proceed with my education unless he spent a lot of time in France and learned to at least read some French. In the following two years, he started doing just that. As he was obsessed with Chinese cookery, he is now obsessive with French cookery—its preparation, materials, history, politics, and culture. His e-zine a la carte is part of that obsession.
    Listen To This Episode:
    Apple Podcast App
    Stitcher
    Google Music Play
    Spotify

    Things We Mention In This Episode:
    Peter’s website Hertzmann.com Bibliothèque Nationale de France Archive.org Google Books
     
    Download a copy of my Cookbook Writing Roadmap  
    Please join our Confident Cookbook Writer Facebook Group Let’s connect on Instagram @greenapron

    • 54 min
    Episode 72: 10 Questions To Gauge Your Perseverance in Cookbook Writing

    Episode 72: 10 Questions To Gauge Your Perseverance in Cookbook Writing

    Welcome to this episode today as we talk about perseverance as cooks, bakers, writers, and podcasters. 
     
    We live in a world where we want everything quick. Better yet, how about immediate, fast, and tomorrow is too late. In an instant-ramen-noodle-style life, we don’t want to wait, work hard, or feel challenged. We just want results.
    The truth is that most book projects are more like making a batch of chicken stock than they are like instant ramen noodles. Stock can’t be rushed if we want excellent results. To make the best stock we have to be willing to let the ingredients simmer and allow the heat to extract the flavor and gelatin from the bones. The results are worth the time and effort of preparing stock the correct way.
    Perseverance is defined as steadfastness in doing something despite delay or difficulty in achieving success. Making the commitment to anything new provides fuel to get you started. When you sign a publishing contract, you commit to completing a manuscript. When you launch an online program, you see it through in spite of any difficulties you may encounter. Ask anyone who is in the middle of a book-writing project, or launching a new program, and they will tell you that determination and persistence, aka perseverance, drives them toward the finish line.
    You aren’t going to find anybody that’s going to be successful without making a sacrifice and without perseverance. – Lou Holtz
    While researching material for this podcast I created a set of questions based on qualities that are present in individuals who persevere. With those in mind, and using my experiences with book and work projects (and marriage and raising children!), I added more qualities that I’ve found to be helpful for perseverance. So get a piece of paper and a pen and here are the questions you can ask yourself!

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

Jay is in the Kitchen ,

Outstanding

I
This is exactly what I have been looking for
I have listened to 4 and am thrilled I am coming late to the game because I can listen everyday until I get caught up
Maggie’s format, experience and conversation speak to me on so many levels
I am a cookbook collector and belong to a Physical Cookbook Club with 7 other women
I am looking to start a website, blog, newsletter. One day I hope a podcast and cookbook will be in my future
This podcast is not only motivating but gives me hope that cookbooks are not going anywhere
On a lighter side when Maggie spoke about journals, pens and writing I was sold.
So I have signed up for anything she is the connected with
Jay Evans

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