499 episodes

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

Dig Me Out - The 90s rock podcas‪t‬ Dig Me Out

    • Music Commentary
    • 4.6 • 7 Ratings

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

    #528: Tokyo An*l Dynamite by The Gerogerigegege

    #528: Tokyo An*l Dynamite by The Gerogerigegege

    Count to four. Do it seventy-five times, only interrupted by blistering feedback, screaming, and manic drums. And do it in about thirty-one minutes. That is Tokyo An*l Dynamite by The Gerogerigegege. In the world of experimental and avante-garde, noise has been tackled by artists as big as Neil Young and Lou Reed. Sonic Youth made a career out of crafting feedback into a symphony of melody. But if punk is about stripping rock 'n roll down to components and putting in the hands of the most rudimentary players, Tokyo Anal Dynamite might be the most punk rock album ever made.
     
    Songs In This Episode:
    Intro - Rock 'n Roll
    Outro - Atama
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.
     

    • 48 min
    #527: Cats and Dogs by Royal Trux

    #527: Cats and Dogs by Royal Trux

    Despite what the million-dollar deal with Virgin Records might have implied, Royal Trux we're never going to be hitmakers. The label bought their cool factor based largely on the 1993 album Cats and Dogs, their first to embrace the songwriting end of their lo-fi aesthetic that danced on the edges of 90s rock via critical praise and underground hype. Part droning Velvet Underground, part deconstructed Exile On Main Street-era Rolling Stones, with touches of Sonic Youth and Pavement, Royal Trux concocted a stew of brittle, off-kilter blues without a hint of irony. The result is occasionally blistering, but not without fragile moments that sound like collapse is imminent.
     
    Songs In This Episode:
    Intro - The Flag
    15:48 - Let's Get Lost
    18:38 - Up the Sleeve
    25:42 - Turn of the Century
    37:22 - Driving in That Car (with the Eagle on the Hood)
    Outro - The Spectre
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 58 min
    #526: Neil Young In The 90s

    #526: Neil Young In The 90s

    Neil Young has always been one to buck convention and follow his own muse, but the 80s saw him fall out of favor with mainstream audiences as he explored rockabilly, synthesizers, hard rock, traditional country, etc. with half-baked results. By the end of the decade, he was back on solid footing with Freedom, setting up Young's renaissance in the 90s. 1990's Ragged Glory paired him again with Crazy Horse, marking the start of a decade that found him touring with a variety of taste-making young acts, like Sonic Youth, Soundgarden, and Pearl Jam, who backed him on the generational crossover album Mirror Ball. Unlike many well-known acts from the 70s and 80s that continued in the 90s, Young might have been the most fully immersed in what was actually happening in 90s rock and pop culture.
     
    Song In This Episode:
    Intro - Downtown from Mirror Ball
    17:47 - Love To Burn from Ragged Glory
    22:25 - Harvest Moon from Harvest Moon
    37:56 - Peace And Love from Mirror Ball
    49:31 - Big Time from Broken Arrow
    Outro - Arc
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr 12 min
    #525: Clutch by Clutch

    #525: Clutch by Clutch

    While stoner and desert rock has been associated primarily with California bands like Kyuss, Fu Manchu, and Sleep, in reality artists across the country were putting their own spin on Black Sabbath's tracks like "Sweet Leaf" for decades. Bands like Monster Magnet in New Jersey, Corrosion of Conformity in North Carolina, and Clutch in Maryland have each contributed to 90s rock and beyond. On Clutch's sophomore self-titled album from 1995, the band tone down their freshman punk and louder tendencies, dialing back the distortion and locking into 70s psychedelic head-nodding grooves paired with the occasional frantic jammy freak out. The dividing line for listeners is vocalist Neil Fallon, who possesses one of the most otherworldly heavy voices that can bellow with the best, but is unafraid to explore funkier, sing-songy melodies that may not be for everyone.
     
    Songs In This Episode:
    Intro - Big News II
    15:31 - Rock N Roll Outlaw
    23:42 - Spacegrass
    30:40 - Droid
    Outro - Seven Jam
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 53 min
    #524: Rid Of Me by PJ Harvey

    #524: Rid Of Me by PJ Harvey

    With three decades of records to look back on, it's safe to say Polly Jean Harvey doesn't stand still for long. From the minimalist blues of To Bring You My Love to the eerie piano pieces of White Chalk, Harvey has become indie rock's David Bowie, evolving her style steadily and consistently, often at odds with expectations. On her second album as PJ Harvey, Rid Of Me stands the test of time thanks to her raw and intimate approach while unleashing Pixies-ish punk and Bo Diddley blues rhythms. Harvey plays in a big sandbox, and her handpicked producer Steve Albini is game, giving plenty of space for light and dark to crash and thrash.
     
    Songs In This Episode:
    Intro - 50ft Queenie
    16:19 - Rid Of Me
    27:03 - Dry
    32:52 - Me-Jane
    44:03 - Yuri-G
    Outro - Missed
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 57 min
    #523: Frizzle Fry by Primus

    #523: Frizzle Fry by Primus

    While much is made of genres like punk breaking through and topping the mainstream of 90s rock, the late 80s success of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Living Colour and Faith No More just as successfully pushed underground/alternative funk metal onto MTV. In 1990, Primus unleashed their twist on the sound with the progressive rock-influenced debut Frizzle Fry. Within a few years, thanks to catchier and catchier tunes paired with creative videos, the band would graduate from Headbanger's Ball to 120 Minutes to daytime rotation, solidifying them as a definitive band of the decade. But what to make of their first studio release, which finds Les Claypool's unendingly inventive approach to bass paired with equally stellar musicians in drummer Tim "Herb" Alexander and guitarist Larry LaLonde. If progressive rock, funk metal, or Claypool's distinct vocal and melodic approach aren't to your taste, is there still something worth checking out?
     
    Songs In This Episode:
    Intro - John the Fisherman
    18:18 - Too Many Puppies
    28:50 - The Toys Go Winding Down
    47:45: Harold of the Rocks
    Outro - To Defy the Laws of Tradition
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

leafsfan1980 ,

Awesome podcast

Excellent podcast, a unique perspective on the 90’s alt rock scene. The hosts are knowledgeable and very amicable, do your self a favour and check it out.

Dsven ,

Great in-depth discussion of 90s rock music

Really enjoy the work you guys do...always insightful and a pleasure to listen to.

Update for 2019: Still listening almost 5 years strong!

Kent F. ,

The Goods.

If you're of a certain age, and like me, could talk about music until you're blue in the face, I encourage you to check out this podcast, it's awesome. The most recent installment, featuring a lengthy interview with one of my favourite artists, Matthew Sweet, is fantastic.

In the back of my mind for years I always wanted to have a radio show on public or indie radio where I just talked about what I dug with a co-host/guests, but I'm too lazy to do the legwork.

This is that show. I wish I could be on with Tim and Jason the hosts. We are brothers from another mother.

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