11 episodes

Disasters from History is a narrative podcast which tells the fascinating stories of historical events that have gone horribly wrong. Listen along as I share the lesser-known stories behind the most catastrophic events in history and discuss their historical impacts. The stories you will hear range from heart-wrenching tales of great tradgedies, to stories of seemingly harmless events that ended disastrously. Whether you consider yourself a history buff or not, I urge you to lend me your ears for this informative, intriguing, and engaging podcast.

Disasters from History Justin Ordway

    • Society & Culture

Disasters from History is a narrative podcast which tells the fascinating stories of historical events that have gone horribly wrong. Listen along as I share the lesser-known stories behind the most catastrophic events in history and discuss their historical impacts. The stories you will hear range from heart-wrenching tales of great tradgedies, to stories of seemingly harmless events that ended disastrously. Whether you consider yourself a history buff or not, I urge you to lend me your ears for this informative, intriguing, and engaging podcast.

    A Killer Crowd

    A Killer Crowd

    Whether waiting outside a concert venue, a shopping mall, attending a rally, or even just waiting for a subway train, crowds are all around us. They're an everyday part of life for many of us, especially for those who live in cities or other population-dense areas. Though we all know the joys and pangs of being a part of one, many of us forget, or are straight-up unaware, of the inherent dangers that are present in large, high-density masses of people. Thankfully, various protocols and developing technologies have helped manage large crowds to make them safer, but these modern day advances are all a direct result of events which unfolded outside a concert venue on a cold December night in 1979.
    NOTE: I apologize for the clipping audio which is present in most episodes of this podcast. These clips are caused by my fairly old computer which I record on, and its inability to process audio seamlessly. Trust me, I find the issues very annoying myself and I am working to correct them in future episodes. Thank you for your understanding.

    • 15 min
    The Speed Queen of the Great Lakes

    The Speed Queen of the Great Lakes

    Of all the various forms which a disaster can take, maritime, or sea-related disasters, are among the most common. Generally, disasters at sea happen, well, at sea – or at least in the middle of a body of water far away from land, and a long way’s away from rescue. As we will learn in this episode, this is not true for all maritime disasters. Sometimes disaster can strike in the unlikeliest of places. Sometimes, even, just a stone’s throw away.

    • 16 min
    A Modest Proposal

    A Modest Proposal

    Today, April 15, 2017, marks the 105th anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic.
     
    Music used:
    Music For Funeral Home - Part 11 by: Kevin Macleod
    Courtesy of incompetech.com

    • 7 min
    The Band Plays On

    The Band Plays On

    It is commonly believed that the final song played aboard Titanic, as she began her final plunge to the bottom, was "Nearer My God To Thee". The idea of this being Titanic's final song is poetic and fitting. However, Harold Bride, Titanic's surviving wireless telegraph operator, was among the last people aboard the ship as she disappeared beneath the surface, and when asked what song he heard the bandsmen play last, he replied "Autumn". Bride's testimony was considered credible, and for years it was believed that the hymn was the last score heard by Titanic's victims. Walter Lord, a Titanic historian and author, pointed out that hymns are not known by their musical qualities, but rather by the first line of their lyrics. With this revelation, it has been determined to be very likely that Bride was actually referring to the Waltz "Songe d'Automne" (French for "dream of autumn"), which was a popular song at the time and was often requested to be played aboard ships. And so, with the knowledge we do have of the Titanic disaster, it is most likely that Songe d'Automne was the final song played aboard Titanic.
     
    In this episode, you'll hear the story of the heroism that Titanic's eight bandsmen displayed during the final hour before the world's greatest ship would disappear forever beneath the waves.
     
    Music used: Songe d'Automne - Ian Whitcomb
    (Slowed 7.2%) 
    If you enjoyed this music please support the artist!

    • 9 min
    "Iceberg, dead ahead!"

    "Iceberg, dead ahead!"

    On the night of April 14, 1912 just moments before 11:40 PM eastern standard time, Titanic crow's nest lookout Frederick Fleet spots what appears to be an iceberg lying stationary in the ship's path. He signals to the ship's bridge to warn them of the berg, but ultimately his efforts are in vain. The massive ship cannot change its course in time, and she strikes the berg along her starboard side ripping a 300-foot long gash in her hull. This is the story telling of what those onboard experienced as the vessel they occupied was mortally-wounded, setting the stage for the greatest maritime disaster in recorded history.


    Music used: End of the Era Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
    (Slowed 10%)

    • 11 min
    A Quick Announcement (and a special treat!)

    A Quick Announcement (and a special treat!)

    In this mini-episode, I make an announcement and a special treat follows. I hope you enjoy.


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    Music used: Dark Times Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

    • 4 min

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