300 episodes

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Checks and balance: Suburban brawl

    Checks and balance: Suburban brawl

    Donald Trump hopes fear of unrest and rising crime will appeal to the “suburban housewives” he tweets about. It’s a strategy borrowed from Richard Nixon, who first harnessed the political power of suburban voters to win the White House. But two years ago the Democrats took control of Congress by winning suburbia. Who will win the suburban vote this time?


    We speak to election forecaster Rachel Bitecofer, Candace Valenzuela, who is running for Congress in the Texas suburbs, and look back to the battles over segregation that shaped the politics of suburbia.
     
    John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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    • 33 min
    Uneasy lies the head: Thailand’s under-fire king

    Uneasy lies the head: Thailand’s under-fire king

    Thailand is bracing for a large anti-government protest, with some of the anger directed at the usually-revered monarchy. Some fear that the establishment’s patience will snap, with bloody results. Freemasonry has been one of the most contagious ideas of the modern age, spreading to every corner of the world. But the number of masons is shrinking. And in Britain, social distancing may have shut nightclubs. But many ravers don’t tech-no for an answer. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 23 min
    The Economist Asks: David Cameron

    The Economist Asks: David Cameron

    A former British prime minister is optimistic there will be a post-Brexit trade deal. Anne McElvoy asks him if ill-tempered trade negotiations have damaged Britain's global reputation—and what he really makes of Boris Johnson. Also, what could he have done differently when intervening in Afghanistan and did he, as alleged, run a "government of chums"?


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    • 40 min
    Conviction politics: Florida’s disenfranchised felons

    Conviction politics: Florida’s disenfranchised felons

    More than a million former felons in Florida regained the right to vote in 2018. Last week, many of them lost it again. We look at the barriers to voting in America. Colombia’s militarised police force are khaki-klad, poorly paid and heavy-handed. A case of police brutality has now provoked big protests and calls for reform. And in the Netherlands, covid-carrying Minks have been spared the slaughterhouse. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 22 min
    Babbage: Rosalind Franklin

    Babbage: Rosalind Franklin

    100 years after the British scientist Rosalind Franklin's birth, The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder explores her scientific achievements—from photographing the double helix of DNA to discovering the first three-dimensional structure of a virus. And, how does Franklin’s work help the study of covid-19?


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    • 27 min
    Sanctuary in Sochi: Belarus’ dictator clings on

    Sanctuary in Sochi: Belarus’ dictator clings on

    Belarus dictator, Alexander Lukashenko, has travelled to Sochi amid major protests at home to ask Vladimir Putin for help. We examine whether he will get it—and what the price might be. The possible discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus could be a tantalising hint of life beyond Earth. And K-Pop, marred by sexual abuse scandals, is shedding its misogynistic image. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

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532 Ratings

532 Ratings

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I’m from Canada and I love the difficult pointed questions that the interviewers make. I hear it’s a trademark of your culture (the infamous Ben Shapiro interview comes to mind). I also love how they are done in a friendly good spirited way. Thanks for showing me that civil discourse does exist !

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