300 episodes

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Checks and Balance: The art of losing

    Checks and Balance: The art of losing

    The Economist's election forecast shows Joe Biden heading for a landslide victory. But August is not November. President Trump has recently shifted focus back to the coronavirus in an attempt to rescue his reelection bid and Republicans have outpaced Democrats in swing-state voter registration. How can fortunes change during a campaign? We ask Stuart Stevens, chief strategist of several Republican campaigns, author and political consultant, and Matt Bennett, Democratic presidential adviser and executive vice-president at Third Way a centrist think-tank.


    Host John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, with Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent, and Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief. 


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    • 45 min
    That history should not repeat: Hiroshima’s storytellers

    That history should not repeat: Hiroshima’s storytellers

    Survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings are now in their eighties. A new generation is learning to tell their tales, in hopes of preventing more atomic tragedies. Belarus’s president of 26 years will probably win in Sunday’s election, but an invigorated—and unexpected—opposition has him on the back foot. And the horror movie that will make you nervous to use Zoom. 
    Additional archive courtesy of Soka Gakkai Women’s Peace Committee. Additional sounds by InspectorJ at Freesound.org. 
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    • 22 min
    The Economist Asks: Darren Walker

    The Economist Asks: Darren Walker

    The coronavirus pandemic has widened inequality in America but has also supercharged charitable giving. Host Anne McElvoy asks Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, whether philanthropy can help save the American Dream. Will companies that proclaim the new era of "stakeholder capitalism" actually sideline their shareholders? And as the number of empty plinths grows, which forgotten heroes deserve to fill them? 


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    • 26 min
    A broken system, a broken city: Beirut

    A broken system, a broken city: Beirut

    Some 300,000 people are homeless after an explosion of unthinkable size. The culprit appears to be sheer negligence, brought on by a broken system of governance. The Economist’s data team has updated its excess-death tracker, giving ever-better insight into just how deadly covid-19 is. And the tricky trade-offs for both bosses and workers as they return to the office. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 22 min
    Babbage: Put to the test

    Babbage: Put to the test

    A shortage of covid-19 tests around the world has hampered efforts to contain it. Could "pool sampling" be a solution? Also, the promise of million-mile electric car batteries? And, Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, a developmental biologist at the University of Cambridge and Caltech, on the mysteries of life after conception. Kenneth Cukier hosts 
     
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    • 25 min
    One nation, under gods? India’s divisive temple

    One nation, under gods? India’s divisive temple

    Consecration at Ayodhya, the country’s most contested holy site, is another tick box in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu-nationalist agenda. Is India’s foundational secularism at risk? The pandemic has been particularly cruel for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s; we examine new research that gives them a ray of hope. And the massive, wheel-terms growth in e-bike sales. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
505 Ratings

505 Ratings

Yhs9988 ,

Great source of info on the go

This is what keeps me updated about what’s going on around the world. I find it less bias than any other news source I’ve encountered previously. Thumbs up.

irarraza ,

Editors pick July 27,2020

Content interesting but awful to listen a robotic like voice if not a robotic.
I would never accept robotic news. If not delivered by a real human...then good bye.

T. Penna ,

To Doug the dog

Left wing? It was fully balanced, apart from the gentleman (no doubt a Republican) who likened voting to Walmart. Face it, the modus opera di of WI's Republican Party is to impede voter turnout. This is, as one of the show hosts stated, shameful.

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