300 episodes

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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    • 4.4, 472 Ratings

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Babbage: The language of the universe

    Babbage: The language of the universe

    How can mathematics help us understand our lives and predict the world around us? Host Alok Jha speaks to David Sumpter of Uppsala University about the equations that can help people make better decisions. Christl Donnelly, an epidemiologist at the University of Oxford and Imperial College London details the role mathematics plays in modelling covid-19. Moon Duchin of Tufts University explains how maths can stop gerrymandering. And physicist Graham Farmelo on why he thinks the universe speaks in numbers. 


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    • 25 min
    Leading nowhere: assessing Trump’s covid-19 response

    Leading nowhere: assessing Trump’s covid-19 response

    President Donald Trump’s failures of leadership have compounded the crisis. But America’s health-care and preparedness systems have problems that predate him. South Korea marks the 40th anniversary of a massacre that remains politically divisive even now. And, today’s space-launch plan in America blazes a trail for a new, commercial space industry. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer
     
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    • 22 min
    Money Talks: We’re not going on a summer holiday

    Money Talks: We’re not going on a summer holiday

    Travel has virtually ground to a halt during the pandemic, exacerbating the global economy’s woes—by complicating trade ties, upending business and devastating the tourist trade. Host Simon Long explores the future of the travel industry, staycations in South Korea and future consolidation in the airline industry. Also, could travel bubbles offer a route to economic recovery?  
     
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    • 21 min
    Shot chasers: big pharma’s covid-19 boost

    Shot chasers: big pharma’s covid-19 boost

    The pandemic has caused a shift in how drug firms are viewed: their capacity for big-money innovation will give them immunity in the crisis. Widespread homeworking will have broad consequences, from commercial-property values to urban demographics. And a seemingly innocuous Hong Kong history exam is a window into the territory’s increasingly fraught politics. 
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    • 20 min
    The World Ahead: After Kim Jong-un

    The World Ahead: After Kim Jong-un

    The North Korean leader’s recent disappearance for three weeks led to intense speculation about his health. What would happen if Mr Kim's regime collapsed? Peter Singer, an author and political scientist, explains how his novel, set in the near future, is helping policymakers respond to artificial intelligence. And how feasible is wireless charging for electric cars? Tom Standage hosts
     
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    • 25 min
    Clear skies with a chance: covid-19’s green opportunity

    Clear skies with a chance: covid-19’s green opportunity

    Emissions have plummeted as the pandemic slowed the world. It could be a mere blip—but it is an unprecedented opportunity for a greener, more sustainable economy. Serving in America’s armed forces is a long-established path to citizenship, but that path is narrowing. And we ask how sport will emerge from the pandemic, even if the stands stay empty. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer
     
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    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
472 Ratings

472 Ratings

T. Penna ,

To Doug the dog

Left wing? It was fully balanced, apart from the gentleman (no doubt a Republican) who likened voting to Walmart. Face it, the modus opera di of WI's Republican Party is to impede voter turnout. This is, as one of the show hosts stated, shameful.

dougthedog22 ,

Unbalanced political view point

A well put together program but it’s appears to tell it’s story from a left wing point of view.

Cytoproct ,

A welcome commuters’ companion

One cannot help but be stimulated by the tech news, the political coverage, and the business stories featured on the Economist. The presenters are erudite and punchy and the stories engaging albeit brief.

Earlier problems with the audio (base volume fluctuated greatly between episodes) seem to have largely been corrected. I very much look forward to Palmer and Cukier among others and of course, the peerless McElvoy.

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