1,911 episodes

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Checks and Balance: Sequel opportunities

    Checks and Balance: Sequel opportunities

    Donald Trump has emerged from purdah at a meeting of conservative activists, hinting at another presidential run. Even in defeat the former President retains control of a party united in antipathy to liberal elites. Where does cleaving to culture leave Republicans?


    We look at the legacy of Rush Limbaugh, who pioneered Trump’s brand of anti-elitism, and speak to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, one of America’s most popular Republicans.


    John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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    • 39 min
    Rubber-stamping ground: China’s parliament meets

    Rubber-stamping ground: China’s parliament meets

    The National People’s Congress kicked off with two big signals of Beijing’s intentions: a return to economic-growth targets and a plan to eradicate Hong Kong’s vestiges of democracy. On the first-ever papal visit to Iraq, Pope Francis hopes to give succour to the country’s beleaguered Christians. And the continued tribulations of the nightclub scene.
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    • 21 min
    The Economist Asks: Sir Kazuo Ishiguro

    The Economist Asks: Sir Kazuo Ishiguro

    What can artificial intelligence reveal about what it means to be human? Host Anne McElvoy asks the Nobel prize-winning author of "The Remains of the Day” about his new book, "Klara and the Sun", in which he argues that people's relationship to machines will eventually change the way they think of themselves as individuals. But does he think only humans are capable of love? And what do he and his author daughter argue about?
     
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    • 31 min
    Exit stages left: America and the Middle East

    Exit stages left: America and the Middle East

    The Biden administration would like to pull back from the region; America’s strategic interests have changed, as have regional dynamics. We examine the careful exit that is possible. To evade censors China’s cinephiles often turn to pirated versions of foreign films, but the volunteers who subtitle them are under increasing pressure. And researchers make a connection with the dream world. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 21 min
    Babbage: Variations on a gene

    Babbage: Variations on a gene

    As global vaccination efforts continue, how is the coronavirus mutating to stay ahead? The head of Britain's covid-19 genomics consortium explains why genetic sequencing is crucial. Also, how studying individual cancer genes may improve precision treatments. And an AI for an eye—host Kenneth Cukier investigates the potential of AI in medicine first hand.




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    • 24 min
    Owing to the pandemic: Britain’s budget

    Owing to the pandemic: Britain’s budget

    The finance minister has a plan that will keep many safeguards in place—for now. We ask how the country will then dig itself out of a financial hole. As countries aim for net-zero emissions, how to pick the policies that do the most good for the least cash? And why every fruit tree in Zanzibar has an owner. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
620 Ratings

620 Ratings

Valyrian Steel Metal ,

Interviewing Style

I’m from Canada and I love the difficult pointed questions that the interviewers make. I hear it’s a trademark of your culture (the infamous Ben Shapiro interview comes to mind). I also love how they are done in a friendly good spirited way. Thanks for showing me that civil discourse does exist !

gerardootero ,

My preferred podcast

The Economist Asks interviews a wide variety of thinkers, doers and policy makers. Ann Mc. is a fantastic interviewer and has the most pleasant female voice I’ve heard. Highly recommended.

Canucks 1234567890 ,

Well researched, enjoyable to listen to

The economist is by far one of the best all around news and information podcasts I have ever come across. The hosts are great and I keep finding myself coming back to this podcast.

Recommending it to my friends and they agree, perfect way to start your day.

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