10 min

Episode 148 - LinkedIn Opportunities for Your Business Executive Protection and Secure Transportation Podcast

    • Business News

The topic of today’s episode is LinkedIn Opportunities for Your Business.
With over half a billion users, LinkedIn is the biggest opportunity to connect with not only your peers but potential employers and selling/marketing your products and services.
The Setup – What’s in a Name The first order of business is to complete your profile as it offers several key branding and searchable elements.
There is the availability to add an image at the top of your profile.   Add one that depicts you as an individual or your business.
Profile image. So many profiles I’ve come across just have the ghost image. Avoid that if you can, granted OPSEC can be a legitimate concern, but by adding a face you literally are adding a face to your name and business. The image should represent who you are. Some suggest professional suit and tie, but if that isn’t you, the real you, why pretend?
 
I do recommend adding your real name as it adds authenticity to your brand. Again OPSEC comes in to play understandably, but even if you could do the first name, last name initial is better than a fictitious name like Hugh Erection (yes that is an actual name someone is using on LinkedIn, and incidentally, on Facebook).
The Headline section is very important, don’t skip this part. The headline is a good opportunity to introduce yourself – who you are and what do you do. The Headline also helps with you being found in LinkedIn search. For example, adding in social media consultant, protective services professional in the Headline will help your profile being found in the search results when a person searches for those keyword phrases.
 
Another area in LinkedIn profiles that I’ve seen lacking information is the Contact Information. You can add phone numbers, email, and links to websites and other social media accounts. You can customize the links so that it’s memorable and brand-specific.
Other information to add to your profile – summary, work history, schools, training, recommendations, and skills.  Don’t misinform or embellish.
Run the option play An option, not a requirement, but one that I recommend, is to upgrade to LinkedIn Premium. Premium unlocks certain services that you can take advantage of such as LinkedIn Learning, which is an online education hub. As well as access to job and salary data and other features like who is looking at your profile.
Making the Connection I would suggest that you be strategic – try not to get overwhelmed. Your focus should be on what companies may need your products and services. Follow the company, owners, founders, and employees.
Connecting with peers on LinkedIn is really a given, but still, be strategic about your choices on whom to connect with. Ask yourself – will this person provide me with value to help me or my business grow and vice versa; what or who is it that we have in common? Is this a future networking opportunity? In other words, don’t connect with everybody – keep in mind your goals for your business.
Finding Jobs, Comparative Analysis Finding jobs isn’t hard on LinkedIn – being qualified is the difficult part. Look at jobs you’re interested in – what are the requirements? How can you achieve those requirements? What training is necessary? From a service provider or products supplier look at these jobs as a way to determine what the company is lacking – compare your services to the company’s needs.
LinkedIn Job search is among the best whether you are looking for a job or looking for your target market by looking at the qualifications and requirements for a job.
For example, I searched for an executive protection specialist in the United States.
 
After clicking on the job position for Snap Inc. you can see more detail on the second page.  Look at the qualifications and requirements. Questions to ask yourself – is this job something my

The topic of today’s episode is LinkedIn Opportunities for Your Business.
With over half a billion users, LinkedIn is the biggest opportunity to connect with not only your peers but potential employers and selling/marketing your products and services.
The Setup – What’s in a Name The first order of business is to complete your profile as it offers several key branding and searchable elements.
There is the availability to add an image at the top of your profile.   Add one that depicts you as an individual or your business.
Profile image. So many profiles I’ve come across just have the ghost image. Avoid that if you can, granted OPSEC can be a legitimate concern, but by adding a face you literally are adding a face to your name and business. The image should represent who you are. Some suggest professional suit and tie, but if that isn’t you, the real you, why pretend?
 
I do recommend adding your real name as it adds authenticity to your brand. Again OPSEC comes in to play understandably, but even if you could do the first name, last name initial is better than a fictitious name like Hugh Erection (yes that is an actual name someone is using on LinkedIn, and incidentally, on Facebook).
The Headline section is very important, don’t skip this part. The headline is a good opportunity to introduce yourself – who you are and what do you do. The Headline also helps with you being found in LinkedIn search. For example, adding in social media consultant, protective services professional in the Headline will help your profile being found in the search results when a person searches for those keyword phrases.
 
Another area in LinkedIn profiles that I’ve seen lacking information is the Contact Information. You can add phone numbers, email, and links to websites and other social media accounts. You can customize the links so that it’s memorable and brand-specific.
Other information to add to your profile – summary, work history, schools, training, recommendations, and skills.  Don’t misinform or embellish.
Run the option play An option, not a requirement, but one that I recommend, is to upgrade to LinkedIn Premium. Premium unlocks certain services that you can take advantage of such as LinkedIn Learning, which is an online education hub. As well as access to job and salary data and other features like who is looking at your profile.
Making the Connection I would suggest that you be strategic – try not to get overwhelmed. Your focus should be on what companies may need your products and services. Follow the company, owners, founders, and employees.
Connecting with peers on LinkedIn is really a given, but still, be strategic about your choices on whom to connect with. Ask yourself – will this person provide me with value to help me or my business grow and vice versa; what or who is it that we have in common? Is this a future networking opportunity? In other words, don’t connect with everybody – keep in mind your goals for your business.
Finding Jobs, Comparative Analysis Finding jobs isn’t hard on LinkedIn – being qualified is the difficult part. Look at jobs you’re interested in – what are the requirements? How can you achieve those requirements? What training is necessary? From a service provider or products supplier look at these jobs as a way to determine what the company is lacking – compare your services to the company’s needs.
LinkedIn Job search is among the best whether you are looking for a job or looking for your target market by looking at the qualifications and requirements for a job.
For example, I searched for an executive protection specialist in the United States.
 
After clicking on the job position for Snap Inc. you can see more detail on the second page.  Look at the qualifications and requirements. Questions to ask yourself – is this job something my

10 min

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