16 episodes

The Five Good Ideas podcast rebroadcasts some of the best sessions of Maytree’s popular lunch-and-learn program.

For each session of Five Good Ideas, an expert from the non-profit or corporate sector shares five practical ideas on a key management issue facing non-profit organizations today.

You find sessions from the past season at https://maytree.com/five-good-ideas/.

Five Good Ideas Podcast Maytree Foundation

    • Management
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

The Five Good Ideas podcast rebroadcasts some of the best sessions of Maytree’s popular lunch-and-learn program.

For each session of Five Good Ideas, an expert from the non-profit or corporate sector shares five practical ideas on a key management issue facing non-profit organizations today.

You find sessions from the past season at https://maytree.com/five-good-ideas/.

    Five Good Ideas about fundraising in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic

    Five Good Ideas about fundraising in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic

    In this session, originally recorded on June 30, 2020, we asked Lindsay Groves and Susan Vardon to share five good Ideas about fundraising in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    In this period of uncertainty created by the Covid-19 pandemic, many non-profit organizations have revised budgets and modified revenue projections to reflect the new reality. While it’s essential that we exercise caution in our outlook, we must also seek every opportunity to set priorities and plans that strengthen our fundraising potential in 2020 and 2021. Lindsay Groves, Vice President, Global Partnerships, and Susan Vardon, Canadian National Director, both of Right To Play International, share ideas on how to re-think your case for giving, innovate your approaches to communications and stewardship to maintain relationships with government partners and individual and corporate donors, as well as recover revenue from lost special events.
    Five Good Ideas

    Evolve your case for giving
    Stay close to “family”
    Get creative with your grant portfolio
    Re-frame your special events
    Leverage technology to advance relationships

    Related resource:

    Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP): Coronavirus/ COVID-19 resource guide 
    Oxford Group: Insights
    Global Giving: Eight tips for compassionate fundraising during COVID-19
    Philanthropy Daily: How to recover revenue from canceled fundraising events
    KCI: COVID 19’s impact on Canadian fundraising

    For the full transcript, visit https://maytree.com/five-good-ideas/five-good-ideas-about-fundraising-in-the-time-of-the-covid-19-pandemic/
    About Lindsay Groves and Susan Vardon
    Lindsay Groves is the Vice President for Global Partnerships at Right To Play. Lindsay joined Right To Play’s Global Office in 2008. As the Vice-President for Global Partnerships, Lindsay builds impactful partnerships and programs that empower children to rise above the challenges they face. Lindsay has a Bachelor of Arts from Queens University, a post-graduate degree in International Project Management from Humber College and a Masters of Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto.
    Susan Vardon is the National Director at Right To Play Canada and has been in that role since September of 2019. She leads a team that fundraises from Canadians for both global programs and partnerships with Indigenous communities in Canada that support children through the power of play. Prior to joining Right To Play, Susan was the Director of Strategic Partnerships at Community Food Centres Canada (CFCC) for 3.5 years. Before CFCC, Susan spent over 20 years at United Way Greater Toronto in a variety of different roles. Susan has also worked as a fundraiser at Queen’s University, The Wellesley Hospital and Upper Canada College. Susan graduated with a Bachelor of Commerce from Queen’s University in 1988 and has a CFRE, Certified Fundraising Executive, des

    • 44 min
    Five good ideas about maintaining morale while managing a remote team

    Five good ideas about maintaining morale while managing a remote team

    In this session, originally recorded on May 6, 2020, Christine Yip shares her five good ideas about maintaining morale while managing a remote team.
    After a few months of working from home, most of us will have fallen into some type of routine. At the same time, removed from our daily in-person contacts, relying on regular video calls, watching too many news conferences hoping for an easing of the restrictions, many may also feel a renewed sense of anxiety. Some of you may start to feel “fed up” with being stuck inside, having a hard time getting motivated to get your day started, or keeping a good balance between being at your (home) work desk and getting a good rest away from your desk. And for those of us managing a team, now remotely, we have the additional task of making sure everyone is doing well and keeping mentally healthy.
    Five Good Ideas

    Be clear and realistic about expectations
    Be flexible and respect boundaries
    Communicate effectively
    Provide space to “recharge”
    Take time to take care of yourself

    Related resource:

    Working from Home: The Good, The Bad, and The Key to Success
    Access additional resources at orgsforimpact.com/resources

    For the full transcript, visit https://maytree.com/stories/five-good-ideas-about-maintaining-morale-while-managing-a-remote-team/
    About Christine Yip
    Christine Yip is the Founder of Organizations for Impact, a management consultancy that works with leaders across sectors to build more inclusive, psychologically safe, and empowering workplace cultures. Previous to this, Christine worked as a Manager at both Accenture and KPMG consulting practices, and as a social policy researcher at the University of Toronto’s Mowat Centre and the London School of Economics’ Centre for Analysis and Social Exclusion. She holds a Masters Degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics and a Masters in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from the University of Guelph. She also teaches Change Management at York’s Schulich School of Business.
     

    • 25 min
    Five good ideas about re-opening your workplace post COVID-19

    Five good ideas about re-opening your workplace post COVID-19

    In this session, originally recorded on May 26, 2020, Robyn Osgood and Dave McKechnie share their five good ideas about re-opening your workplace post COVID-19.
    Robyn Osgood, Managing Director, McMillan Vantage Policy Group, and Dave McKechnie, Chair, Employment & Labour Relations, McMillan LLP, discussed their five good ideas for organizations to implement as we think about re-opening our workplaces, including re-examining how we work and implementing lessons learned over the course of the COVID-19 crisis.
    Five Good Ideas

    It’s chaos, be kind (learn to embrace the chaos while sweating the big stuff)
    Level up: it’s (past) time to upgrade (and it’s not just about technology)
    Figure out what’s worked and hasn’t worked (and who it is that makes the determination)
    Know your team: what will it take for people to work in an office
    Hold up a mirror: do as you say

    Additional resources:

    Presentation slides (PDF)
    Returning to Work: Is Your Organization Ready? (PDF): A three-point Return-to-Work Health Check to help associations and not-for-profits navigate the new normal
    McMillan Lawcasts: Archive of webinars to help you and your team stay current on the latest legal developments (note: free registration required)
    Edited online chat transcript

    For the full transcript, visit https://maytree.com/stories/five-good-ideas-about-re-opening-your-workplace-post-covid-19/
    About Robyn Osgood and Dave McKechnie
    Robyn Osgood is a Managing Director at McMillan Vantage Policy Group. She has almost 30 years of experience providing strategic communications counsel and developing and implementing communications plans. She has worked extensively with the NGO sector over that time.
    Dave McKechnie is the Chair of Employment & Labour Relations, McMillan LLP. He practices in all areas of labour and employment law at both the provincial and federal level.
    The podcast is provided for general information purposes only. It is neither intended as, nor should be considered, legal advice and listeners are cautioned against making any decisions based on this material alone. Rather, a qualified lawyer should be consulted. © McMillan LLP 2020.

    • 52 min
    Five Good Ideas about building power for change

    Five Good Ideas about building power for change

    In this session, originally recorded on February 26, 2020, we look at how to build democratic power for change. Our speaker for this session is Michal Hay, the Founding Executive Director of Progress Toronto. As an organizer, her focus is on bridging the gap between people and the political power needed for progressive change.
    Our cities are becoming increasingly unaffordable and income inequality is widening faster than ever before. People, communities, and an entire generation are being squeezed out. The decisions made in the halls of power can either take us down a more progressive path or deepen the divide. Unfortunately, many decision-makers are removed from the day-to-day experiences of the people they represent. So how can we influence and shape the decisions being made? What power do we have to create meaningful change and transform our cities? In this Five Good Ideas session, Michal Hay shares her experiences on building power, winning, and making change. She offers five good ideas for building democratic power to win.
    Five Good Ideas
    1. The power we have is people
    2. Our power increases as our numbers increase, and for that to truly/deeply happen we need distributed leadership
    3. Invest in building power. That means training people and giving them the opportunity to apply the skills and lead
    4. Share your strategy, goals, and priorities with people to help train and motivate them
    5. Every campaign is an opportunity build power and ideally to build on what was built before
     Resources
    1. Movement School’s Campaign Fellows. This 10-week intensive campaign simulation cultivates leaders to run, and win, grassroots campaigns. Movement School is an initiative connected to Justice Democrats, a coalition working to elect more progressives in America. https://www.movementschool.us/campaignfellows
    2. Our Revolution. This organization was formed after Bernie Sanders first presidential campaign in 2016. Outside of the presidential election they have run issue-based campaigns and supported candidates in local and state election. https://www.ourrevolution.com/
    3. Barcelona en Comú. In 2015, Ada Colau became the mayor of Barcelona from a historic campaign that involved as many people. Her organizing and leadership is changing the city. https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/jun/22/barcelona-comun-guide-how-win-city-elite
    4. Make the Road New York. They focus on building the power of immigrant and working class communities to achieve dignity and justice. Check out their leadership development programs — and victories to be inspired. https://maketheroadny.org/
    5. Push Buffalo. A locally based organization that believes deeply in people power by mobilizing residents to create strong neighbourhoods with affordable housing through efforts like expanding local hiring opportunities, and advancing economic and environmental justice. https://www.pushbuffalo.org/mission/
    For the full transcript, visit https://maytree.com/five-good-ideas/five-good-ideas-about-building-power-for-change/
    About Michal Hay
    Michal Hay is the Founding Executive Director of Pro

    • 37 min
    Five Good Ideas about creating a psychologically safe workplace culture

    Five Good Ideas about creating a psychologically safe workplace culture

    In this session, originally recorded on January 28, 2020, we look at how individuals, managers, and organizations can create psychologically safe workplaces with Christine Yip.
    As work becomes busier, deadlines tighter, and pressure to do more with less becomes the rule rather than the exception, it is not surprising that the “self-care” movement has become more popular than ever. But as organizations continue to require their people to deliver more with less, “self-care” strategies can only go so far. In this Five Good Ideas session, Christine Yip, founder of Organizations for Impact, shares her own personal experience surviving and thriving in high pressure work environments, as well as practical strategies individuals, managers, and organizations can put into practice to “walk the talk” in creating psychologically safe workplaces.
    Five Good Ideas
    1. Start with compassion – for yourself and those you work with
    2. Communicate with courage
    3. Find the “Positive Deviants” and share learnings
    4. Role model and reward behaviours that promote trust, empathy, and support
    5. Set up accountability mechanisms to foster a culture of psychological safety
     Resources
    1. TedTalk Dan Cable: Best-Self Activation | Professor Dan Cable | TEDx London Business School
    2. National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (Mental Health Commission of Canada)
    3. Guarding Minds at Work Survey & Business Case Tools (Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction)
    4. Workplace Strategies for Mental Health by Canada Life
    5. Google Re:Work Toolkit for Psychological Safety
     For the full transcript, visit https://maytree.com/five-good-ideas/five-good-ideas-about-creating-a-psychologically-safe-workplace-culture/
    About Christine Yip
    Christine Yip is the Founder of Organizations for Impact, a management consultancy that works with leaders across sectors to build more inclusive, psychologically safe, and empowering workplace cultures. Previous to this, Christine worked as a Manager at both Accenture and KPMG consulting practices, and as a social policy researcher at the University of Toronto’s Mowat Centre and the London School of Economics’ Centre for Analysis and Social Exclusion. She holds a Masters Degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics and a Masters in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from the University of Guelph. She also teaches Change Management at York’s Schulich School of Business.

    • 33 min
    Five Good Ideas about staying on the right side of the CRA

    Five Good Ideas about staying on the right side of the CRA

    In this session, originally recorded on November 26, 2019, we look at how your non-profit can minimize the risk of a CRA audit, and be in a good position if and when that auditor gives your organization a call. Our guest speaker for this session is Susan Manwaring.
     
    For the full transcript and the ideas, visit https://maytree.com/five-good-ideas/five-good-ideas-about-staying-on-the-right-side-of-the-cra/
     
    Charities know about the tax regulations that govern their work and work hard to stay compliant. That said, as organizations are all faced with competing pressures for time and resources in their work, it is often tough to prioritize what gets done and figure out how to meet these requirements efficiently. But there are things your organization can do when operating and maintaining its books and records to ensure that the CRA gives you a good report card if an audit occurs. In this session, learn about five good ideas to help minimize the risk of a CRA audit and be in a good position if and when the CRA auditor gives your organization a call
     
    Five Good Ideas
    1. Know your charitable purpose and stay focused on furthering your mission
    2. Understand the CRA rules and regulations
    3. Organize your books and records
    4. Don’t be fearful if contacted by CRA
    5. Prepare! Prepare! Prepare! – Consult internally and with your advisors before CRA arrives
     
    Resources
    1. Chartered Professional Accountants (CPA) Canada: Not-for-profit governance: Summary resource guide
    2. Imagine Canada: Charity tax tools – record keeping
    3. Robert Hayhoe, Miller Thomson LLP: Canada Customs and Revenue Agency charity audits
    4. Canada Revenue Agency: Public policy dialogue and development activities by charities
    5. Canada Revenue Agency: Compliance and audits
    6. Canada Revenue Agency: Issuing receipts
     
    A cautionary note
    The ideas and resources are provided for general information purposes only. They are neither intended as, nor should be considered, legal advice, and readers and viewers are cautioned against making any decisions based on this material alone. Rather, a qualified lawyer should be consulted.
     
    About Susan Manwaring
    Susan Manwaring is a recognized leading expert advising social enterprises, charities and non-profits in her practice. Susan provides both general counsel and specialized tax advice to her clients across Canada and internationally. Susan is the national lead of the Social Impact Group at Miller Thomson LLP. In addition to her work as general counsel to charitie

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Management