18 episodes

The podcast for curious plant-lovers who want to learn more about their favourite green friends over a cup of tea. Your hostess Judith, plant-scientist by training, meets with other plant-lovers around the globe to explore the origins, history, biology, science, use and meaning of plants for us in the past, present and future.

Flora and Friends - Your botanical cup of tea Judith Lundberg-Felten

    • Science

The podcast for curious plant-lovers who want to learn more about their favourite green friends over a cup of tea. Your hostess Judith, plant-scientist by training, meets with other plant-lovers around the globe to explore the origins, history, biology, science, use and meaning of plants for us in the past, present and future.

    Plant microscopy love - A Flora-L story. Guests: Melissa and Delphine, Flora-L Design

    Plant microscopy love - A Flora-L story. Guests: Melissa and Delphine, Flora-L Design

    Flora-L Design creates print patterns from images of plants under the microscope. The three scientists behind the startup, Delphine, Melissa and podcast hostess Judith got to know each other as postdocs in Umeå, Sweden more than 10 years ago. They bonded over their love to plants, microscopy and textiles and founded Flora-L Design in 2019.

    In this podcast episode the three plant-biologists share
    - what their first contacts with plants were like as kids
    - from where their desire to study plants grew
    - what brought them to appreciate microscopy
    - how they see the process of making patterns from microscopy images
    - how they connect with plants in their everyday life
    - what they recommend as summer activities around plants

    • 54 min
    Fritillaria Icones - Bridging Science and Art - Part 2, Guest: Laurence Hill

    Fritillaria Icones - Bridging Science and Art - Part 2, Guest: Laurence Hill

    In this second part of my interview with botanical photographer Laurence Hill on fritillaria, we discuss
    - Which hurdles and opportunities non-formal scientists can face when wanting to publish scientific contributions
    - Why it is important to read more scientific literature than what one thinks may be important.
    - What we can learn about human history by looking at plants and their cultivation
    - How botanical art can be used to convey societal and philosophical thoughts
    - How to find inspiration and tell your story using plants.

    This interview is the 2nd part of my interview with Laurence Hill. In the first part he shared his journey into botanical photography with fritillaria and the reason for establishing his website Fritillaria icones that is a fountain of knowledge on this plant genus.

    • 51 min
    Fritillaria Icones - Bridging Science and Art, Guest: Laurence Hill

    Fritillaria Icones - Bridging Science and Art, Guest: Laurence Hill

    Laurence Hill has dedicated the past nineteen years of his freetime to document fritillaria plants in detail using his photographic skills. He has made this extensive and marvellous collection of botanical photographs on fritillaria available on his webpage "Fritillaria Icones" where scientists and people with botanical interest can freely use his resources. Laurence has also used his photographs for creating pieces of composite art for various exhibits in the UK and Poland. In this first (of two) part of my interview with Laurence he shared
    - how his botanical photography journey started with a garlic plant by the road in Greece
    - what it needs to take high resolution, detailed botanical photographs
    - how the life history of bulbous plants can be very special
    - how fritillaria plants from different provenances differ
    - what made him establish the Fritillaria Icones website
    - how he sees himself contributing to science with his botanical photography

    In the second part of this interview, to be released on 2021-06-09, Laurence will share insights and learnings from transforming botanical photography into pieces of art for exhibits.

    • 46 min
    Mountains of Fritillaria - Guest: Bob Wallis, The Fritillaria Group

    Mountains of Fritillaria - Guest: Bob Wallis, The Fritillaria Group

    Bob Wallis is the chairman of The Fritillaria Group in the UK. He has, together with his wife, grown and travelled the world to see fritillaria for over 50 years. In my interview with him he shared

    - how he first discovered his passion for fritillaries
    - how he learned about growing them and about their native habitats
    - how his holiday planing develops into research projects
    - stories from places around the Northern hemisphere he has travelled to
    - tips for those who want to travel to remote locations to find their favourite plants
    - how books written 100 years ago can still help today localizing plants in the wild
    - which fritillaries are easy to grow if you want to start your own fritillaria garden

    Accompanying to this episode you will find two short videos with Bob on the Fritillaria genus and a travel to an alpine area in Anatolia with lots of pictures of native fritillaries.

    • 42 min
    Fritillaria - A feast for bumblebees - Guest: Katarzyna Roguz, University of Warsaw Botanic Garden

    Fritillaria - A feast for bumblebees - Guest: Katarzyna Roguz, University of Warsaw Botanic Garden

    Katarzyna Roguz, researcher at the University of Warsaw Botanic Garden has studied Fritillaria meleagris since she started doing research during her Bachelor thesis and through her Masters and PhD theses at the University of Warsaw and her recent postdoc at Tel Aviv University, Israel. She has dedicated her research to the pollination biology of Fritillaria meleagris, F. persica and recently F. imperialis. I had the pleasure to have Katarzyna as my podcast guest and we talked about
    - Why F. meleagris is so important for bumblebees
    - How pollination biology studies are carried out
    - Why plants may adjust self-(in)compatibility depending on where they grow
    - That even birds can be important for Fritillaria imperialis pollination
    - Why planted Fritillaria imperialis in the city centre of Warsaw is an interesting study object for pollination biology

    • 44 min
    Fritillaria - Serendipity on the King's meadow - Guest: Håkan Rydin, Uppsala University

    Fritillaria - Serendipity on the King's meadow - Guest: Håkan Rydin, Uppsala University

    Fritillaria meleagris (Kungsängslilja) is blooming in thousands on the King's meadow in Uppsala, Sweden, every year in May and has been studied in this location for over 80 years. In my interview with Håkan Rydin, emeritus professor at Uppsala University, we explore how this popular plant that is native to the Mediteranian and Caucasian region has ended up in Uppsala, why it has become so popular and why the king's meadow and fritillaria have been of interest for research.

    • 34 min

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