80 episodes

Weekly recordings of live seminars presented to the Friedman community in Boston by researchers and practitioners in the field of nutrition.

Friedman Seminar Series Tufts University

    • Medicine

Weekly recordings of live seminars presented to the Friedman community in Boston by researchers and practitioners in the field of nutrition.

    • video
    The 2011 Famine in Somalia: Beyond a Food Security Crisis

    The 2011 Famine in Somalia: Beyond a Food Security Crisis

    This Friedman Seminar features Daniel Maxwell, professor, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and acting director, Feinstein International Center, presenting “The 2011 Famine in Somalia: Beyond a Food Security Crisis."

    Abstract
    This presentation will be based on Professor Maxwell’s retrospective research on the 2011 famine in South Central Somalia, that resulted in the recent book, Famine in Somalia: Competing Imperatives, Collective Failures (Oxford University Press, 2016). The presentation will trace the causes and consequences of the food security, malnutrition and mortality crisis, but then address the complicating factors that made this such a deadly crisis. Some 258,000 people lost their lives in the famine, and hundreds of thousands more were displaced or had their livelihoods severely disrupted. These complications include the history and political economy of three-plus decades of continuous humanitarian assistance in Southern Somalia, the rule of Al Shabaab and the war between Al Shabaab and the fledgling Somali Transitional Federal Government, its Africa Union partners, and expeditionary forces from Kenya and Ethiopia, donor counter terrorism policies that put a significant constraint on external humanitarian assistance, the engagement of non-western humanitarian actors, the role of the diaspora and urban-based lineage and kin groups in responding to the crisis, and the way in which internal social dynamics shaped both the crisis itself and brutal abuses that people faced when displaced.

    Bio
    Daniel Maxwell is a Professor and the Acting Director of the Feinstein International Center at Tufts’ Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. He leads the research program on food security and livelihoods in complex emergencies. He served as the Chair of the Department of Food and Nutrition Policy at the Friedman School from 2008 to 2011. Through his research, Dan works with governments, agencies, and affected communities to build the evidence base for improved humanitarian and resilience programming and policy. He recently published Famine in Somalia: Competing Imperatives, Collective Failures (Oxford University Press, 2016) with Nisar Majid. He is the co-author, with Chris Barrett of Cornell University, of Food Aid After Fifty Years: Recasting Its Role (Routledge, 2005), and co-author with Peter Walker, of Shaping the Humanitarian World (Routledge, 2009).

    Prior to academia, Dan spent twenty years in leadership positions with international NGOs and research institutes. He was Deputy Regional Director for CARE International in Eastern and Central Africa, Rockefeller Post-Doctoral Fellow the International Food Policy Research Institute, and worked for Mennonite Central Committee for ten years in Tanzania and Uganda. He holds a B.Sc. from Wilmington College, a Master’s degree from Cornell, and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin.

    About the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy:
    The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight degree programs – which focus on questions relating to nutrition and chronic diseases, molecular nutrition, agriculture and sustainability, food security, humanitarian assistance, public health nutrition, and food policy and economics – are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy.

    • 1 hr
    • video
    Food technology, industrialization and commercialization- Can we bring back the humanity of eating?

    Food technology, industrialization and commercialization- Can we bring back the humanity of eating?

    This Friedman Seminar features Jeffrey Zurofsky, Founder & CEO, No Small Plans, LLC, Co-founder and former President & CEO, ’wichcraft, Riverpark, Riverpark Farm, presenting “Food technology, industrialization and commercialization- Can we bring back the humanity of eating?”

    Bio:
    Most recently, Jeffrey can be found writing about his experiences on his blog, jeffreyzurofsky.com, creating the nourishment program for Summit Series, and as co-host on Bravo’s new restaurant competition show “Best New Restaurant”. Jeffrey advises over 10 companies in his quest to help entrepreneurs build their dreams into realities. Jeffrey was also a key advisor and contributor to Tim Ferriss’ The 4-Hour Chef.
    In 2003, Jeffrey partnered with chefs Tom Colicchio and Sisha Ortúzar to co-found ’wichcraft as a sandwich shop where the ingredients and cooking techniques are rooted in fine dining but served in a casual and welcoming environment. Since then Jeffrey has all aspects of the business ’wichcraft, spearheading its expansion to fifteen stores including locations in San Francisco and Las Vegas and employing over four-hundred team members.
    In 2009, the original partnership opened Riverpark, a fine dining restaurant that was recently awarded 2-stars by the New York Times, as well as the innovative Riverpark Farm, New York’s most urban farm, located adjacent to the restaurant..
    Prior to the founding of ’wichcraft, Jeffrey worked in some of Manhattan’s most prestigious kitchens including a stage at Lespinasse, Savoy (while enrolled at the French Culinary Institute), Union Square Café, and as opening sous chef at Restaurant AZ. With desire to leave the stove and feed his entrepreneurial passion, Jeffrey took an offer at a tech startup, Bank Pass as Director of Business Development where he developed his interest in business growth. After honing his business acumen, Jeffrey found his way back to his passion at Payard where was Director of Operations and CFO at Francois Payard Patisserie and Bistro.
    Jeffrey’s passion as an entrepreneur and love for food started at the age of eight, attempting to replicate in his family’s New Jersey kitchen what he saw master chefs create on classic PBS cooking shows. His mother, a small business owner, encouraged his budding interest in everything culinary and Jeffrey put his self-taught skills to work in professional kitchens while studying at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He paid his way through school in the area’s best restaurants, and eventually became sous chef at the Mobil 4-star La Residence. Upon graduation, he moved to New York City and where he has been able to feed his desire to develop new and innovative ideas in a fast paced environment.
    In addition to Jeffrey’s many job accomplishments, he was recently awarded Outstanding Alumni from The International Culinary Center in 2011. He continues to be committed to numerous civic and philanthropic institutions and has passionately supported entrepreneurial ventures throughout his career.

    About the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy:
    The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight degree programs – which focus on questions relating to nutrition and chronic diseases, molecular nutrition, agriculture and sustainability, food security, humanitarian assistance, public health nutrition, and food policy and economics – are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy.

    • 56 min
    • video
    Genetically-Engineered Crops: Where we have been and where we might be going

    Genetically-Engineered Crops: Where we have been and where we might be going

    This Friedman Seminar features Tim Griffin, associate professor, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, presenting “Genetically-Engineered Crops: Where we have been and where we might be going”

    Bio
    Tim Griffin is an Associate Professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University. At Friedman, he has directed the interdisciplinary graduate program, Agriculture, Food and the Environment since 2009, and teaches classes on U.S. agriculture, and agricultural science and policy. His current research focuses on regional food system and climate change impacts on agriculture, and he supervises doctoral students conducting research on topics ranging from precision agriculture to food access. Dr. Griffin served on the National Academy of Sciences study committee that published Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects. He also served as an Advisor to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, focusing on Sustainability. Before coming to the Friedman School in 2008, he was Research Agronomist and Lead Scientist with the USDA-Agriculture Research Service in Orono, ME, from 2000 to 2008. From 1992 to 2000, he was the Extension Sustainable Agriculture Specialist at the University of Maine, the first such position in the U.S.

    Abstract
    Genetically-engineered crops (“GE crops”) have been used by farmers for just two decades. In the short span since the mid-1990s, GE crops have been rapidly adopted by farmers producing a short list of crops in some countries, and are banned outright in others. There have been myriad claims regarding GE crops, from feeding the world to ecosystem disruption to human health impacts. This stimulated the National Academy of Sciences, in 2014, to undertake a very broad assessment of purported benefits and risks of GE crops that are already being used by farmers around the world. The report from this effort was released in May, 2016, and also assessed potential uses of GE techniques in the future and suggested changes in the regulatory framework for these products. The past and current uses and impacts of GE crops, along with prospects for the future, will all be addressed in this seminar.

    About the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy:
    The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight degree programs – which focus on questions relating to nutrition and chronic diseases, molecular nutrition, agriculture and sustainability, food security, humanitarian assistance, public health nutrition, and food policy and economics – are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    • video
    Planetary health and nutrition: Tracking the human nutritional consequences of accelerating global environmental change

    Planetary health and nutrition: Tracking the human nutritional consequences of accelerating global environmental change

    This Friedman Seminar features Sam Myers, Senior Research Scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, presenting “Planetary health and nutrition: Tracking the human nutritional consequences of accelerating global environmental change.”

    Bio:
    Samuel Myers, MD, MPH works at the intersection of human health and global environmental change. He is a Senior Research Scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is also Director of the Planetary Health Alliance. Sam’s current work spans several areas of planetary health including 1) the global nutritional impacts of rising concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere; 2) the health impacts of land management decisions in SE Asia associated with biomass burning and particulate air pollution; 3) the nutritional impacts of reduced access to wildlife (bushmeat) in the diet in Madagascar; 4) the local (in Madagascar) and global consequences of fisheries decline for human nutrition and health; and 5) the impact of animal pollinator declines on human nutrition at a global scale. As the Director of the Planetary Health Alliance, Sam oversees a multi-institutional effort to support research, education and policy efforts around the world focused on understanding and quantifying the human health impacts of global environmental change and translating that understanding into resource management decisions globally. Dr. Myers serves as a Commissioner on the Lancet-Rockefeller Foundation Commission on Planetary Health and was recently awarded the Prince Albert II of Monaco—Institut Pasteur Award 2015 for research at the interface of global environmental change and human health.

    Abstract:
    We find ourselves at an interesting moment in human history when global food demand is rising more steeply than ever before in human history at the same time that many of the fundamental biophysical conditions that underpin global food production (agriculture, animal husbandry, fisheries) are changing much more rapidly than ever before in human history. I will briefly discuss some of the global trends and introduce the concept of Planetary Health. Then I will introduce some of our group’s research into nutritional consequences of some of these trends (rising CO2, pollinator declines, changes in the status of global fisheries, access to bushmeat) and discuss some of the important data gaps to move this field forward.

    About the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy:
    The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight degree programs – which focus on questions relating to nutrition and chronic diseases, molecular nutrition, agriculture and sustainability, food security, humanitarian assistance, public health nutrition, and food policy and economics – are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy.

    • 1 hr
    • video
    Like a kid in a candy shop: What do we know about how kids spend their own money?

    Like a kid in a candy shop: What do we know about how kids spend their own money?

    This Friedman Seminar features Sean B. Cash, Ph.D, associate professor, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, presenting “Like a kid in a candy shop: What do we know about how kids spend their own money?” This seminar was originally held on 9/21/2016.

    Bio:
    Sean B. Cash is an economist and associate professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University with expertise in food labeling, ethical consumption, and consumer behavior. He also is an adjunct professor at the University of Alberta. His research focuses on how food, nutrition, and environmental policies affect both producers and consumers. Ongoing and recent projects in this area include the efficacy of food label and price interventions as public health and environmental tools; how consumers value social aspects of food relative to other attributes; and how point-of-sale messaging impacts consumers’ demand for food. He also conducts research in the areas of environmental regulation and resource conservation.

    Abstract:
    What do kids do with their own money? In general there is a lack of research that considers children as independent consumers despite the fact that many children have some amount of purchasing power, much of which is directed towards food purchases. Much of this spent on energy-dense, nutrient-poor (EDNP) foods. This talk focuses on what we have learned about how kids spend their own money, why we should care, and how Tufts researchers have been trying to apply economic, psychological, and nutritional insights to guide children away from EDNP foods and towards more healthful alternatives.

    About the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy:
    The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight degree programs – which focus on questions relating to nutrition and chronic diseases, molecular nutrition, agriculture and sustainability, food security, humanitarian assistance, public health nutrition, and food policy and economics – are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy.

    • 57 min
    • video
    Dean's Medal Ceremony: “Tackling Childhood Obesity: A Conversation with Peter R. Dolan”

    Dean's Medal Ceremony: “Tackling Childhood Obesity: A Conversation with Peter R. Dolan”

    The 2016 Friedman School Dean’s Medal Ceremony honored Peter R. Dolan, A78, A08P, Chairman, Tufts University Board of Trustees, for his many accomplishments and extraordinary service to Tufts University.
    The Dean’s Medal is the highest honor awarded by each school at Tufts, reserved for those select individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the university and the greater community. This event was held Wednesday, September 14, 2016.

    About the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy:
    The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight degree programs – which focus on questions relating to nutrition and chronic diseases, molecular nutrition, agriculture and sustainability, food security, humanitarian assistance, public health nutrition, and food policy and economics – are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy.

    • 53 min

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