100 episodes

Teaching the world to play jazz guitar one tune at a time. Focussing on improvisation, jazz chords, chord melody, & chord soloing.

Guitar, Life, Whatever Matthew Warnock

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

Teaching the world to play jazz guitar one tune at a time. Focussing on improvisation, jazz chords, chord melody, & chord soloing.

    How to Play Bb Jazz Blues Chords

    How to Play Bb Jazz Blues Chords

    Grab your guitar, because in today’s practice session you learn how to play fun & cool-sounding chords for the Bb jazz blues progression.
     
    When learning how to play jazz blues, you often learn big, bulky, chords that are tough to play and honestly...don’t sound like jazz at all.
     
    In this lesson, you learn how to play killer jazz blues chords that are easy to play, sound great, and bring an authentic jazz sound to your comping today.
     
    First, you learn each four-bar section one at a time, memorizing the chord shapes as you play.
     
    Next, you add rhythms to your comping as you play the full 12-bar jazz blues progression.
     
    To finish, you comp with these jazz chords over my walking bassline as you jam a full jazz blues progression in less than 15 mins.
     
    Have fun as you learn these chords, add them to your comping, and elevate your jazz chord vocabulary all in one fun practice session.
     
    Get the TAB and practice tips for these chords here.
     
    https://www.mwgcourses.com/p/jazz-blues-chord-progression
     
     
    Lesson Content
     
    0:00 – Intro
    0:21 – What You Learn
    0:50 – Bb13 Chord
    2:05 – Eb9 Chord
    4:38 – G7#9 Chord
    6:32 – Cm7-F7#9 Chords
    7:40 – Blues Turnaround Chords
    9:12 – Bb Jazz Blues Progression
    10:00 – Charleston Rhythm
    12:08 – Jazz Blues Picking
    13:35 – Bb Jazz Blues Jam
    14:42 – Where to Go Next

    • 15 min
    Easy Jazz Soloing - 1 Arpeggio = 3 Chords

    Easy Jazz Soloing - 1 Arpeggio = 3 Chords

    Grab your guitar, because today you’re learning 1 easy arpeggio that makes soloing over minor ii-V-I progressions a piece of cake.
     
    When learning jazz guitar, you often spend a ton of time on major ii-V-I soloing devices and concepts.
     
    It’s an easy progression to get started on as you can use the major scale to outline each chord in the beginning. Plus…
     
    There are tons of famous major ii-V-I phrases and licks to learn and add to your jazz guitar solos.
     
    But.
     
    What happens to many of us, myself included when I was first learning, is you nail major ii-V-I lines and then just kind of guess or fumble through minor ii-V-I’s.
     
    Yes, minor ii-V-I’s are tougher to solo over than their major cousin. But…
     
    That doesn’t mean there aren’t shortcuts you can take to solo over minor ii-V-I’s today, sound good, and build a foundation for further study down the road.
     
    In this lesson you do just that.
     
    First, you learn how to play a Cm7b5 arpeggio.
     
    Next, you slide that arpeggio up the neck to solo over F7alt with the exact same shape.
     
    To finish, you slide the shape up again to solo over Bbm7 with a m7b5 arpeggio.
     
    One arpeggio, three chords, endless possibilities.
     
    Oh, and you put a strong focus on developing melodies in your jazz solos as well with these interactive exercises.
     
    Have fun soloing over minor ii-V-I’s in this practice session. And…
     
    Grab the TAB and practice tips for these arpeggios here.
     
     
     
    Lesson Contents
     
    0:00 – Intro
    1:05 – Cm7b5 Arpeggio
    4:24 – F7alt Arpeggio
    8:06 – Melodic Development
    10:03 – Bbm7 Arpeggio
    14:14 – Repetition Exercise
    15:28 – Further Study
     
     

    • 16 min
    Easy Minor Jazz Progression - Jazz Guitar Practice Session

    Easy Minor Jazz Progression - Jazz Guitar Practice Session

    Grab your guitar, because in today’s practice session you’re playing one of my favorite minor ii-V-I chord patterns.
     
    When learning jazz guitar chords, you spend a lot of time on major ii-V-I’s, jazz blues, and other progressions.
     
    But.
     
    What about minor key jazz progressions?
     
    Yes, they can be more challenging than major key ii-V-I’s at first. And…
     
    With some helpful voicings, a fun practice routine, and some reps on your fretboard, you’ll be nailing minor key ii-V-I chords in no time.
     
    In this lesson, you begin by comping some of my favorite minor ii-V-I chord shapes.
     
    Next, you learn how to apply an essential jazz rhythm to those chords, before separating the top note from the chord to sound like 2 guitars.
     
    How cool is that?
     
    Then, you finish by personalizing the chords in your comping as you and I jam together over the minor ii-V-I progression.
     
    Have fun as you learn new chord shapes, build up your minor chord progression skill set, and expand your creative comping vocabulary in this lesson.
     
    Go here to get the TAB and practice tips for this lesson.
     
    https://www.mwgcourses.com/p/easy-jazz-progression-minor
     
    Lesson Content
     
    0:00 – Intro
    0:48 – Am7b5 Chord Shape
    2:10 – D7b9 Chord Shape
    3:47 – Gm11 Chord Shape
    5:45 – Gm9 Chord Shape
    8:15 – Jazz Rhythm Pattern
    11:56 – Jazz Picking Pattern
    14:59 – ii-V-I Progression

    • 16 min
    Easy Jazz Pentatonic Scale Pattern

    Easy Jazz Pentatonic Scale Pattern

    Grab your guitar because today I’m sharing with you a fun & essential jazz pentatonic scale pattern.
     
    In today’s lesson, you learn how to turn plain ole pentatonic scales into hip sounding jazz lines and solos, no complicated theory.
     
    First, you warm up your ears, hands, & creativity by soloing with Am pentatonic over my jazz blues comping.
     
    Next, you add in the jazz pentatonic scale pattern into a soloing workout before sequencing that pattern through the full-scale shape.
     
    Then, you learn how to displace the rhythm with this jazz pattern so you can use it in your solos and not sound like an exercise.
     
    Lastly, you add in sidestepping to bring a hip, inside-outside sound to your jazz guitar solos.
     
    Have fun as you expand your jazz soloing skill set with a fun & easy to play jazz pentatonic scale pattern.
     
    Get the TAB and practice tips for this lesson here.
     
    https://www.mwgcourses.com/p/jazz-pentatonic-scale-pattern
     
    Lesson Contents
     
    0:00 Intro
    0:25 Jazz Blues Warmup
    2:07 Jazz Pentatonic Pattern
    5:02 Jazz Pentatonic Sequence
    10:10 Jazz Pentatonic Rhythms
    12:24 Pentatonic Sidestepping
    15:56 Where to go Next

    • 16 min
    Charleston Rhythm for Guitar

    Charleston Rhythm for Guitar

    Grab your guitar, because today you’re playing one of my favorite, and one of the most important jazz rhythms, the Charleston.
    When comping over jazz standards, you often focus on chords, subs, chromatic chords, etc.
    But.
    What about rhythms?
    Practicing comping rhythms elevates every chord, sub, and chromatic idea you play by locking into the groove of the tune.
    In this lesson, you explore the Charleston rhythm in 3 ways.
    First, you play it over an Am7 chord vamp.
    Next, you play the Charleston over an Am7-D7, ii-V, chord progression.
    To finish, you split the Charleston rhythm, so the first attack is on Am7 and the second attack is on D7.
    In each exercise, we play the rhythm together, so you get it into your hands & ears.
    Then, I walk a bassline and you comp the rhythms to further integrate them into your comping.
    Have fun playing the Charleston rhythm in this lesson and over jazz standards in your comping.
    Get the TAB and practice tips for this lesson here.
     
    https://www.mwgcourses.com/p/charleston-rhythm-guitar
     
    Lesson Content
     
    0:00 – Intro
    0:23 – Charleston Am7 Chord
    1:17 – Am7 Walking Bass
    1:45 – Am7-D7 Chords
    2:53 – Am7-D7 Walking Bass
    3:35 – Splitting the Chords
    4:22 – 2 Beats Per Chord
    5:15 – Where to Go Next
     
     
     

    • 6 min
    Jazz Rhythm Workout - Quarter Note Soloing

    Jazz Rhythm Workout - Quarter Note Soloing

    Grab your guitar because today I’m sharing with you a killer exercise that is guaranteed to turbo charge your jazz soloing rhythms.
     
    When learning how to solo over jazz standards and progressions, you learn scales, modes, arpeggios, licks, patterns, and more.
     
    But.
     
    What about rhythm?
     
    Rhythm is the most important element in a successful jazz guitar solo.
     
    It’s so important, that you can play a Coltrane solo note for note, and without solid rhythms, it falls flat. And…
     
    You can play one note for an entire solo with strong, accurate, and swinging rhythms, and it’ll sound amazing.
     
    Soloing rhythms are that powerful.
     
    In this lesson, you explore a quarter-note soloing workout that’s guaranteed to take your jazz improvisations to the next level of creativity.
     
    First, you solo with steady quarter notes, locking in with the bassline as you improvise.
     
    Next, you add a single rest to each beat of the bar as you focus in on playing both quarter notes and quarter rests in your solos.
     
    To finish, you freely improvise over a ii-V-I progression as these new rhythms begin to appear in your solos organically.
     
    Have fun as you get a quarter-note workout in today’s jazz soloing lesson.
     
    Get the TAB and notation for this lesson here.
     
     
    https://www.mwgcourses.com/p/jazz-rhythms-quarter-notes
     
     
     
    Lesson Contents
     
    0:00 – Intro
    1:00 – Soloing Exercise #1
    1:45 – Soloing Exercise #2
    2:55 – Soloing Exercise #3
    4:03 – Soloing Exercise #4
    5:03 – Soloing Exercise #5
    6:10 – Soloing Exercise #6
    7:27 – Further Practice

    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Arts

CBC Radio
Roman Mars
CBC Radio
Avery Trufelman
NPR
The Moth

You Might Also Like

Greg O'Rourke: Professional Jazz Guitarist and Founder of Fret Dojo
Jude Gold
Dipped in Tone
Phillip Mcknight
Ben Martin
Lee Anderson