31 episodes

Human Bulletin, produced by the Science Bulletins program at the American Museum of Natural History, explores the science of our species, covering fossil and genetic studies of human evolution as well as new research on human health.

Human Bulleti‪n‬ American Museum of Natural History

    • Science

Human Bulletin, produced by the Science Bulletins program at the American Museum of Natural History, explores the science of our species, covering fossil and genetic studies of human evolution as well as new research on human health.

    • video
    Doc - Guinea Worm: Countdown to Zero

    Doc - Guinea Worm: Countdown to Zero

    Guinea worm, a parasite that once affected millions of people each year, may soon be relegated to the past. Thanks to improved health education and community efforts, only 148 cases were reported in 2013. In remote areas of South Sudan where guinea worm still prevails, health workers and epidemiologists track the parasite in an effort to eliminate the disease permanently.

    • 9 min
    • video
    News - Sunken Remains Illuminate Native American Lineage

    News - Sunken Remains Illuminate Native American Lineage

    In an underwater cave in the Yucatán, divers discovered a near-complete human skeleton dating to the first wave of migration to North America. DNA evidence from these remains is helping scientists solve a long-standing mystery about whether contemporary Native Americans are descended from these first American arrivals.

    • 2 min
    • video
    News - Deciphering History’s Deadliest Pandemic

    News - Deciphering History’s Deadliest Pandemic

    The unusual severity of 1918’s “Spanish flu” pandemic has eluded explanation for nearly a century. Unlike typical flu epidemics, most of the victims in 1918 were otherwise healthy adults that succumbed to secondary infections. Unexpectedly, children and the elderly frequently recovered. The answer may lie in the 1918 flu's evolutionary relationship to other flu strains that infected different generations in childhood.

    • 2 min
    • video
    News - Brains Process Sounds into Sight

    News - Brains Process Sounds into Sight

    When someone is blind from birth, what happens in their brain’s visual cortex? Scientists have long thought that this portion of the brain was repurposed, processing the input from a sense other than sight. But technology designed to help blind people “see” using soundscapes tells a different story. Brain scans in blind individuals using this system reveal vision-related brain activity similar to that in sighted people.

    • 2 min
    • video
    News - Neanderthal DNA Persists in Humans

    News - Neanderthal DNA Persists in Humans

    When modern humans migrated out of Africa between 100,000 and 60,000 years ago, they encountered and bred with Neanderthals, our close relatives living in Europe and Asia. For people of non-African descent, approximately 2 percent of their genome has some Neanderthal DNA. New research is investigating which components of the Neanderthal genome survive today—and what traits they influence.

    • 2 min
    • video
    News - Mapping Emotions in the Body

    News - Mapping Emotions in the Body

    Feelings are often associated with physical reactions: terror can send chills down your spine, and love can leave you weak in the knees. A recent study has linked specific emotions to physical sensations. Researchers tested emotional responses in hundreds of subjects and then created maps identifying locations in the body where emotions cause physical changes.

    • 2 min

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