7 episodes

Questions of land rights are at the root of most current conflicts between indigenous peoples and the wider state. Competing conceptions of the land and authority over the land intersect with conflicts around resource extraction, the terms of consultation and consent, and the political status of indigenous peoples. Without resolving the conflicts around land in a fair and collaborative manner, real reconciliation will be difficult to achieve.

This podcast presents a series of six live panel presentations delivered at the Indigenous Land Rights and Reconciliation workshop at Queen’s University in September of 2019. The series theorizes the justifications for land rights from indigenous perspectives and investigates how these understandings challenge and enrich theories in the Western tradition. The discussion also confronts the implications of these understandings for the political and legal practice.

The Indigenous Land Rights and Reconciliation project sought to meet three key objectives: to provide an open platform for indigenous people to voice their views on land, self-governance, and relationships; to explore ways of indigenizing political theory and method; and to promote respectful and reciprocal collaboration between indigenous and non-indigenous scholars.

We encourage you to visit our website at www.queensu.ca/csdd/landrights to follow the project and its future efforts.

Thank-you to our Sponsors and Supporters

Government of Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Forskningsradet: The Research Council of Norway

Department of Political Studies, Queen’s University

Centre for the Study of Democracy and Diversity, Queen’s University

Globalizing Minority Rights, UiT: The Arctic University of Norway

CFRC Kingston

The Louis Riel Reel is performed and provided by Traditional Métis Fiddler, Patti Kusturok https://www.pattikusturok.com/

Indigenous Land Rights and Reconciliation Podcast – CFRC Podcast Network CFRC.ca Podcast Network

    • Social Sciences

Questions of land rights are at the root of most current conflicts between indigenous peoples and the wider state. Competing conceptions of the land and authority over the land intersect with conflicts around resource extraction, the terms of consultation and consent, and the political status of indigenous peoples. Without resolving the conflicts around land in a fair and collaborative manner, real reconciliation will be difficult to achieve.

This podcast presents a series of six live panel presentations delivered at the Indigenous Land Rights and Reconciliation workshop at Queen’s University in September of 2019. The series theorizes the justifications for land rights from indigenous perspectives and investigates how these understandings challenge and enrich theories in the Western tradition. The discussion also confronts the implications of these understandings for the political and legal practice.

The Indigenous Land Rights and Reconciliation project sought to meet three key objectives: to provide an open platform for indigenous people to voice their views on land, self-governance, and relationships; to explore ways of indigenizing political theory and method; and to promote respectful and reciprocal collaboration between indigenous and non-indigenous scholars.

We encourage you to visit our website at www.queensu.ca/csdd/landrights to follow the project and its future efforts.

Thank-you to our Sponsors and Supporters

Government of Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Forskningsradet: The Research Council of Norway

Department of Political Studies, Queen’s University

Centre for the Study of Democracy and Diversity, Queen’s University

Globalizing Minority Rights, UiT: The Arctic University of Norway

CFRC Kingston

The Louis Riel Reel is performed and provided by Traditional Métis Fiddler, Patti Kusturok https://www.pattikusturok.com/

    Episode 6 – Interacting with the State, Part II

    Episode 6 – Interacting with the State, Part II

    The

    “Interacting with the State” panels emphasize different legal regimes which

    currently define relationships between indigenous people’s and the state. Our

    final episode of the series features discussions on the duty to Consult, Metis

    land claims, and legal definitions of territory and sovereignty.







    Featuring:







    * Avigail Eisenberg (University of

    Victoria) “Consultation, Consent, and Resistance”* Janique Dubois (University of Ottawa)

    “To What End? Negotiating Metis Land Rights in Manitoba”* Mark Walters (Queen’s University) “Reconciling

    Legal Ideas about Territory and Sovereignty in Canada”

    • 56 min
    Episode 5 – Land Restitution as Reconciliation

    Episode 5 – Land Restitution as Reconciliation

    This

    episode features a rich discussion of the movements toward

    reconciliation which will be necessary in order to fruitfully navigate these

    ongoing tensions around land and land rights.







    Featuring:







    * Esme Murdock (San Diego State

    University) “Speaking Land, Speaking Ourselves”* Dimitri Panagos (Memorial University

    of Newfoundland) “Reconciliation, Duties and Distributive Justice”* Avery Kolers (University of

    Louisville) “Territorial Loss and Reconciliation” , presented by Burke Hendrix

    • 45 min
    Episode 4 – Non-Indigenous Understandings of Land

    Episode 4 – Non-Indigenous Understandings of Land

    This

    episode’s discussion focuses on largely Western ideas regarding the ontology of

    land and the relationships between people, the state, and the land, offering a

    critical perspective on the dominant and colonial approaches to land which have

    historically guided our understandings of land and land rights.







    Featuring:







    * Alejandra Mancilla (University of

    Oslo) “A Continent of and for Whiteness? “White” Colonialism and the

    1959 Antarctic Treaty” * Kerstin Reibold (UiT: Arctic

    University of Norway) “The Cultural and Historical Perspective of Welfare

    Egalitarianism”* Margaret Moore (Queen’s University) “Indigenous

    Land Rights and State Territorial Rights”

    • 45 min
    Episode 3 – Interacting with the State, Part I

    Episode 3 – Interacting with the State, Part I

    The

    “Interacting with the State” panels emphasize different legal regimes which

    currently define relationships between indigenous people’s and the state. Part

    1 features presentations on Mining Development and Modern Treaty-making.







    Featuring:







    * Julia Gilpin and Karine Vanthuyne (University

    of Ottawa) “Reconciling the Indigenous Right to Self-determination with Mining

    Development”* Veldon Coburn (Carleton University) “Lessons

    from the Algonquin Modern Treaty”* Timothy Goodwin (Victorian Bar) – “Reconciliation

    and Land Rights in Australia: A Legal Perspective”

    • 48 min
    Episode 2 – Changing the Paradigm

    Episode 2 – Changing the Paradigm

    This

    episode features a set of three paper presentations. The panel examines different

    understandings of our relationships with the land and particularly highlights those

    traditional relationships which are challenging the western and colonial

    interpretations of relationships to the land.







    Featuring:







    * Jeff Corntassel (University of

    Victoria) “How will the Land Recognize You? Regenerating Indigenous

    Relationships Amidst Reconciliation Discourses” * Burke Hendrix (University of Oregon)

    “Land as a Matrix for Responsibilities of Reciprocity”* Cindy Holder (University of Victoria)

    “Indigenous Peoples’ Human Right to Land”

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Episode 1 – The Ontologies of Land

    Episode 1 – The Ontologies of Land

    This

    episode features a roundtable of three indigenous speakers, presenting their

    own understandings of the concept of land and the inherent contradictions and

    controversies as they consider wider ontological approaches to the land.







    Featuring:







    * Dale Turner (University of Toronto)* Paula Sherman (Trent University)* Robert Lovelace (Queen’s University)

    • 1 hr

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