20 episodes

Korean Kontext is an initiative by the Korea Economic Institute in Washington, D.C. Its aim is to provide listeners with a source for broad-based, substantive information about the U.S.-Korean relationship from all angles: political, cultural, economic, and social. Tackling major topics using current and historical context, interviews with prominent policy leaders, scholars,and artists, and in-depth analysis, Korean Kontext is crafted to inform the newcomer and the Korea guru alike.

Korean Kontext Korea Economic Institute

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Korean Kontext is an initiative by the Korea Economic Institute in Washington, D.C. Its aim is to provide listeners with a source for broad-based, substantive information about the U.S.-Korean relationship from all angles: political, cultural, economic, and social. Tackling major topics using current and historical context, interviews with prominent policy leaders, scholars,and artists, and in-depth analysis, Korean Kontext is crafted to inform the newcomer and the Korea guru alike.

    Korea and the Persian Gulf: Troy Stangarone

    Korea and the Persian Gulf: Troy Stangarone

    2020 is starting off dramatically with the escalation of tensions in the Middle East - The world held its breath while the United States and Iran exchanged both blows and barbs.
    In the weeks that followed, tensions fortunately deescalated. But in the aftermath, the European Union has accused Tehran of reneging elements of the nuclear deal. Although the Trump administration had already abandoned the nuclear deal in May 2018, Tehran’s abrogation could lead to the reimposition of further sanctions. And so, the situation remains deeply volatile. 
    So it’s a good time to review what risks South Korea faces if a conflict flairs up in the Middle East. Would Korean troops be deployed to the region? How long could the South Korean economy last without its vital oil supplies? Are there alternative suppliers? And what would this mean for negotiations with North Korea?
    KEI Senior Director Troy Stangarone will answer all these questions in this episode.

    • 27 min
    Sharing the Burden: Song Min-soon

    Sharing the Burden: Song Min-soon

    This week, the United States and South Korea failed to reach an agreement on how to share the cost for U.S. troops deployed on the Korean Peninsula. 
    The two countries had failed to come to an agreement last December as well - ultimately settling on a one-year deal in February of this year where South Korea increased its contribution from around $800 million to nearly $1 billion.
    In the current round of negotiations, the Trump administration has sought a 400% increase. A payment of $4.7 billion that would cover the entire cost of U.S. troop deployment and more. 
    The position of the U.S. government has elicited concerns both in South Korea and the United States. Long-time policy watchers have raised worries that this may weaken the alliance at a vital juncture in U.S. engagements in the region, or push South Korea to take radical steps to better protect itself against the North Korean threat, such as the acquisition of nuclear weapons. 
    Our guest today, former ROK Foreign Minister Song Min-soon, is one of the original architects of the burden-sharing agreement between the United States and the Republic of Korea. He is also a long-time policy practitioner who worked on U.S.-Korea relations. He joins us today to provide his view of relations between the two countries.
    Here is the link to KEI's event on U.S. approach to defense burden-sharing: https://youtu.be/CH0jHNB5OwQ 
    And you can find KEI fellow Kyle Ferrier’s paper on the monetary value of Korea’s contributions to U.S. foreign policy here: http://www.keia.org/sites/default/files/publications/kei_monitoring_the_linchpin_191205.pdf
     

    • 26 min
    Impeachment, Part 2: Consequences

    Impeachment, Part 2: Consequences

    This week, Congress introduced 2 articles of impeachment against President Trump. One for abuse of power and one for obstruction of Congress.
    The ongoing confrontation between the White House and U.S. Congress will likely engross President Donald Trump’s political attention in the months ahead. Given his central role in executing highly delicate negotiations with North Korea and high-stakes face-off over trade with China, the question on many people’s minds is how the impeachment inquiry may affect the U.S. government’s execution of foreign policy. Our guest today, KEI Senior Director Troy Stangarone, addresses this topic head-on. 
    This is part two of the episodes dealing with impeachment - specifically addressing how the impeachment will affect U.S. negotiations with North Korea. 
    If you haven’t listened to part 1 on the precedents set by the impeachment inquiries against Presidents Nixon and Clinton, I highly recommend you going back and listening to the episode. You can find it here:
    https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-yymkb-ca17b9
     

    • 24 min
    Impeachment, Part 1: Precedent

    Impeachment, Part 1: Precedent

    The ongoing confrontation between the White House and U.S. Congress will likely engross President Donald Trump’s political attention in the months ahead. Given his central role in executing highly delicate negotiations with North Korea and high-stakes face-off over trade with China, the question on many people’s minds is how the impeachment inquiry may affect the U.S. government’s execution of foreign policy. 
    Two most recent cases of impeachment proceedings against an incumbent president provide insights into what domestic and international observers could expect going forward. Our interns, Soojin Hwang and Rachel Kirsch review precedents set by Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.
    This is the first of two episodes dealing with the impeachment scandal. 
    Please also find Soojin and Rachel's accompanying blog post here: http://blog.keia.org/2019/10/impeachment-precedent-lessons-nixon-clinton-administrations/

    • 17 min
    A Team of Their Own: Seth Berkman

    A Team of Their Own: Seth Berkman

    While it is frustrating to see North Korean projectiles flying out to sea and Pyongyang’s erratic, unpredictable reactions in negotiations, we cannot forget where things stood in 2017 - the days of Fire and Fury. The exchange of rhetoric between the United States and North Korea appeared to be pushing both sides towards a confrontation. Then a shift happened just as quickly as the escalation - especially after North Korea’s showed interest in jointly participating in the Olympics with South Korea at Pyeongchang in early 2018. 
    At the heart of this joint participation in the Olympics was the ice hockey team that was formed with athletes representing both North and South Korea - these are events that you might be already familiar with, but a lot was happening at Pyeongchang, both at a geopolitical level and at a human level. 
    The unified Korea team was more than just a story of North-South reconciliation. The team was pan-Korean with players of Korean descent from Canada and the United States skating side-by-side.  
    Seth Berkman is the author of the first book on this unique event. His new book "A Team of Their Own: How an International Sisterhood Made Olympic History" is now available wherever good books are sold. 

    • 29 min
    The Korean Revolutionary in Cuba: Joseph Juhn

    The Korean Revolutionary in Cuba: Joseph Juhn

    What does it mean to be Korean?
    Is a person's Korean identity contingent on their birth on the Korean Peninsula, their parents’ ethnicity, or their ability to speak Korean? 
    100 years ago - this was an easier question to answer - a person self-identifying as Korean was likely born on the Korean Peninsula, to two ethnic Korean parents, and spoke Korean.
    But the complexity of Korean identity in the 21st century parallels the turbulence of Korea’s history in the 20th century: displacement of caused by Japanese colonialism, Stalin’s deportation of ethnic Koreans to Central Asia, Zainichi Koreans left in limbo after the second world war in Japan, and the migration of Koreans to the Americas in search of new opportunities.  
    Now there is a vast Korean diaspora around the world - and also a new multi-cultural Korean community in the Korean Peninsula.
    Our guest Joseph Juhn spent the last 3 years developing a documentary about one particular group: the Korean Cubans. His project focuses on the life of one Korean-Cuban in particular - Jeronimo Lim who fought alongside Fidel Castro and Che Guevara in the 1958 Revolution. "Jeronimo: An Untold Tale of Koreans in Cuba" premiers in South Korea on November 21, 2019. 

    • 22 min

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chaeeunn1 ,

It is really good channel

I am Korean and also ESL student in Canada. I recommend this channel for ESl student, especially Korean because it is easy to understand what they are saying in audio based on our basic knowledge about What’s going on Korea recently

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