239 episodes

Join neuroscientist, philosopher, and best-selling author Sam Harris as he explores important and controversial questions about the human mind, society, and current events.

Sam Harris is the author of five New York Times bestsellers. His books include The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, The Moral Landscape, Free Will, Lying, Waking Up, and Islam and the Future of Tolerance (with Maajid Nawaz). The End of Faith won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. His writing and public lectures cover a wide range of topics—neuroscience, moral philosophy, religion, meditation practice, human violence, rationality—but generally focus on how a growing understanding of ourselves and the world is changing our sense of how we should live.

Harris's work has been published in more than 20 languages and has been discussed in The New York Times, Time, Scientific American, Nature, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, and many other journals. He has written for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Economist, The Times (London), The Boston Globe, The Atlantic, The Annals of Neurology, and elsewhere.

Sam Harris received a degree in philosophy from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from UCLA.

Making Sense with Sam Harris Sam Harris

    • Science
    • 4.7 • 3.8K Ratings

Join neuroscientist, philosopher, and best-selling author Sam Harris as he explores important and controversial questions about the human mind, society, and current events.

Sam Harris is the author of five New York Times bestsellers. His books include The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, The Moral Landscape, Free Will, Lying, Waking Up, and Islam and the Future of Tolerance (with Maajid Nawaz). The End of Faith won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. His writing and public lectures cover a wide range of topics—neuroscience, moral philosophy, religion, meditation practice, human violence, rationality—but generally focus on how a growing understanding of ourselves and the world is changing our sense of how we should live.

Harris's work has been published in more than 20 languages and has been discussed in The New York Times, Time, Scientific American, Nature, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, and many other journals. He has written for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Economist, The Times (London), The Boston Globe, The Atlantic, The Annals of Neurology, and elsewhere.

Sam Harris received a degree in philosophy from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from UCLA.

    #232 — Inequality and Revolution

    #232 — Inequality and Revolution

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Jack Goldstone about the rise in social inequality and political instability in the United States. They discuss how wealth is deployed, the loss of social mobility, comparative judgments of well-being, cosmopolitanism and the isolation of the rich, decreased life expectancy, taxation, the need for government to solve problems, success and social obligation, the causes of revolution, universal basic income (UBI), and other topics.
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    • 41 min
    #231 — Crossing the Abyss

    #231 — Crossing the Abyss

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with General Stanley McChrystal and Chris Fussell about the radicalization of the far Right under Trump. They discuss the events of January 6, 2021, the behavior of the Capitol police, the history of white supremacy in the US, the effect of banning extremists from social media, the logic of insurgency, the consequence of public lies, what should happen to Trump and his enablers, and other topics.
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    • 1 hr 14 min
    #230 — An Insurrection of Lies

    #230 — An Insurrection of Lies

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris discusses two dangerous misconceptions about the siege of the Capitol.
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    • 41 min
    #229 — A Few Thoughts for a New Year

    #229 — A Few Thoughts for a New Year

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris analyzes a few disturbing trends and shares his hopes for 2021.
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    • 29 min
    #228 — Doing Good

    #228 — Doing Good

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Will MacAskill about how to do the most good in the world. They discuss the "effective altruism" movement, choosing causes to support, the apparent tension between wealth and altruism, how best to think about generosity over the course of one's lifetime, and other topics.
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    • 2 hrs 14 min
    #227 — Knowing the Mind

    #227 — Knowing the Mind

    In this episode of the podcast, Stephen Laureys interviews Sam Harris about meditation practice and the scientific study of the mind. They discuss why Sam began to practice meditation, the difference between dualistic and nondualistic mindfulness, the search for happiness, wisdom vs knowledge, our relationship with death, the Buddhist doctrine of rebirth, the hard problem of consciousness, the role of introspection in science, meditation and free will, the self and the brain, the difference between voluntary and involuntary actions, dangerous knowledge, the mystery of being, the power of hypnosis, and other topics.
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    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
3.8K Ratings

3.8K Ratings

Jennypeasoup ,

An Insurrection of Lies

Perfectly placed profanity. Probably my most favourite episode of the podcast that had me laughing out loud in my car by myself. This is a great start to 2021 Sam, please don’t change a thing.

jyazer ,

Capitol and race

The idea that the level and force of policing would have been no different had it been a BLM protest storming the Capitol is not a good one. Sam uses the counterfactual of white antifa protesters and suggests the policing would’ve been more intense. But it’s fairly obvious that both can be true: that policing would’ve been more intense against both white antifa and black/racially diverse BLM protesters based on police antipathy or a set of assumptions about violence likely to result (or on the flip side empathy for the Trump mob evidenced by cops taking selfies etc). I understand that police at many/most BLM protests showed restraint, but there have also been a huge real number of reported incidents of police violence, kettling, etc., and I’m not sure why Sam is quite so resistant to the possibility of race playing a factor in police prep and response.

Borough baby ,

Ignorant

No way, man. Like hell you’re going to tell the world the difference between BLM and insurrection is not about race. GOODBYE SAM HARRIS

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