215 épisodes

Join neuroscientist, philosopher, and best-selling author Sam Harris as he explores important and controversial questions about the human mind, society, and current events.

Sam Harris is the author of five New York Times bestsellers. His books include The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, The Moral Landscape, Free Will, Lying, Waking Up, and Islam and the Future of Tolerance (with Maajid Nawaz). The End of Faith won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. His writing and public lectures cover a wide range of topics—neuroscience, moral philosophy, religion, meditation practice, human violence, rationality—but generally focus on how a growing understanding of ourselves and the world is changing our sense of how we should live.

Harris's work has been published in more than 20 languages and has been discussed in The New York Times, Time, Scientific American, Nature, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, and many other journals. He has written for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Economist, The Times (London), The Boston Globe, The Atlantic, The Annals of Neurology, and elsewhere.

Sam Harris received a degree in philosophy from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from UCLA.

Making Sense with Sam Harris Sam Harris

    • Sciences
    • 4.7, 3.6 k notes

Join neuroscientist, philosopher, and best-selling author Sam Harris as he explores important and controversial questions about the human mind, society, and current events.

Sam Harris is the author of five New York Times bestsellers. His books include The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, The Moral Landscape, Free Will, Lying, Waking Up, and Islam and the Future of Tolerance (with Maajid Nawaz). The End of Faith won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. His writing and public lectures cover a wide range of topics—neuroscience, moral philosophy, religion, meditation practice, human violence, rationality—but generally focus on how a growing understanding of ourselves and the world is changing our sense of how we should live.

Harris's work has been published in more than 20 languages and has been discussed in The New York Times, Time, Scientific American, Nature, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, and many other journals. He has written for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Economist, The Times (London), The Boston Globe, The Atlantic, The Annals of Neurology, and elsewhere.

Sam Harris received a degree in philosophy from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from UCLA.

    #209 — A Good Life

    #209 — A Good Life

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Scott Barry Kaufman about human well-being. They discuss intelligence and creativity, wisdom and transcendence, the history of humanistic psychology, Maslow's hierarchy of needs, the connection between well-being and ethics, self-esteem, psychedelics and meditation, peak and plateau experiences, mortality salience, the pre-trans fallacy, fear of uncertainty, work and meaning, intrinsic vs. extrinsic rewards, pathological altruism, intimacy vs. belonging, two aspects of self-transcendence, and other topics.
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    • 57 min
    #208 — Existential Risk

    #208 — Existential Risk

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Toby Ord about preserving the long term future of humanity. They discuss moral biases with respect to distance in space and time, the psychology of effective altruism, feeling good vs doing good, possible blindspots in consequentialism, natural vs human-caused risk, asteroid impacts, nuclear war, pandemics, the potentially cosmic significance of human survival, the difference between bad things and the absence of good things, population ethics, Derek Parfit, the asymmetry between happiness and suffering, climate change, and other topics.
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    • 1h 4 min
    #207 — Can We Pull Back From The Brink?

    #207 — Can We Pull Back From The Brink?

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam discusses the recent social protests and civil unrest, in light of what we know about racism and police violence in America.
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    • 1h 52 min
    #206 — May 26, 2020

    #206 — May 26, 2020

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with David Frum about the shifting political landscape. They discuss the secularization of politics, distrust of the media and other institutions, voter suppression, the 2020 elections, what happens if Trump gets a second term, the role of money in politics, conspiracy theories around Covid-19, the Michael Flynn controversy, the prospect that Trump will refuse to leave office, and other topics.
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    • 44 min
    #205 — The Failure of Meritocracy

    #205 — The Failure of Meritocracy

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Daniel Markovits about the problems with meritocracy. They discuss the nature of inequality in the United States, the disappearance of the leisure class, the difference between labor and capital as sources of inequality, the way the education system amplifies inequality, the shrinking middle class, deaths of despair, differing social norms among the elite and the working class, the ethics of taxation, scales of philanthropy, universal basic income, the need for a wealth tax, the relationship between meritocracy and political polarization, the illusion of earned advantages, and other topics.
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    • 58 min
    #204 — May 18, 2020

    #204 — May 18, 2020

    In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Jonathan Haidt about the maintenance of a healthy society. They discuss the problem of orthodoxy, the history of political polarization in the US, the breakdown of public conversation, remaining uncertainty about Covid-19, motivated reasoning, the 2020 election, the future prospects for Gen Z, the effect of social media on the mental health of girls, Jonathan's experience with psychedelics, positive psychology, loss of self, the experience of awe, and other topics.
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    • 1h 5 min

Avis des utilisateurs

4.7 sur 5
3.6 k notes

3.6 k notes

LJ Lars J ,

Rich, at times provocative, but always rhetorically sound content

Sam Harris slices off a compelling range of bits and bites of the world we live in, from politics to psychology to art and everything in between. In carefully reasoned interviews and commentary, he forges a space of ‘sober second thought’ on many of the destructive forces that push on public discourse. I’m so happy these podcasts exist and while it’s undoubtedly got a lot to do with ‘confirmation bias’ I find myself saying “Right? Right?” an awful lot.

xulofo ,

Great man

Ben Shapiro and his friends should listen and follow you .
Thanks 😊

grace club ,

Super Problematic

Regarding episode Coming Back From The Brink (police brutality protests)... it was difficult to listen to for sure! Mostly, I do not agree with Sam’s tone or arguments, and think he chose statistics that SEEM to be relevant but are actually not the point of BLM movement, or are misleading in general.

I have debated sending it to a few of my trusted black friends for feedback, but I am virtually certain it would be incredibly upsetting for them.

His points are very common “What Aboutisms” which are tactics intended to take away from the points that BLM and other activist based movements have raised.
For instance, black on black crime. And his heavy reliance on murder stats verses harassment or abuse stats (of which would be exhausting and probably impossible to gather as why would anyone report being harassed by the cops TO the cops). Black people shouldn’t have to be murdered by cops to prove that cops abuse their power or that police institutions oppress black communities.
If we live in North America, we live in a white supremacy. We give unilateral power (and weapons) to inherently racist people (everyone) and expect them not to be racist and biased in their use of power and weapons. The point is JUSTICE and accountability for abuse of power.
The BLM movement isn’t trying to divide, it’s trying to bring white folx on board, getting them to SEE and hear the injustice that has been occurring under our noses for centuries. The civil rights movement was peaceful (largely) and here we are more than half a century later STILL not confronting our role in the daily trauma, subjugation, and oppression of black and indigenous folx.
I think that Sam thinks he is helping by trying to calm a very agitated current state. But in general I think his method is more harmful because it’s gaslighting and tone policing, and silencing black voices.

A discussion with a black thought leader/speaker/ someone who is directly affected by Sam’s opinions would have been the way to go. That way said guest would have been able to respond to his claims in real time- and impressionable listeners would have a more balanced platform to learn from.

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