50 épisodes

Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our leading business news radio program and podcast is about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy developments, we help listeners understand the economic world around them. Marketplace makes sense of the economy for everyone, no econ degree or finance background required. Marketplace doesn’t just report on the numbers, we take it deeper, adding context to what’s happening in the stock market and how macroeconomic policy can affect you and your business. Monday through Friday, our team speaks with a wide range of industry professionals– from small business owners to Fortune 500 CEOs, Marketplace breaks down complex topics related to business and the economy without industry jargon and over complicated explanations.

Marketplace American Public Media

    • Actualités
    • 4.7 • 103 notes

Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our leading business news radio program and podcast is about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy developments, we help listeners understand the economic world around them. Marketplace makes sense of the economy for everyone, no econ degree or finance background required. Marketplace doesn’t just report on the numbers, we take it deeper, adding context to what’s happening in the stock market and how macroeconomic policy can affect you and your business. Monday through Friday, our team speaks with a wide range of industry professionals– from small business owners to Fortune 500 CEOs, Marketplace breaks down complex topics related to business and the economy without industry jargon and over complicated explanations.

    States are starting to drop out of federal pandemic unemployment programs

    States are starting to drop out of federal pandemic unemployment programs

    Arkansas, Montana and South Carolina are pulling out of federal unemployment programs related to the pandemic. The Republican governors of the three states are saying the same thing: The benefits are too generous, and they’re preventing people from wanting to go back to work. But the U.S. economy is still down more than 8 million jobs since the pandemic arrived. On today’s show: Why states are pulling out of the programs and what it means for workers. Also: A pipeline hack reveals critical infrastructure vulnerabilities in the U.S., farmers in Texas are still reeling from the February freeze and how COVID-19 might change packaging for good.

    Donations from listeners power our nonprofit news. Your gift will support the journalism that keeps you and thousands of others informed every day. Become a Marketplace Investor: marketplace.org/donate

    • 28 min
    Making sense of a disappointing jobs report

    Making sense of a disappointing jobs report

    Most economists expected something like 1 million new jobs in April. Instead, there were 266,000 added — which isn’t going to make much of a dent in recovering the 8 million jobs we’re still down. The hiring slowdown is happening in an economy that has a lot tilted in its favor, including trillions of dollars in relief for individuals, small businesses and local government. On today’s show, we make sense of April’s jobs numbers and ask what it’s going to take to juice the jobs market. Plus: why the Federal Reserve is pointing to risks in the current economy; how restaurants in Texas are finding it hard to attract staff; and a look at the water crisis in a rural Maryland community.

    Now, this is a good investment: Give $5 a month or more to support Marketplace’s public service journalism and get (almost) any thank-you gift: marketplace.org/donate

    • 28 min
    What’s driving the labor shortage?

    What’s driving the labor shortage?

    We got some signs that the job market is improving: Initial claims for state unemployment benefits last week fell under half a million for the first time since the pandemic began. Continuing claims also fell sharply. But employers and trade groups are increasingly saying they can’t find workers to hire. On today’s show: Why this labor shortage is unusual. Also, the Biden administration is backing a temporary waiver on COVID-19 vaccine patents, what a flexible work future looks like, and why QR codes are the future of hospitality.

    Now this is a good investment: Give $5 a month or more to support Marketplace’s public service journalism and get (almost) any thank you gift: marketplace.org/donate

    • 28 min
    Who has leverage in the labor market?

    Who has leverage in the labor market?

    Friday’s jobs report marks one year since the release of one of the worst jobs reports in U.S. history; the economy had lost 20 million jobs in a single month. One year later, there are still millions of people unemployed, but data from payroll processors and online job search sites point to continuing job growth. Chris Hyams, CEO of Indeed, joined “Marketplace” host Kai Ryssdal to talk about how the labor market is recovering from the pandemic. Also on today’s show: Small businesses that closed at the beginning of the pandemic may never reopen, a new report warns that critical minerals for green energy might become scarce, and the European Union is raising the drawbridge on companies that get foreign subsidies.

    Now this is a good investment: Give $5 a month or more to support Marketplace’s public service journalism and get (almost) any thank you gift: marketplace.org/donate

     

    • 28 min
    “I think I really began to question what is living”

    “I think I really began to question what is living”

    The pandemic prompted a lot of people to think about their values and identities, and that includes what they do for a living. According to Prudential’s Pulse of the American Worker Survey, 1 in 5 workers changed their line of work over the last year. On today’s show: a look at the many Americans drastically changing their career paths. Plus, manufacturers are having difficulty filling job vacancies, rental car companies are having difficulty finding used cars, and church real estate is up.

    • 27 min
    The low-hanging fruit on Biden’s climate agenda

    The low-hanging fruit on Biden’s climate agenda

    President Joe Biden has made dealing with climate change a top priority of his administration. While Congress and the White House hammer out the way that shows up in the big infrastructure package, there are relatively easy fixes that have bipartisan support. For example, phasing out the use of hydrofluorocarbons. HFCs are chemical refrigerants found in products we use every day — that do a lot of damage to the climate. Also on today’s show: More homeowners are paying their mortgage bills again, Verizon is selling Yahoo and AOL for $5 billion and how “green hydrogen” could be used to produce energy and steel with zero emissions.

    • 27 min

Avis des utilisateurs

4.7 sur 5
103 notes

103 notes

Brett 4567 ,

Love it, but hate the music.

I love the podcast along with Kai’s other podcasts with molly. I just wish the music could be modernized? Just a thought

bf2019 ,

Kai

Good info on this pod but time ro replace Kai

Matt7954 ,

Great podcast

I am a postgrad economics student, I find this podcast very valuable

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