255 episodes

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs Rick Harp

    • News
    • 4.7 • 232 Ratings

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

    "Canada’s Carbon Economy & Indigenous Ambivalence"

    "Canada’s Carbon Economy & Indigenous Ambivalence"

    DILEMMA INDIGENA: For Indigenous peoples living under settler colonialism today, there are few choices that aren’t constrained, a predicament at the heart of a discussion in the brand new book, Regime of Obstruction: How Corporate Power Blocks Energy Democracy.
    Just published by Athabasca University Press, its 30-plus contributors include this week’s special guest, Clifford Atleo, an Assistant Professor of Resource & Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University, who joins us to discuss his chapter, “Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Canada’s Carbon Economy and Indigenous Ambivalence.”
    // CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Left in the Lurch by Laurentian U

    Left in the Lurch by Laurentian U

    Northern education rooted in the north: for many, it's a vision at the very heart of Laurentian University, a northern Ontario school that today is in turmoil. Administrators now pursuing a dramatic—some say draconian—process of retrenchment and austerity, cutting dozens of programs and positions.
    Seen as a tricultural hub serving the region’s English, French and Indigenous populations, the institution has not only shared a campus with the University of Sudbury (among others), it’s shared funding. Now that too will end. Putting the fate of the U of S Indigenous Studies program—among Canada’s oldest—up in the air. But as some try to make sense of all the slashing, critics allege the process remains shrouded in secrecy. Prompting some to wonder whether larger agendas and larger forces may be at play.
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are MI regular Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, as well as special guest Celeste Pedri-Spade, an Associate Professor and Queen's National Scholar in Indigenous Studies at Queen’s University.
    // CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic. SFX: “ding” by tim.kahn (CC BY 3.0)

    • 59 min
    An Outpouring of Outrage, pt 2

    An Outpouring of Outrage, pt 2

    It’s the second half of our conversation with artist Chief Lady Bird about her decision to design a beer can label in support of Indigenous women’s causes. In part one, we learned about how it all came to be and some of the reaction that’s poured forth in its wake. This time, we go deeper into popular misunderstandings and misrepresentations of drugs and addiction, drawing on the insights of a neuroscientist who not only studies drugs but unapologetically enjoys them too.
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp for even more social lubrication are Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC, and our special guest, artist Okimaa Kwe Bihness, also known as Chief Lady Bird.
    // CREDITS: “Tree Tenants,” by Revolution Void (CC BY 3.0). Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Opening up a can of controversy: Pt. 1 (ep 252)

    Opening up a can of controversy: Pt. 1 (ep 252)

    It was meant as a gesture in support of Indigenous women. A one of a kind design by an Indigenous artist known for her bold, provocative imagery. But when it comes to her latest work, it’s not what her art shows that’s sparked strife so much as where it’s shown—wrapped around a cold can of beer. Cue the beer can backlash, with some slamming the artist for supposedly glorifying or at least trivializing a substance many blame for violence against and among Indigenous people. This week, the first half of an extended conversation with Chippewa/Potawatomi artist Chief Lady Bird to learn more about the origins of her collaboration with the brewery, the outrage it tapped into, and why this topic can be so touchy to talk about—for us included.
    Also joining host/producer Rick Harp: MI regulars Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.
    // CREDITS: Our theme is ‘nesting’ by birocratic.

    • 52 min
    When rez dogs become settlers' pet projects

    When rez dogs become settlers' pet projects

    Canine colonial. Is it apt to draw parallels between the worst ills of mainstream child welfare systems and those of animal welfare? It’s the potentially provocative thesis of the Vancouver Humane Society, a thesis they soon hope to put into practice.
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp for a decolonial discussion on dogs on and off the rez are MI regulars Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment.
    // CREDITS: Episode edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 44 min
    Conservative Convention & Indigenous Interests

    Conservative Convention & Indigenous Interests

    They’re one of Canada’s oldest political parties. Heck, they gave the country its first ever prime minister back in 1867. Today, the Conservative Party of Canada hopes to form the next federal government. They may get their chance: rumours of a summer election abound.
    Making the party’s recent policy convention—and the associated keynote speech of leader Erin O’Toole—possible windows into what another Conservative government might hold in store for Indigenous interests. Joining host/producer Rick Harp to parse the party's policies and pronouncements are Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.
    CREDITS: “Disco High” by UltraCat (CC BY 3.0)

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
232 Ratings

232 Ratings

waawaate ,

Great podcast

Overall, the podcast is excellent. I learn a lot every time I listen. Panelists bring key perspectives. Especially Kim and Candis with their STS lenses.

One area that the podcast could grow is including more voices from outside academics. The episode with CLB was great because it was important to hear someone from outside the academy on an issue they are really involved in. The podcast could look to more often include more diverse knowledge holders.

1010101010101010 ,

My favourite way to get my news

These insightful takes from both Rick harpe and the brilliant panelists help me to understand what is happening in so called Canada

Kawasakininjas ,

Grounding

Grounding. Relevant. Needed. Thank you
Thank you nia:wen kowa for your efforts, these discussions, for your intention and your care.

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