306 episodes

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs Rick Harp

    • News
    • 4.7 • 287 Ratings

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

    Why mandatory English testing for some Indigenous nurses "smells like white supremacy"

    Why mandatory English testing for some Indigenous nurses "smells like white supremacy"

    On our first MINI INDIGENA of the season, host/producer Rick Harp and MI regular Trina Roache (Rogers Chair in Journalism at the University of King’s College) are joined by special guest Melissa Ridgen (former co-anchor of APTN National News, now a network managing editor at Global News), as they discuss:
    • The Siksika First Nation to create reportedly first-ever First Nation bylaw prosecutor's office in Canada
    • Trina’s RT of the @APTNNews post: “NDP MP Leah Gazan [successfully] reintroduced a motion to recognize what happened in Canada’s residential school system as an act of genocide…”
    • Rick’s RT of the @TorontoStar post: “Loblaw made $1 million per day in ‘excess’ profits in 2022, according to a new report analyzing rising prices in the grocery industry.”
    • Why a Northern Manitoba health leader says English language test a barrier to Indigenous nurses that “smells like white supremacy”
    >> CREDITS: “Apoplēssein” by Wax Lyricist; “Sing Along with Jim,” by Kevin MacLeod (CC-BY 3.0); “arborescence_ex-vitro” by Koi-discovery. SFX: 'Boing' by InspectorJ.

    • 35 min
    TalkBack: Mary-Ellen Turpel-Lafond

    TalkBack: Mary-Ellen Turpel-Lafond

    Introducing our first-ever 'TalkBack' edition of MEDIA INDIGENA, where monthly supporters of the podcast on Patreon get the chance to share their feedback about our most recent deep dive directly with our roundtablers.
    This week, we debrief about last week's conversation, “The unravelling story of Mary Ellen Turpel Lafond.” She's the high-profile figure in B.C. whose long-standing claims to biological Indigeneity were seriously undermined by a recent CBC News investigation.
    Returning for this TalkBack episode, MI regulars Kim TallBear (professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) and Candis Callison (Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC), recorded live inside our brand-new Discord on Friday, October 28.
    // CREDITS: “Guitarista” by Mr Smith (CC BY 4.0); “Free Guitar Walking Blues (F 015)” by Lobo Loco (CC BY-SA 4.0)

    • 51 min
    The unravelling story of Mary-Ellen Turpel-Lafond

    The unravelling story of Mary-Ellen Turpel-Lafond

    This week: another one bites the dust? Who is the real Mary-Ellen Turpel-Lafond? A question very much on the minds of Indigenous people in Canada these days, still digesting the exhaustive and explosive CBC News investigation into her public and private life—not least, her repeated claims to being a treaty Indian as a daughter of a Cree man from a northern First Nation in Manitoba. A man the CBC could only verify as the B.C.-born settler son of settler parents of Euro-American ancestry.
    Just some of the troubling discrepancies documented by an exposé that’s thrown virtually everything about Turpel-Lafond’s life story into question. A narrative that, ‘til now, presented her rapid rise to influence as a remarkable journey against the odds. One the CBC seems to show goes largely against the facts.
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp to take a deep dive into what’s apparently only one of many such scandals of late, MI roundtable regulars Kim TallBear (professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience and Society, and Candis Callison (Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC).
    // CREDITS: Our intro/extro theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 15 min
    Settler Election Fever

    Settler Election Fever

    On our last Summer '22 episode of collected, connected conversations: settler election fever! In this back half of our political retrospective on Election 2019 and more, we revisit the 2019 campaign's first debate, an infamous campaign scrum, and whether the real solution to our political woes might be an all-Indigenous party.
     
    Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

    • Hayden King, Executive Director of the Yellowhead Institute based at Toronto Metropolitan University

    • Vanessa Watts, Yellowhead fellow and Assistant Professor of Indigenous Studies and Sociology at McMaster University

    • Kim TallBear, Professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience and Society

    • Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC

    • Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University

    • Ken Williams, Assistant Professor with the University of Alberta's Department of Drama

    • Wawmeesh Hamilton, journalist and photographer
    // CREDITS: Creative Commons music this episode includes “La Citadelle” and “The Tablets” by Komiku, “Trouvée dans la traduction” by Alpha Hydrae, “The Call of the Coyote” by Monplaisir, “High on Loungin’” by Wax Lyricist, and “La maison rose-soleil” by Cuicuitte, and “One Time Last Time” by Soft and Furious. Our opening theme is “Bad Nostalgia (Instrumental)” by Anthem of Rain. This episode was hosted/produced/edited by Rick Harp; production assistance by Courteney Morin.

    • 1 hr
    Neech the Vote

    Neech the Vote

    In this set of collected, connected conversations (the penultimate episode in our Summer '22 series): Neech the Vote! Was it really a year ago that Canada held its last federal election? A contest we didn’t much concern ourselves with, to be frank; after all, we’d gone hard on the election two years prior. But, looking back, maybe that 2019 campaign taught us all we needed to know about how Indigenous interests fare in such settler exercises.
     
    Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

    • Hayden King, Executive Director of the Yellowhead Institute based at Toronto Metropolitan University

    • Vanessa Watts, Yellowhead fellow and Assistant Professor of Indigenous Studies and Sociology at McMaster University

    • Kim TallBear, Professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience and Society

    • Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University

    • Ken Williams, Assistant Professor with the University of Alberta's Department of Drama

    • Therese Mailhot, author and Assistant Professor of English at Purdue University

    • Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC

     // CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes “really beautiful my mambo” and “Regate” by Jean Toba, “Treasure finding,” “Love Planet,” and “Night in a Seashell” by Komiku, “Rien n'a vraiment changé” by Demoiselle Döner, and “Respect” by Alpha Hydrae. Our opening theme is “Bad Nostalgia (Instrumental)” by Anthem of Rain; our closing theme is “Garden Tiger” by Pictures of the Floating World. This episode was hosted/produced/edited by Rick Harp; production assistance by Courteney Morin.

    • 1 hr 15 min
    A Seminar in Settlerology

    A Seminar in Settlerology

    On this week's collected, connected conversations (the sixth in our Summer '22 series): Settlerology. That’s right: our chance to turn that gaze around, to peer deep into the soul of settler society! Heck, who better to lead a course on colonial culture than Indigenous people?
     
    Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance):

    • Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University

    • Christohper Powell, Associate Professor of Sociology at Toronto Metropolitan University

    • Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC

    • Kim TallBear, Professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience and Society
    // CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes “Little Green (Alt Take)” by Wax Lyricist and “Mr Paillettes Theme” by Komiku. Our opening theme is “Bad Nostalgia (Instrumental)” by Anthem of Rain; our closing theme is “Garden Tiger” by Pictures of the Floating World. This episode was hosted/produced/edited by Rick Harp; production assistance by Courteney Morin.

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
287 Ratings

287 Ratings

MegzzLovesMusic ,

Very nice

I’m enjoying this podcast! 🥰

JaimeJiggs ,

272 Unhealthy Healers

This was a timely episode as always. It made me think about just doing what we do without worrying about the mainstream about having “dirt” on us. We are now set up to understand why this dysfunction happens. We should deal with this in a way that works for us as Indigenous people. Abuser’s communities should claim their abusers and take responsibility for justice and reform - but it should be victim centred. We shouldn’t be tolerant of abusers and more supportive, guilt free help for the abused.

I think that the mainstream can learn from us in how we deal with victims and abusers. The way colonizers they deal with it doesn’t work.

Kaylia'sMacPro ,

Favourite podcast!

This is my favourite podcast. It’s so informative and well organized which makes it a pleasure to listen too even when addressing difficult and complex topics. I recommend this podcast to every fellow settler I know!

Top Podcasts In News

Rachel Maddow, MSNBC
The New York Times
CBC Podcasts
BBC World Service
The Economist
NPR

You Might Also Like

CBC Radio
Sandy Hudson & Nora Loreto
CANADALAND
CANADALAND
The Red Nation
CANADALAND