275 episodes

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs Rick Harp

    • News
    • 4.7 • 259 Ratings

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

    Wet’suwet’en Solidarity

    Wet’suwet’en Solidarity

    As long-time listeners know well, this isn’t the first time our podcast has looked at long-standing Wet’suwet’en efforts to block outside incursions into their territory. Indeed, last August’s double episode, 'Resource Resistance,' situated their struggle at its core. This time ‘round, we invite on a new perspective regarding recent events on the ground as well as the bigger political and economic picture.
    A lawyer from the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, Kris Statnyk works exclusively with Indigenous peoples, practicing in the area of Aboriginal law. He shares his thoughts on this latest paramilitary raid on Wet’suweten land protectors—the RCMP's third in roughly three years—as well as his eyewitness account of solidarity actions in neighbouring Gitxsan territory.
    // CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 52 min
    When even an Indian Affairs minister says 'Land Back', can we still use it?

    When even an Indian Affairs minister says 'Land Back', can we still use it?

    Our second crack at a “rapid round” of shorter conversations on multiple topics recorded via Clubhouse includes discussions on... whether '#LandBack' has been drained of its radical potential after an Indian Affairs minister's apparently unironic use of the term; how some people "Indian Up" their appearance for non-Indigenous audiences; and the retreat of Alton Gas from its Shubenacadie River project.
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp are Kim TallBear (professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) and Trina Roache (Rogers Chair in Journalism at the University of King’s College).
    >> CREDITS: 'Microship' by CavalloPazzo (CC BY-SA 4.0) 

    • 26 min
    Unsettled Settlers

    Unsettled Settlers

    When it comes to advancing Indigenous causes, is making settlers 'feel bad' a winning strategy? At least one settler pundit says 'no,' and he’s rounded up some Indigenous people who seem to agree with him.
    At issue: the apparent cultural war on Thanksgiving, where bad attitudes toward the cherished holiday have spilled across the U.S./Canada border like so much rancid gravy. And as the time of year nears for Americans to feel supremely thankful, leave it to some Indian ingrates to try and spoil the party!
    Or at least, so says one Postmedia columnist with an axe to grind and a column to fill. In a moment, we’ll subject this settler polemic to some good ol' fashioned line-by-line media critique, carving it open like an overcooked turkey with no thanks given.
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the 'table this week are regulars Kim TallBear (professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment) and Trina Roache (Rogers Chair in Journalism at the University of King’s College).
    // CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Unhealthy Healers

    Unhealthy Healers

    CBC News has recently reported that a number of women have come forward with allegations of sexual assault against an Ontario medicine man. Although allegations are not the same as charges or convictions, the stories the women have shared are reminiscent of an all-too-familiar scenario: the kind of stories we’ve all heard whispered about certain healers, spiritualists or elders—individuals you ought not be alone with. Needless to say, it’s a perverse inversion of the roles and responsibilities such healers are supposed to embody and exemplify. The real question is how do they persist? How, despite the open secret of such misconduct, is it all too often met with silence?
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp to try to speak to those questions and more, plus hopefully nudge the conversation forward about what prevention might look like, are roundtable regulars Brock Pitawanakwat (Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University) and Ken Williams (assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama).
    // CREDITS: Our opening/closing theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 45 min
    Canada's provincial patchwork of Orange Shirt Days (ep 271)

    Canada's provincial patchwork of Orange Shirt Days (ep 271)

    On our first-ever “rapid round” of shorter conversations on multiple topics (recorded via the social audio app Clubhouse), we discuss: provinces that won't make Orange Shirt Day a holiday; the stripping of a residential school advocate’s name from various Edmonton locations; and what happens on Twitter when an Israel state official tweets in support of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Day.
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp on this inaugural audio experiment: Ken Williams (assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama) and Kim TallBear (professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta)
    >> CREDITS: 'Microship' by CavalloPazzo (CC BY-SA 4.0) 

    • 24 min
    An anti-carbon coup for Indigenous climate activists

    An anti-carbon coup for Indigenous climate activists

    Carbon coup. When it comes to fighting climate change, have Indigenous activists made much of a difference? Do we really know what their myriad anti-pipeline actions add up to? Turns out, a lot—now with the numbers to back it up. They come from a recent report that’s literally quantified the amount of greenhouse gas emissions either stopped or delayed thanks to Indigenous-led activism. But will this more concrete sense of the impact of Indigenous leadership translate into greater respect and recognition?
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this episode are Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University Brock Pitawanakwat, and Rogers Chair in Journalism at the University of King’s College Trina Roache.
    // CREDITS: Our opening and closing theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
259 Ratings

259 Ratings

JaimeJiggs ,

272 Unhealthy Healers

This was a timely episode as always. It made me think about just doing what we do without worrying about the mainstream about having “dirt” on us. We are now set up to understand why this dysfunction happens. We should deal with this in a way that works for us as Indigenous people. Abuser’s communities should claim their abusers and take responsibility for justice and reform - but it should be victim centred. We shouldn’t be tolerant of abusers and more supportive, guilt free help for the abused.

I think that the mainstream can learn from us in how we deal with victims and abusers. The way colonizers they deal with it doesn’t work.

Kaylia'sMacPro ,

Favourite podcast!

This is my favourite podcast. It’s so informative and well organized which makes it a pleasure to listen too even when addressing difficult and complex topics. I recommend this podcast to every fellow settler I know!

sandycats ,

Excellent!

Extremely informative, in-depth analysis of all things Indigenous in the Canadian and broader context, all with a flavourful dash of humour.

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