222 episodes

Podcast host and author David Andrew Wiebe is known for his calm and level-headed delivery of instructional podcast content for independent musicians and music business owners. After a six-month hiatus from his previous show, DAWCast: Music Entrepreneurship, and some thoughtful deliberation, he rebranded and relaunched. The New Music Industry Podcast isn’t just a simple and easily understood show name – it is also the title of his latest highly-praised book – The New Music Industry: Adapting, Growing, and Thriving in The Information Age – featuring personal development and business advice and a comprehensive view of modern marketing strategies – social media, blogging, podcasting, video, live performance, radio, and more. Listeners can expect to hear interviews with a wide range of people – not just musicians, experts and industry people, but also marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners that can bring a much-needed valuable perspective to the discussion. Wiebe has already had the likes of Bob Baker, James Moore, Ross Barber, Helen Austin, Eddie Meehan, Christopher Sutton, DeCarlos Garrison, Ian Temple, Melina Krumova, James Schramko, Brian Poillucci, Andrew Galucki, Deborah Fairchild, Jason Davis, Sean Murphy, Kevin Breuner, Jules Schroeder, Dobbs Franks, Johnny Vieira, Vik Rajan, Richard "Younglord" Frierson, Monica Strut, Brent Vaartstra, Matt Starr and many others.

The New Music Industry Podcast | MusicEntrepreneurHQ.com | with David Andrew Wiebe David Andrew Wiebe

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Podcast host and author David Andrew Wiebe is known for his calm and level-headed delivery of instructional podcast content for independent musicians and music business owners. After a six-month hiatus from his previous show, DAWCast: Music Entrepreneurship, and some thoughtful deliberation, he rebranded and relaunched. The New Music Industry Podcast isn’t just a simple and easily understood show name – it is also the title of his latest highly-praised book – The New Music Industry: Adapting, Growing, and Thriving in The Information Age – featuring personal development and business advice and a comprehensive view of modern marketing strategies – social media, blogging, podcasting, video, live performance, radio, and more. Listeners can expect to hear interviews with a wide range of people – not just musicians, experts and industry people, but also marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners that can bring a much-needed valuable perspective to the discussion. Wiebe has already had the likes of Bob Baker, James Moore, Ross Barber, Helen Austin, Eddie Meehan, Christopher Sutton, DeCarlos Garrison, Ian Temple, Melina Krumova, James Schramko, Brian Poillucci, Andrew Galucki, Deborah Fairchild, Jason Davis, Sean Murphy, Kevin Breuner, Jules Schroeder, Dobbs Franks, Johnny Vieira, Vik Rajan, Richard "Younglord" Frierson, Monica Strut, Brent Vaartstra, Matt Starr and many others.

    221 – Stay Encouraged, Stay Inspired

    221 – Stay Encouraged, Stay Inspired

    Things have been kind of interesting as of late. But that doesn’t mean you should feel down and like it’s all coming to an end.

    If you’re feeling discouraged or unmotivated right now, have a listen to this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast to get pumped up!

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:17 – David’s purpose

    * 01:57 – Interrupting the current series

    * 02:50 – There has never been a better time to express yourself creatively

    * 03:59 – Don’t be a lone wolf

    * 04:56 – Concluding thoughts



    Transcription:

    Coming soon.

    • 6 min
    220 – What to do with Your Music in 2021 Part 2

    220 – What to do with Your Music in 2021 Part 2

    Tools aren’t everything when it comes to growing your music career. But if you aren’t aware of the opportunities available, you are almost certainly missing out.

    In this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast, we look at what more you can do with your music in 2021.

    Download the PDF transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:29 – Tools to use to promote and share your music in 2021

    * 00:48 – Web hosting: SiteGround

    * 01:17 – Sharing: Songwhip

    * 01:47 – Social network: Drooble

    * 02:28 – Live streaming: StreamYard

    * 02:50 – Influencer marketing: TribeFluence

    * 03:22 – Audience insights: SparkToro

    * 04:11 – Multimedia distribution: Repurpose

    * 04:42 – Old standbys

    * 05:05 – Episode summary



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    And we’re ready to pick up where we left off with part 1 of this series on what to do with your music in 2021.

    In part 1, I covered some high-level mindset and strategic things, and in this episode, I focus on tools. And I can almost guarantee there are some you haven’t even heard of and will appreciate big time.

    So, let’s dive right in.

    1. SiteGround

    In the last episode, I talked about setting up your WordPress site but didn’t even mention where to go to do that.

    My top recommendation is SiteGround. Their hosting is affordable and easy to use, their customer support is great, and sites on their servers load fast.

    So, if this is the direction you’d like to go in, head on over to MusicEntrepreneurHQ.com/SiteGround. We are an affiliate of SiteGround, and if you purchase anything through our link, we may earn a small commission at no additional cost to you.

    2. Songwhip

    You can share your music, or you can share your music with Songwhip. I’d recommend getting acquainted with Songwhip.

    Using this free app, you can easily create music links to every platform, be it Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube, Amazon, or otherwise.

    This comes in especially handy when you don’t know which platforms your fans like to use, or when you want to make sure the recipient can find your music on all platforms.

    Check out Songwhip at Songwhip.com. Learn it. Use it. Benefit from it.

    3. Drooble

    Drooble is a social network that’s been developed specifically with musicians in mind.

    Let’s face it – now that we’re stuck inside, it’s never been more crucial to get connected and to collaborate, so it would be worth signing up for this reason alone.

    But Drooble has also got some amazing features in the form of song reviews, EPKs, radio broadcast, and more. I’ve checked out some of these tools, and they’re great.

    Even if you’ve already got an EPK or electronic press kit, who cares? Set up another one with Drooble and A/B test it alongside your other EPK.

    If you’d like to learn more about Drooble, you can have a listen to episode 82 of the podcast with Melina Krumova.

    4. StreamYard

    There are many tools you can use to stream your live shows or Q&A sessions. My favorite is StreamYard.

    With StreamYard, you can stream to Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube,

    • 7 min
    219 – What to do with Your Music in 2021 Part 1

    219 – What to do with Your Music in 2021 Part 1

    2021 is here. Are you ready to crush it? Are you aware of all the opportunities available?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Download the PDF transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:26 – David’s new Twitter thread

    * 00:59 – No live music in 2021?

    * 01:29 – No more holding back

    * 02:41 – Get into the publishing habit

    * 04:30 – Grow your online presence

    * 06:06 – Episode summary

    * 06:46 – Closing thoughts



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    Happy New Year!

    So, I wanted to get into what to do with your music in 2021. I even posted a thread on Twitter detailing some of my thoughts on this.

    I had 13 some odd points in that thread, and the truth is, I probably have more to share.

    So, I thought I would break this up into a multi-part series. That way, you can listen to each episode and action a few steps before you listen to the next in the series.

    I’ve got at least a dozen tips, probably more. So, this will likely be a four- to five-part series. We’ll see how it comes together.

    But let’s get into this because there’s a lot to cover.

    Preface

    I wanted to preface all this by saying that, while I don’t have a crystal ball, I’m starting to get the sense that live music may not be making much of a return in 2021.

    Now, anything can happen. So, I’m not writing off the possibility that things will get better soon.

    Trust me when I say I miss live music as much as you do right now. I would love just to go to a concert, never mind playing my own.

    But we’ve also got to be realistic. Which is why I’ve identified multiple things you can do with your music this year, even if you’re stuck inside.

    1. Don’t Hold Back

    My number one tip for music makers in 2021 is to stop holding back.

    If there’s something you’ve always wanted to say with your music, but have never gotten around to saying, now’s the time to bring your ideas to life.

    Whether it’s declaring love, protesting current events, sharing your innermost beliefs with your fans, whatever you feel you need to say, get it off your chest as soon as possible.

    Just pretend like you’re on borrowed time and you’ll be in the right spirit.

    Also, don’t hold back in your marketing, networking, outreach, or any other area of your career.

    Sometimes it’s easy to forget just how amazing we all have it here in the digital age. You can interact with high level executives on Twitter. You can read the stories of successful musicians on blogs. You can take advantage of the latest apps and tools to share your music.

    Now’s the time to get back in the game and leverage all the connections, resources, and tools at your fingertips.

    Don’t cower in fear. Don’t bury your head in the sand. Don’t give up on your dreams.

    Get up, get going, and don’t hold back!

    For more inspiration in this regard, have a listen to:



    * Episode 73 of the podcast with DeCarlos Garrison

    * Episode 108 with Jules Schroeder

    * Episode 122 with Richard “Younglord” Frierson

    * Episode 1...

    • 8 min
    218 – Unfamiliar vs. Uncomfortable

    218 – Unfamiliar vs. Uncomfortable

    A significant part of building a music career is facing things that are outside of your comfort zone. So, how can you keep rising to new levels without losing momentum?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.



    Download the PDF transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:30 – A new distinction

    * 00:47 – What is unfamiliar? What is uncomfortable?

    * 01:10 – How to think about unfamiliar

    * 03:55 – How to think about uncomfortable

    * 05:50 – Episode summary

    * 07:03 – Thoughts on today’s episode?

    * 07:24 – Final thoughts



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    I recently stumbled on a distinction I wanted to share with you. I think it will prove beneficial in your creative efforts.

    Today, we’re going to be looking at the difference between “unfamiliar” and “uncomfortable.” And while the difference might seem subtle, it’s critical if you want to perform at your highest level.

    The Difference Between “Unfamiliar” & “Uncomfortable”

    Unfamiliar is when you’re treading into unknown territory.

    Uncomfortable is when you don’t know how to act in a situation.

    You can certainly feel uncomfortable when something is unfamiliar, and you can also feel unfamiliar when something is uncomfortable.

    But when you see that the two don’t need to be collapsed onto each other, you’ll be better equipped to deal with the challenges that arise in your music career.

    Unfamiliar

    When something is unfamiliar, it means you’ve probably never experienced it before. You haven’t been in that situation. So, you don’t know what to expect.

    If you’re trying to get your website set up, but have no idea how to use WordPress, you would be unfamiliar with WordPress.

    It would be strange to say you’re uncomfortable with WordPress at this stage, because you haven’t even used it yet. You know as well as I do that you can become comfortable with anything if you just spend enough time with it.

    When something is unfamiliar, the learning curve seems the steepest. But it’s also where the most learning tends to happen.

    When I was teaching guitar, I always found it amazing how I could take a student from not knowing how to play guitar to teaching them finger exercises, scales, and a few basic songs in a matter of a few lessons. If the student were especially attentive, they could pick all that up in one half-hour lesson!

    So, unfamiliarity is not bad. But you must recognize your human tendency to avoid what’s unfamiliar.

    You may say, “networking is so hard,” when you’ve never attended a networking event. It’s unfamiliar, and until you’re used to introducing yourself, talking about yourself in a compelling away, and listening to others as they share, it’s going to seem daunting.

    Go to enough of these events, and you will get the hang of it. No need to be scared. You’re just unfamiliar. Uncomfortable is when you’ve done it once or twice, and you have a better sense of what to expect, and what you’re expecting is the worst, which is human.

    Procrastination often stems from what’s unfamiliar too. You don’t touch it, because you have no idea how, and you have some strange expectation of yourself that you should already know how.

    When it comes to anything unfamiliar, you need to give yourself some grace. Have no expectations. Make mistakes.

    When I don’t know how to do something the right way, I find tremendous value in making all the mistakes upfront. It helps me avoid those mistakes in the future.

    If you’re messing around with new software, click on everything and see what it does.

    If you’re trying to install new pickups in your guitar,

    • 8 min
    217 – Why Talk About Music?

    217 – Why Talk About Music?

    Is talking about music like dancing around architecture? It is a waste of time to look at what it takes to be a modern music maker?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:27 – Introduction

    * 00:50 – Rant

    * 03:46 – Closing thoughts



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    While I was writing my November Life Update, I ended up going on a bit of a rant. And I thought this would be worthy of sharing everywhere, including the podcast. I’ll probably put this in video form as well, and maybe I’ll recite it elsewhere.

    But for now, here it is in podcast form, and this is simply titled: Don’t Make Me Laugh.

    [The full transcription for the rant is available in the Life Update: November 2020 post – simply scroll down until you see the “Don’t Make Me Laugh” header.]

    If you think music is worth talking about, show that you care by heading over to MusicEntrepreneurHQ.com/Join and pick up your free guide. We’ve got several to choose from, and they’re all high quality. Again, go to MusicEntrepreneurHQ.com/Join to download your gift and join the insider’s circle.

    This has been episode 217 of The New Music Industry Podcast. I’m David Andrew Wiebe, and I look forward to seeing you on the stages of the world.

    • 5 min
    216 – Stop Being so ButtHurt Over Everything

    216 – Stop Being so ButtHurt Over Everything

    Is constant rejection and criticism getting you down? Does it seem like others go out of their way to offend you?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.



    Download the PDF transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:26 – Sensitivity and offense

    * 01:16 – Don’t take it so personally!

    * 02:32 – Get a second, third, and fourth opinion

    * 04:11 – Use negative feedback to improve

    * 06:31 – You can only feel offended inside

    * 07:41 – Episode summary



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    Today I wanted to share about sensitivity and offense. Because as artists we always seem to base our value or outlook on what someone else thinks or says.

    At the outset, let me tell you that you’ll never know what anyone else is thinking unless you ask them. It’s impossible. So, everything you’re thinking is probably based on a story you’ve constructed in your head, and you’ve either got to a) ask that person what they’re thinking, or b) let go and be complete with it to move forward.

    But being butthurt over everything is so common and so counterproductive that it can end up wasting a lot of precious time. It can easily ruin your life and your career.

    So, let’s talk about this.

    Interpreting the Comments of Others

    The first thing I want to get into is how we interpret the comments of others. Because we would never feel rejected or criticized if not for things others have said.

    1. Ask Yourself Whether the Comment was About You

    So, it’s been my observation that as creatives we’ll often enter conversations not informing others of our intention. But we’ll steer the conversation in such a way that we’ll get the answer we think we want. We do this without establishing any context, so the person we’re talking to isn’t even sure of our intentions.

    It’s like a girl asking a guy “is there anyone in your life you think is worth fighting for right now?”

    What she’s really asking is whether she’s worth fighting for. But that’s not what she asked. So, she will interpret the answer “no” as meaning she’s not worthwhile, or she will interpret the answer “yes” as meaning he has a girlfriend already.

    Either way, she’ll take it negatively.

    By the way, I’m using the pronoun “she” here, but guys are just as likely to ask ambiguous, leading questions like this, so don’t take this in a sexist direction.

    So, the first thing to understand is that in a conversation like this, whatever response you get, it was not about you. Because you did not ask about you, you asked generally.

    It takes courage to ask what another honestly thinks about you, but it’s not worth the offense if you haven’t done the hard work of asking about yourself specifically.

    Before you take anything personally, first ask yourself whether it was said about you.

    2. Don’t Take What One Person Says as Final

    You’ve probably heard stories of people who got a diagnosis from a doctor. But they were compelled to get a second, and a third, and a fourth opinion, because either they did not trust what they were being told or thought there might be another way to combat their illness.

    Yet, what I see all the time is artists taking one person’s opinion as final.

    They’ll hear “you’re too young, you’re too old, you’re too fat, you’re too skinny, you’re not experienced enough, you’re too experienced, your music’s not good enough, you’re not marketable, you’re not our style” or some variation thereof and take it personally.

    First, just as I said in point one, we’ve got to check to ensure this comment was said specifically about us, right?

    But beyond that, no matter the authority of the individual, if it’s just one opinion, it’s just one opinion.

    So, one a href="https://www.

    • 10 min

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