101 episodes

Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Scientist Weekly New Scientist

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 19 Ratings

Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    #101: Man gets first pig heart transplant; robot therapy for mental health; omicron update; dolphin sexual pleasure

    #101: Man gets first pig heart transplant; robot therapy for mental health; omicron update; dolphin sexual pleasure

    David Bennett has become the first person in history to have a pig to human heart transplant. Scientists have edited several genes to make this possible. On the pod, the team say that if it proves successful longer term, it could be a game-changer for medicine. In cetacean news, have you ever wondered why dolphins have so much sex? Patricia Brennan from Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts has been studying dolphin clitorises, and shares her findings with the team. We now know much more about the omicron variant of coronavirus, and with more than half of people in Europe set to catch it in the next 6 to 8 weeks, the team explains why the variant is more infectious. There’s a double dose of moon news this week - first there’s the discovery that Saturn’s moon Mimas may have an ocean beneath its surface, and then we have the first water ever detected by a robot on our Moon. And novelist and New Scientist columnist Annalee Newitz joins the discussion to share their experiences with a robot therapist called Woebot. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Clare Wilson and Leah Crane. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts. Thanks to our sponsor Brilliant - remember the first 200 people to sign up using this link http://brilliant.org/newscientist will get 20% off unlimited access to all the courses on Brilliant for a whole year.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 32 min
    #100: New Scientist journalists pick out their scientific and cultural highlights for 2022

    #100: New Scientist journalists pick out their scientific and cultural highlights for 2022

    In this special episode the team looks ahead to the next 12 months, sharing the science and cultural events they’re most looking forward to in 2022. Highlights include the launch into orbit of SpaceX’s Starship, the opening of a new Stonehenge exhibition at The British Museum, the TV adaptation of Kate Atkinson’s novel ‘Life After Life’, and an innovative new breast cancer trial. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Tiffany O’Callaghan, Adam Vaughan, Graham Lawton and Richard Webb. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts. From the team at New Scientist, Happy New Year!
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 23 min
    #99: The legendary New Scientist end-of-year holiday party and quiz

    #99: The legendary New Scientist end-of-year holiday party and quiz

    What a year 2021 has been. For our final podcast of the year, we’re signing off with a party and quiz. And as this is a Christmas special, this quiz delivers a sleigh-full of optimism, starting with a look at the ‘funniest science story of the year’. Other categories include ‘the story that made you feel small’, ‘life form of the year’, ‘hero of the year’ and ‘most surprising story’. Contestants also field questions from the audience and they share the story they’re most hoping for in 2022. Rowan Hooper is judging proceedings, with panelists Penny Sarchet, Richard Webb, Sam Wong and Bethan Ackerley. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts. From the team at New Scientist, Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and a Happy New Year!
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 39 min
    #98: Brain cells wired to the Matrix; omicron latest; how to make truly intelligent machines; the mysterious border between sleep and wake

    #98: Brain cells wired to the Matrix; omicron latest; how to make truly intelligent machines; the mysterious border between sleep and wake

    In a step towards creating intelligent cyborg brains, Cortical Labs in Melbourne have trained lab-grown brain organoids to play a classic 1970s video game. The team explains how the brain cells live in a Matrix-like, simulated world, where all they know is Pong. And there’s more AI news, as the team digs into DeepMind’s invention of a ‘search engine’ style supercomputer, one much smaller than its competitors. The team discusses sleep, and how manipulating the hypnagogic phase of sleep can lead to bursts of creativity. As the holiday season approaches, Omicron shows no signs of letting up, so the team brings you up to speed on what we know so far. And they bring two bird related stories, one about the superpowers of zebra finches and the other about the link between personality types and feather colours in turkeys. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Michael Le Page, Clare Wilson and Matt Sparkes. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 25 min
    #97: The latest on omicron; Don’t Look Up review; Steven Pinker on human rationality; the sound of melting glaciers

    #97: The latest on omicron; Don’t Look Up review; Steven Pinker on human rationality; the sound of melting glaciers

    Omicron is spreading quickly and once again we’re facing another wave of infections and restrictions over the holiday period. The team says although it’s early days, we’re beginning to get a handle on why this covid-19 variant is so good at dodging immunity, and they unpack ‘misleading’ reports that it causes milder infections.  Climate journalist Emily Atkin joins the team to discuss Netflix’s new satire Don’t Look Up, which follows the story of two astronomers and their attempts to warn humanity of an approaching comet that will destroy the planet. As well as that, renowned cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker joins the pod to discuss his new book ‘Rationality’, which outlines the major forces underlying our irrational tendencies. The team also brings you the bubbling sounds of melting glaciers, and they share news of a new kind of GPS that uses cosmic rays. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Michael Le Page and Chelsea Whyte. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 27 min
    #96: What does the rise of omicron mean for us?; living robots able to reproduce; mini black holes and the end of the universe

    #96: What does the rise of omicron mean for us?; living robots able to reproduce; mini black holes and the end of the universe

    Omicron, a new covid-19 variant of concern, has become the most common variant in South Africa and is spreading fast. The team examines fears that it may be more transmissible than the delta variant, and better at evading vaccines and immunity. Following research of 5000-year-old beer jars, the team finds out that Ancient Egyptians used to eat (or drink?) alcoholic beer porridge - seriously! Then they go back even further in time to discover the origins of water, and how new evidence suggests water first arrived on Earth like rain from space. They also find out how living robots - xenobots - are able to reproduce, and bring news of a black hole doomsday double whammy. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet and Carissa Wong. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts. Thanks to our sponsor Brilliant - remember the first 200 people to sign up using this link http://brilliant.org/newscientist will get 20% off unlimited access to all the courses on Brilliant for a whole year.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
19 Ratings

19 Ratings

Slevin14 ,

Great podcast from an even better magazine

Shout out to New Scientist for being the best Science journalism I know of.

Pumpkinpierules ,

Left wing bias

This show is informative when it sticks to science. It’s infuriating when it wheels in convenient left wing “experts” who eg a) assert, without evidence, that more welfare state is the solution for Covid 19 and b) refuse to recognize that closing down Chinese wet markets will stop the majority of these viruses appearing.

More precision and science please, and less self-serving generalities that are naive and impractical and simply rehearse the interviewees’ political prejudices, masquerading under the cover of Science.

Top Podcasts In Science

Hidden Brain
Alie Ward
PRX and Greater Good Science Center
Sam Harris
Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying
Neil deGrasse Tyson

You Might Also Like

BBC Radio 4
The Guardian
BBC Radio 4
BBC World Service
BBC Radio 4
BBC World Service