1 hr 5 min

Nymphing Tight Line to the Indicator Style -- Contact Nymphing Principles With An Indy Troutbitten

    • Wilderness

In Episode 12, my friends and I talk about nymphing tactics — specifically, how we take tight line principles and the tight line advantage over to an indicator nymphing system.
We know that with refined skills and tactics, we can often make something happen, even on slow days. And there’s really no better way to consistently fool trout — in all conditions — than to get good drifts with a nymph. These small aquatic insects are the primary food source for most trout. And with nymphing skills, we don’t need to wait for rising trout or a streamer bite.
Being a nymphing angler is a sustainable and successful approach. We can do it all year long — anywhere that trout live.
So what’s the best way to nymph?
In this episode, my friends and I dig deep into one of the best ways — a nymphing tactic that I call Tight Line to the Indicator. Because when tight line or euro nymphing fails — for a variety of reasons — the answer, most often, is to take those contact principles — that tight line advantage — and combine it with an indicator system. Because the indy allows us to do things that are simply impossible on a pure tight line.
So . . . I often make the point, or make this argument, that tight line or contact nymphing tactics can’t be beat — that using the tight line advantage is almost unarguably the best way to get great dead drifts while having control over the course of the flies and great strike detection. But what I mean by that is not just pure tight lining. Because tight line to the indicator style is also part of my system.
When it’s the best tool for the job, then putting an indy on a tight line rig is a deadly variation. I build my leader to be ready for it. The rod I carry is designed for it. Because tight line to the indicator is a problem solving approach that gets the job done when pure tight lining simply cannot.
We Cover the Following
What does this rig look like?What is this Tight line to the indicator approach?Why isn’t this style more popular or well-know?What is so special about going tight line to the indy?When do we use this style?How to line everything up in one seamLanding with contact and withoutIndicator stylesThe downsides of this approachGear for this approachResources
READ: Troutbitten | Tight Line Nymphing with an Indicator -- A Mono Rig Variant
READ: Troutbitten | Nymphing Tight Line vs Indicator
READ: Troutbitten | One Great Nymphing Trick
READ: Troutbitten | Category | The Mono Rig

Visit:

Troutbitten Website

Troutbitten Instagram

Troutbitten YouTube

Troutbitten Facebook
Thank You to Pre-Roll Ad Sponsors:AvidmaxUse code TROUT10 for 10% off your cart at AvidmaxandOrvis

In Episode 12, my friends and I talk about nymphing tactics — specifically, how we take tight line principles and the tight line advantage over to an indicator nymphing system.
We know that with refined skills and tactics, we can often make something happen, even on slow days. And there’s really no better way to consistently fool trout — in all conditions — than to get good drifts with a nymph. These small aquatic insects are the primary food source for most trout. And with nymphing skills, we don’t need to wait for rising trout or a streamer bite.
Being a nymphing angler is a sustainable and successful approach. We can do it all year long — anywhere that trout live.
So what’s the best way to nymph?
In this episode, my friends and I dig deep into one of the best ways — a nymphing tactic that I call Tight Line to the Indicator. Because when tight line or euro nymphing fails — for a variety of reasons — the answer, most often, is to take those contact principles — that tight line advantage — and combine it with an indicator system. Because the indy allows us to do things that are simply impossible on a pure tight line.
So . . . I often make the point, or make this argument, that tight line or contact nymphing tactics can’t be beat — that using the tight line advantage is almost unarguably the best way to get great dead drifts while having control over the course of the flies and great strike detection. But what I mean by that is not just pure tight lining. Because tight line to the indicator style is also part of my system.
When it’s the best tool for the job, then putting an indy on a tight line rig is a deadly variation. I build my leader to be ready for it. The rod I carry is designed for it. Because tight line to the indicator is a problem solving approach that gets the job done when pure tight lining simply cannot.
We Cover the Following
What does this rig look like?What is this Tight line to the indicator approach?Why isn’t this style more popular or well-know?What is so special about going tight line to the indy?When do we use this style?How to line everything up in one seamLanding with contact and withoutIndicator stylesThe downsides of this approachGear for this approachResources
READ: Troutbitten | Tight Line Nymphing with an Indicator -- A Mono Rig Variant
READ: Troutbitten | Nymphing Tight Line vs Indicator
READ: Troutbitten | One Great Nymphing Trick
READ: Troutbitten | Category | The Mono Rig

Visit:

Troutbitten Website

Troutbitten Instagram

Troutbitten YouTube

Troutbitten Facebook
Thank You to Pre-Roll Ad Sponsors:AvidmaxUse code TROUT10 for 10% off your cart at AvidmaxandOrvis

1 hr 5 min