9 episodes

Pod Save our History is a public history podcast about the nexus between American legal history and African American history hosted by Jonathan Di Carlo. Episodes focus on the stories behind our history, the stories that are often changed, manipulated, and whitewashed to accommodate the perspectives of the dominant groups in our society.Contact: jonathan@jonathandicarlo.com

Pod Save our History Jonathan Di Carlo

    • History
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Pod Save our History is a public history podcast about the nexus between American legal history and African American history hosted by Jonathan Di Carlo. Episodes focus on the stories behind our history, the stories that are often changed, manipulated, and whitewashed to accommodate the perspectives of the dominant groups in our society.Contact: jonathan@jonathandicarlo.com

    American Voting Rights Part 4: The Proverbial End of the Voting Rights Act

    American Voting Rights Part 4: The Proverbial End of the Voting Rights Act

    Since the November 2020 election, Voting Rights has been ever-present in the daily news cycle because of the attempts across a majority of state legislatures to enact legislation to alleges to enhance voting security but continues the harmful historical pattern of minority-voter discrimination.

    In the series, American Voting Rights, Jonathan discusses the history of voting rights between the Civil War and the Civil Rights era which led to the passing of the Voting Rights Act. The episode reflects on the key provisions of the Voting Rights Act which enabled broad and unprecedented federal oversight of state election legislation through the Enforcement Clauses of the 14th and 15th Amendments to the United States Constitution.

    In this final episode, Jonathan discusses the impact of the Roberts Court on the Voting Rights act through the 2013 case Shelby County v. Holder and the 2020 case Brnovich v. DNC which effectively disempowered the most effective aspects of the Voting Rights Act.

    Resources:
    Shelby County v. Holder case, click here.
    Brnovich v. DNC case, click here.
    "Race, Law, and American Society: 1607 to Present," by Gloria Brown-Marshall, 2013. 

    Sign up here to get updates about each episode of Pod Save our History or go to jonathandicarlo.substack.com.

    For any comments or feedback, write to jonathan@jonathandicarlo.com

    Contact info:
    Website: jonathandicarlo.comYouTube: @podsaveourhistoryFacebook: @podsaveourhistoryTwitter: @jonathandicarlo or @podsavehistoryLinkedIn: @jonathandicarloInstagram: @jonathanmichaeldicarlo or Patreon: @jonathandicarlo

    • 22 min
    American Voting Rights Part 3: Reagan's "Colorblindness" v. The Voting Rights Act

    American Voting Rights Part 3: Reagan's "Colorblindness" v. The Voting Rights Act

    Since the November 2020 election, Voting Rights has been ever-present in the daily news cycle because of the attempts across a majority of state legislatures to enact legislation to alleges to enhance voting security but continues the harmful historical pattern of minority voter discrimination.

    In the series, American Voting Rights, Jonathan discusses the history of voting rights between the Civil War and the Civil Rights era which led to the passing of the Voting Rights Act. The episode includes a brief description of the key provisions of the Voting Rights Act which enabled broad and unprecedented federal oversight of state election legislation through the Enforcement Clause of the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

    As this series progresses from the Civil Rights era when the Voting Rights Act was enacted through to the most recent Supreme Court opinions that dismantled the law, a key question to keep in mind is whether the Civil Rights advancements of the 1960s represented true progress or merely a brief moment in history when the interests of white Americans converged with the interests of Black Americans.

    For the Shaw v. Reno, Attorney General  opinion, click here.

    Sign up here to get updates about each episode of Pod Save our History or go to jonathandicarlo.substack.com.

    For any comments or feedback, write to jonathan@jonathandicarlo.com

    Contact info:
    Website: jonathandicarlo.comYouTube: @podsaveourhistoryFacebook: @podsaveourhistoryTwitter: @jonathandicarlo or @podsavehistoryLinkedIn: @jonathandicarloInstagram: @jonathanmichaeldicarlo or Patreon: @jonathandicarlo

    • 12 min
    American Voting Rights Part 2: The First Challenges to the Voting Rights Act

    American Voting Rights Part 2: The First Challenges to the Voting Rights Act

    Since the November 2020 election, Voting Rights has been ever-present in the daily news cycle because of the attempts across a majority of state legislatures to enact legislation to alleges to enhance voting security but continues the harmful historical pattern of minority voter discrimination.

    In the series, American Voting Rights, Jonathan discusses the history of voting rights between the Civil War and the Civil Rights era which led to the passing of the Voting Rights Act. The episode includes a brief description of the key provisions of the Voting Rights Act which enabled broad and unprecedented federal oversight of state election legislation through the Enforcement Clause of the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

    As this series progresses from the Civil Rights era when the Voting Rights Act was enacted through to the most recent Supreme Court opinions that dismantled the law, a key question to keep in mind is whether the Civil Rights advancements of the 1960s represented true progress or merely a brief moment in history when the interests of white Americans converged with the interests of Black Americans.

    For the Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, click here.

    Sign up here to get updates about each episode of Pod Save our History or go to jonathandicarlo.substack.com.

    For any comments or feedback, write to jonathan@jonathandicarlo.com

    Contact info:
    Website: jonathandicarlo.comYouTube: @podsaveourhistoryFacebook: @podsaveourhistoryTwitter: @jonathandicarlo or @podsavehistoryLinkedIn: @jonathandicarloInstagram: @jonathanmichaeldicarlo or Patreon: @jonathandicarlo

    • 21 min
    American Voting Rights - Part I

    American Voting Rights - Part I

    Since the November 2020 election, Voting Rights has been ever-present in the daily news cycle because of the attempts across a majority of state legislatures to enact legislation to alleges to enhance voting security but continues the harmful historical pattern of minority voter discrimination.

    In the series, American Voting Rights, Jonathan discusses the history of voting rights between the Civil War and the Civil Rights era which led to the passing of the Voting Rights Act. The episode includes a brief description of the key provisions of the Voting Rights Act which enabled broad and unprecedented federal oversight of state election legislation through the Enforcement Clause of the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

    As this series progresses from the Civil Rights era when the Voting Rights Act was enacted through to the most recent Supreme Court opinions that dismantled the law, a key question to keep in mind is whether the Civil Rights advancements of the 1960s represented true progress or merely a brief moment in history when the interests of white Americans converged with the interests of Black Americans.

    Sign up here to get updates about each episode of Pod Save our History or go to jonathandicarlo.substack.com.

    For any comments or feedback, write to jonathan@jonathandicarlo.com

    Contact info:
    Website: jonathandicarlo.comYouTube: @podsaveourhistoryFacebook: @podsaveourhistoryTwitter: @jonathandicarlo or @podsavehistoryLinkedIn: @jonathandicarloInstagram: @jonathanmichaeldicarlo or Patreon: @jonathandicarloOrganizations Helping Afghan Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) Allies:
    The List ProjectVets for American IdealsNo One Left Behind One Cause The International Committee to Rescue Afghan SIVs

    • 25 min
    The Rise of the Supreme Court - Part 3

    The Rise of the Supreme Court - Part 3

    The Presidential election in the fall of 1800 marked a pivotal moment for the United States of America as a new nation. It marked the first time in American history that the political factions which controlled the Congress and the Presidency were set to change hands -- from the Federalists to the Democratic-Republicans. Some have dubbed this moment, when one party willingly turned over control of the government to another party, as a quiet revolution. But was it really a quiet revolution?

    In the time between the election of 1800 and the inauguration of the new president Thomas Jefferson in March of 1801, the outgoing Federalists filled the court system with Federalist judges and other appointees as a way of resisting or diminishing the political power of the Democratic-Republicans. These judges were known as the "Midnight Judges".

    When President Jefferson and James Madison attempted to stop four of those late nominations it led to a confrontation between the Jefferson administration and the then inconsequential Supreme Court through the Marbury v. Madison case.

    What resulted was a revolution of the judiciary branch which took one large step towards becoming the most powerful branch of the US government.

    Sign up here to get updates about each episode of Pod Save our History or go to jonathandicarlo.substack.com.

    For any comments or feedback, write to jonathan@jonathandicarlo.com

    Contact info:
    Website: jonathandicarlo.comYouTube: @podsaveourhistoryFacebook: @podsaveourhistoryTwitter: @jonathandicarlo or @podsavehistoryLinkedIn: @jonathandicarloInstagram: @jonathanmichaeldicarloPatreon: @jonathandicarlo

    • 20 min
    The Rise of the Supreme Court - Part 2

    The Rise of the Supreme Court - Part 2

    The Presidential election in the fall of 1800 marked a pivotal moment for the United States of America as a new nation. It marked the first time in American history that the political factions which controlled the Congress and the Presidency were set to change hands -- from the Federalists to the Democratic-Republicans. Some have dubbed this moment, when one party willingly turned over control of the government to another party, as a quiet revolution. But was it really a quiet revolution?

    In the time between the election of 1800 and the inauguration of the new president Thomas Jefferson in March of 1801, the outgoing Federalists filled the court system with Federalist judges and other appointees as a way of resisting or diminishing the political power of the Democratic-Republicans. These judges were known as the "Midnight Judges".

    When President Jefferson and James Madison attempted to stop four of those late nominations it led to a confrontation between the Jefferson administration and the then inconsequential Supreme Court through the Marbury v. Madison case.

    What resulted was a revolution of the judiciary branch which took one large step towards becoming the most powerful branch of the US government.

    Sign up here to get updates about each episode of Pod Save our History or go to jonathandicarlo.substack.com.

    For any comments or feedback, write to jonathan@jonathandicarlo.com

    Contact info:
    Website: jonathandicarlo.comYouTube: @podsaveourhistoryFacebook: @podsaveourhistoryTwitter: @jonathandicarlo or @podsavehistoryLinkedIn: @jonathandicarloInstagram: @jonathanmichaeldicarloPatreon: @jonathandicarlo

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

Top Podcasts In History

CBC Podcasts
Sarah Marshall
Wondery
Incongruity
Pushkin Industries
Goalhanger Podcasts