27 episodes

CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

Quirks and Quarks from CBC Radio CBC

    • Science
    • 4.6 • 1.5K Ratings

CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

    Sounds of a predator, horses are well-diggers, grass defuses a toxic explosive, plastic from fish waste, Animals mate with relatives, mastodon poop and pupillary variety.

    Sounds of a predator, horses are well-diggers, grass defuses a toxic explosive, plastic from fish waste, Animals mate with relatives, mastodon poop and pupillary variety.

    Wild donkeys and horses dig wells in the desert, and create a refuge for plants and animals; Genetically modified grass can suck toxic explosives out of the ground; Animals don't seem to much care if they mate with relatives; Making the most of fish waste: how scientists transformed it into biodegradable plastic; Digging into 75,000 year old mastodon dung to learn about ancient Nova Scotia; Why do some animals have slit shaped pupils?

    • 54 min
    Lightning cleans the atmosphere, a 142 year - and counting - experiment, sea turtles ‘lost years’ found, finding the Mother Tree and why we cry

    Lightning cleans the atmosphere, a 142 year - and counting - experiment, sea turtles ‘lost years’ found, finding the Mother Tree and why we cry

    Scientists shocked to discover how much lightning cleans the atmosphere; Digging up 142-year-old seeds in the latest instalment in the world’s oldest experiment; Researchers solve the mystery of loggerhead turtle's lost years; A pioneering forest researcher's memoir describes 'Finding the Mother Tree'; Why do we cry when we are sad?

    • 54 min
    Mars helicopter, Narwhal tusks and pollution, T. Rex in their billions , airborne COVID, and what we need to know about geoengineering

    Mars helicopter, Narwhal tusks and pollution, T. Rex in their billions , airborne COVID, and what we need to know about geoengineering

    How NASA built and flew the first helicopter to fly on another planet; The horn of the unicorn of the sea reveals a dirty secret about arctic pollution; Billions and billions of Tyrannosaurs walked the Earth; How long before we all understand that SARS-CoV-2 COVID is airborne?; Understanding geoengineering - why we need to investigate last resort to tackle climate change.

    • 54 min
    Mother ants shrinking brains, boreal forest tree shifts, finding a new blue, airborne plastic pollution, and a new book looks at ‘Life’s Edge’

    Mother ants shrinking brains, boreal forest tree shifts, finding a new blue, airborne plastic pollution, and a new book looks at ‘Life’s Edge’

    These ants shrink their brains for motherhood — but can also grow them back; Intense boreal forest fires may change tree species, and lead to more carbon uptake; ‘Where’s the blue food?’ Scientists find source for natural blue food dye in red cabbage; Tons of microplastic is being thrown into the atmosphere from roads, oceans and fields; Contemplating what it means to be alive in the new book ‘Life’s Edge’.

    • 54 min
    Coyotes doing well in the city, asteroid impact created rainforests, the minimal organism, elephant seals fear of the light and why warmer springs could mean earlier falls

    Coyotes doing well in the city, asteroid impact created rainforests, the minimal organism, elephant seals fear of the light and why warmer springs could mean earlier falls

    How “wily” coyotes have managed to find success in the city like no other predator; The asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs might have created the rainforests; Scientists create the simplest cell with only the bare essentials for it to live and reproduce; Elephant seals buoyantly navigate ‘lightscape of fear’ in long sea migrations; Climate change might make autumn leaves appear — and disappear — earlier.

    • 54 min
    Gorilla troops raise orphans, Canadian laser cools antimatter, concussion spit test, octopus sleep and dreams, forensic science in real life and blood of many colours

    Gorilla troops raise orphans, Canadian laser cools antimatter, concussion spit test, octopus sleep and dreams, forensic science in real life and blood of many colours

    Giant silverback gorillas show a gentler side in looking after orphans; ‘Cool’ new Canadian-built laser will help scientists probe antimatter mysteries; Game-changing saliva test could rapidly diagnose concussions for athletes; Octopuses sleep in technicolour. Do they dream, too?; A new book looks at forensic science beyond what we see on TV; Do all creatures on Earth have red blood?

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
1.5K Ratings

1.5K Ratings

Staachy ,

Transcendence

I love this podcast. It makes me feel like I am homeschooling my kids. I was listening recently to a news story about quantum physics and it turns out quarks are more mysterious then first supposed. I think the announcer even said that they were quirky. I shut down the program immediately because I just knew that I need to hear about this for the first time from Bob.

PDaddy1815 ,

Throw away the Scripts

I listen to many science podcasts, and this is the only one that relies so heavily on participants reading from a script, with questions pre-submitted to guests and then read off from a script by the host, and interviewees reading back answers from a script. The lack of spontaneity is so obvious that I have stopped listening after 25 years. Good only if you are doing something else like driving or cooking, but not if just listening and nothing else. It is like listening to an amateur, high school play about science.

Lady of Shalot ,

Favourite Podcast

Bob is an excellent host and explains some of the more technical concepts, helping his guests communicate. I always learn so much from listening and all of the segments catch my interest. If you like real science and the latest discoveries, this is your show.

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