10 episodes

RCRM Speakers Series is a new program launched by The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum. The goal of the program is to engage with patrons by means of academic research across the country. Scholars of history or history buffs, well-known authors or museum curators were invited for a talk of their choice. For the inaugural year, two anniversaries are in focus: 120 years since the Battle of Paardeberg, during the South African War and the 75th anniversary from the end of the Second World War. The talks are intended as a monthly public event throughout 2020, recorded live in view of producing this podcast. Guest-speakers accompany their talks with images, moving or still; voice over is added to clarify the use of support material as necessary. When it is possible, the Q&As at the end of the presentation are included.
The COVID-19 pandemic was declared only two weeks before the third event, which forced us into a different approach. The third event of the series is cancelled, but the program continues in April 2020 as an audiovisual production streamed on the museum YouTube channel. Until the quarantine is revoked, 2020 Speakers Series remains an on-line event.
Program Director Mark Vogelsang from Ontario Institute of Audio Recording Technology recorded the public events and continues to do so until we complete the 2020 Speakers Series podcast.

RCRM Speakers Series - Season 1 The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum, Georgiana Stanciu, Mark Vogelsang, Jonathan Vance, Gord Heath, Alex Fitzgerald Black, Sarah Poulin, Michael O'Leary, Aldona Sendzikas, Katrina Pasierbek, Heather Ellis, Grant Maltman

    • History
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

RCRM Speakers Series is a new program launched by The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum. The goal of the program is to engage with patrons by means of academic research across the country. Scholars of history or history buffs, well-known authors or museum curators were invited for a talk of their choice. For the inaugural year, two anniversaries are in focus: 120 years since the Battle of Paardeberg, during the South African War and the 75th anniversary from the end of the Second World War. The talks are intended as a monthly public event throughout 2020, recorded live in view of producing this podcast. Guest-speakers accompany their talks with images, moving or still; voice over is added to clarify the use of support material as necessary. When it is possible, the Q&As at the end of the presentation are included.
The COVID-19 pandemic was declared only two weeks before the third event, which forced us into a different approach. The third event of the series is cancelled, but the program continues in April 2020 as an audiovisual production streamed on the museum YouTube channel. Until the quarantine is revoked, 2020 Speakers Series remains an on-line event.
Program Director Mark Vogelsang from Ontario Institute of Audio Recording Technology recorded the public events and continues to do so until we complete the 2020 Speakers Series podcast.

    A Cenotaph for the Community: How Londoners Have Remembered the First World War

    A Cenotaph for the Community: How Londoners Have Remembered the First World War

    In the years following the First World War the citizens of London, Ontario raised local memorials to honour the generation who served in the war. Built in 1934, the most prominent local structure is the Cenotaph located at Dufferin Avenue and Wellington Street, but few Londoners are aware of its complicated and intriguing history.

    • 39 min
    Murder Comes to Westminster: The Killing of Pte. A. Buttery

    Murder Comes to Westminster: The Killing of Pte. A. Buttery

    Heather Ellis shares her... investigation into the circumstances of Andrew Buttery’s death, who was bludgeoned by a psychiatric patient on 9 June 1933, at Westminster Hospital, currently known as Parkwood Institute in London, ON. Following the unfortunate event, the Department of Pensions and National Health initiated an inquiry. Heather has researched hospital archives and will try to answer legitimate questions arising from this story.

    • 44 min
    “You, Sir Frederick, Will be Chairman: Military Research and the NRC (1937-1941)”

    “You, Sir Frederick, Will be Chairman: Military Research and the NRC (1937-1941)”

    One hundred years after the discovery of the insulin, Sir Frederick Banting continues to be remembered from the perspective of a singular moment in time, the image of himself with Charles Best and a dog on the rooftop of the University of Toronto Medical School. But, like any other story, that representation is neither the beginning, nor the end of his contributions to Canadian science and innovation. For episode 8 of the RCRM Speakers Series, Grant Maltman will introduce the other facets of the complex personality that was Sir Frederick Banting.

    • 42 min
    Stanley Barracks. The Life and Times of Toronto’s Military Garrison

    Stanley Barracks. The Life and Times of Toronto’s Military Garrison

    In Exhibition Place near the heart of downtown Toronto, surrounded by a sea of concrete parking lots and modern buildings, an imposing but incongruous-looking mid-19th century structure stands its ground. This two-storey stone building is the last remaining structure of Stanley Barracks, once the main military establishment for the Toronto Garrison. In this episode, Dr. Aldona Sendzikas is for pondering over the amazing history of Toronto’s Military garrison.

    • 58 min
    Hard Labour: Beyond the Internet Search

    Hard Labour: Beyond the Internet Search

    “Hard Labour: Beyond the Internet Search” literally takes us to the depth of historical research. With information available at the click of a mouse button, it is easy nowadays to overlook how much data remains undigitized. When the assumption that all the important information is accessible has been stripped away, a change in perspective is needed. Working with previously overlooked material, a researcher can find new ground from which to challenge established views and find areas where the accepted history falls short in capturing the full story.

    • 50 min
    The Aerodrome of Democracy: The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan in Southwestern Ontario

    The Aerodrome of Democracy: The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan in Southwestern Ontario

    Between 1939 and 1945, the Air Force saw greater expansion in Canada in comparison with the Army or the Navy. With over 200,000 men and 17,000 women enlisted, 39 RCAF Squadrons at home and No. 6 RCAF Group with RAF Bomber Command, the RCAF became the fourth-largest air force in the world. There are many components to this unprecedented expansion, but one of them in particular has attracted Michael Baker’s attention: the British Commonwealth Training Plan.

    • 42 min

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