56 min

Ep. 60 - Teaching To the Human-Storied Brain with Dr. Sandy Bonny Science 360

    • Education

Sandy Marie Bonny is a writer, visual artist, and earth scientist (PhD 2007, UAlberta; MSc 2002, UAlberta; BSc 2000, UBC) whose creative practice is grounded in interdisciplinary perspectives and engages the storied media of paper, pigment, and stone.

Her writing has appeared in academic and literary journals and anthologies, including The Shape of Content—Creative Writing in Mathematics and Science (2008) and Coming Attractions 11 (2011); as well as two book-length publications, The Sometimes Lake (stories, 2012) and Yes, and Back Again (novel, 2015). Sandy is an advocate of interdisciplinary and multi-vocal literacies and believes in the power of story to connect, teach, and motivate personal agency for listeners of all ages.

She has brought science, stories, and students together for over 20 years in roles coordinating, developing, and delivering community-based STEM outreach programs and post-secondary STEM access and equity initiatives, alongside graduate studies, university teaching, and creative work.

Sandy currently leads the USask College of Arts and Science Indigenous Student Achievement Pathways (ISAP) and STEM Access Initiative team, which welcomes First Nations, Inuit and Métis students to the University of Saskatchewan (USask) with academic and co-curricular programming that builds confidence, knowledge and skills.

Sandy is a non-Indigenous member of Saskatchewan's Treaty 6 community in the homelands of the Métis people; she lives and works in Saskatoon.

Links to Sandy's pages/media:
https://www.sbonny.com/
https://artsandscience.usask.ca/profile/SBonny

Links to Sandy's books:
Thistledown Press
The Sometimes Lake https://thistledownpress.com/product/the-sometimes-lake/
Yes, and Back Again https://thistledownpress.com/product/yes-and-back-again/

Links to articles mentioned in the episode:
Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis, et al. "Teaching about the importance of trees: A study with young children." Environmental Education Research 17.4 (2011): 519-536. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504622.2010.549938

What We Believe But Cannot Prove; Science in the Age of Certainty
https://www.amazon.ca/What-Believe-but-Cannot-Prove/dp/0060841818

Firestein, Stuart. Ignorance: How it drives science. OUP USA, 2012. https://books.google.ca/books?hl=en&lr=&id=SrK7iS3E8nAC&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=ignorance+how+it+drives+science&ots=I5TBHXSkU1&sig=9hE0WlcAUbtUG1ckxxKHRL2G1uM&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=ignorance%20how%20it%20drives%20science&f=false

Phillips, Jonathan. "Storytelling in Earth sciences: The eight basic plots." Earth-Science Reviews 115.3 (2012): 153-162. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0012825212001249

Sandy Marie Bonny is a writer, visual artist, and earth scientist (PhD 2007, UAlberta; MSc 2002, UAlberta; BSc 2000, UBC) whose creative practice is grounded in interdisciplinary perspectives and engages the storied media of paper, pigment, and stone.

Her writing has appeared in academic and literary journals and anthologies, including The Shape of Content—Creative Writing in Mathematics and Science (2008) and Coming Attractions 11 (2011); as well as two book-length publications, The Sometimes Lake (stories, 2012) and Yes, and Back Again (novel, 2015). Sandy is an advocate of interdisciplinary and multi-vocal literacies and believes in the power of story to connect, teach, and motivate personal agency for listeners of all ages.

She has brought science, stories, and students together for over 20 years in roles coordinating, developing, and delivering community-based STEM outreach programs and post-secondary STEM access and equity initiatives, alongside graduate studies, university teaching, and creative work.

Sandy currently leads the USask College of Arts and Science Indigenous Student Achievement Pathways (ISAP) and STEM Access Initiative team, which welcomes First Nations, Inuit and Métis students to the University of Saskatchewan (USask) with academic and co-curricular programming that builds confidence, knowledge and skills.

Sandy is a non-Indigenous member of Saskatchewan's Treaty 6 community in the homelands of the Métis people; she lives and works in Saskatoon.

Links to Sandy's pages/media:
https://www.sbonny.com/
https://artsandscience.usask.ca/profile/SBonny

Links to Sandy's books:
Thistledown Press
The Sometimes Lake https://thistledownpress.com/product/the-sometimes-lake/
Yes, and Back Again https://thistledownpress.com/product/yes-and-back-again/

Links to articles mentioned in the episode:
Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis, et al. "Teaching about the importance of trees: A study with young children." Environmental Education Research 17.4 (2011): 519-536. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504622.2010.549938

What We Believe But Cannot Prove; Science in the Age of Certainty
https://www.amazon.ca/What-Believe-but-Cannot-Prove/dp/0060841818

Firestein, Stuart. Ignorance: How it drives science. OUP USA, 2012. https://books.google.ca/books?hl=en&lr=&id=SrK7iS3E8nAC&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=ignorance+how+it+drives+science&ots=I5TBHXSkU1&sig=9hE0WlcAUbtUG1ckxxKHRL2G1uM&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=ignorance%20how%20it%20drives%20science&f=false

Phillips, Jonathan. "Storytelling in Earth sciences: The eight basic plots." Earth-Science Reviews 115.3 (2012): 153-162. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0012825212001249

56 min

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