43 sec

Silkscreen or Screenprinting Jasper Johns Printmaking Workshop

    • Visual Arts

Silkscreen or screenprinting has its roots in wall decoration, ceramics, and fabrics produced by ancient cultures. In the 1850’s, the Japanese developed stencils held together by silk; the first patent for the process was attained in Michigan in 1887. Harder-wearing polyester meshes, ink technology, and stencil fabrication continued to evolve. The medium exploded in the fine art world in the 1960’s. With a squeegee, printing ink is spread over and forced through a screen. Ink is transferred to the paper on the other side. The final image is printed in its original orientation. A design may be applied to the screen in various ways. One method is to cut a paper stencil and attach it to the underside of the screen. Another is to paint out areas of the screen with a liquid that sets and blocks the holes in the mesh.

Silkscreen or screenprinting has its roots in wall decoration, ceramics, and fabrics produced by ancient cultures. In the 1850’s, the Japanese developed stencils held together by silk; the first patent for the process was attained in Michigan in 1887. Harder-wearing polyester meshes, ink technology, and stencil fabrication continued to evolve. The medium exploded in the fine art world in the 1960’s. With a squeegee, printing ink is spread over and forced through a screen. Ink is transferred to the paper on the other side. The final image is printed in its original orientation. A design may be applied to the screen in various ways. One method is to cut a paper stencil and attach it to the underside of the screen. Another is to paint out areas of the screen with a liquid that sets and blocks the holes in the mesh.

43 sec

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