27 episodes

Studies in National and International Development (SNID) is the longest-running weekly, interdisciplinary seminar series at Queen's University. Since 1983, SNID has proudly hosted prominent Canadian and international scholars who bring fresh perspectives to issues of local, national and global development. SNID has also organized several major workshops and conferences that have resulted in numerous publications. SNID serves a large, varied constituency of faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and community participants.



This podcast series features audio footage of the SNID lecture series. During the academic year, SNID organizes weekly seminars, which are normally held on Thursdays from 1:00 to 2:30 pm in Mackintosh Corry Hall, Room D214. Please consult the SNID Lecture listing on this website for possible changes in dates and venue. SNID also regularly sponsors conferences, film festivals, workshops and other development-related activities, all of which are posted in advance on our Lecture Calendar.



All SNID events are free and open to the public.

Studies in National and International Development Podcast Series – CFRC Podcast Network CFRC.ca Podcast Network

    • Society & Culture

Studies in National and International Development (SNID) is the longest-running weekly, interdisciplinary seminar series at Queen's University. Since 1983, SNID has proudly hosted prominent Canadian and international scholars who bring fresh perspectives to issues of local, national and global development. SNID has also organized several major workshops and conferences that have resulted in numerous publications. SNID serves a large, varied constituency of faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and community participants.



This podcast series features audio footage of the SNID lecture series. During the academic year, SNID organizes weekly seminars, which are normally held on Thursdays from 1:00 to 2:30 pm in Mackintosh Corry Hall, Room D214. Please consult the SNID Lecture listing on this website for possible changes in dates and venue. SNID also regularly sponsors conferences, film festivals, workshops and other development-related activities, all of which are posted in advance on our Lecture Calendar.



All SNID events are free and open to the public.

    2022 BRAZILIAN ELECTIONS: CONTEXT AND PERSPECTIVES AT DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT CROSSROADS 2022 BRAZILIAN ELECTIONS: CONTEXT AND PERSPECTIVES AT DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT CROSSROADS

    2022 BRAZILIAN ELECTIONS: CONTEXT AND PERSPECTIVES AT DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT CROSSROADS 2022 BRAZILIAN ELECTIONS: CONTEXT AND PERSPECTIVES AT DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT CROSSROADS

    José Marcelo Zacchi / September 22, 2022

    In this talk, José Marcelo Zacchi reflects on his years as a lawyer and public manager dedicated to the strengthening of civic space and democratic construction in Brazil. He is currently committed to the creation of Núcleo Sumaúma, a new space for the elaboration and dissemination of civil society agendas for public and political action in favour of equity and towards fair and sustainable development in Brazil. These agendas are supporting various political parties in the lead-up to the 2022 federal election. 

    • 1 hr 34 min
    Beyond, Outside, and Within: Black Studies and the University

    Beyond, Outside, and Within: Black Studies and the University

    March 31st 2022

    Equity, diversity and inclusion initiatives are often characterized as a “hallmark of the neoliberal university,” and a “non-critical, anti-theoretical and ahistorical answer to managing difference” (“Equity, Diversity, Inclusion: A Dialogue with Human Rights and Decolonization,” a roundtable hosted by Wilfred Laurier University on November 13, 2020). In this contribution to the SNID seminar series, Professors Vanessa E. Thompson and Daniel McNeil reflect on the diasporic and multi-directional articulations of Black struggles and abolitionist world-making that have informed their approaches to Black studies, interdisciplinary studies of liberation and decolonial praxis. Their wide-ranging conversation will cultivate space for critical reflection and collaborative action about the limitations and shortcomings as well as the practical benefits of an EDI framework in a higher education context where it is increasingly (if unevenly) embraced. It will also speak to the limits of top-down, national dialogues about race relations, the performativity and non-performativity of anti-racism in institutional life, and the distinctive mix of entrepreneurial fantasy and managerial technique, identity politics and market-driven policies, and mystique of meritocracy and technocratic expertise that have proliferated in the grafting of EDI initiatives onto existing multicultural policies and programs in academic, corporate, political and other institutions.

    Daniel McNeil is a Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Queen’s University and the Queen’s National Scholar Chair in Black Studies. His teaching and scholarship in Black Atlantic Studies explore how movement, travel and relocation have transformed and boosted creative development, the writing of cultural history and the calculation of political choices. Thinking While Black, his book about the political, intellectual, artistic and activist work of soul rebels, Black Atlantic intellectuals and planetary humanists over the past fifty years, will be published by Rutgers University Press and Between the Lines in the fall of 2022.

    Vanessa E. Thompson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Queen’s University. Her work focuses on black studies, abolition, critical racism and migration studies, and activist ethnographies. She has published on blackness and black movements in France and Europe more broadly, and black abolitionist struggles and world-making. Vanessa is a member of the International Independent Commission on the Death of Oury Jalloh and organizes with abolitionist feminist collectives in Europe and globally.

    • 1 hr 30 min
    Waste in its Global Dynamics: A Panel Discussion

    Waste in its Global Dynamics: A Panel Discussion

    Panelists will draw from their studies both in Canada and internationally to highlight the lives and livelihoods reproduced, sustained and compromised by the circulations and politics of waste.

    Dr Kesha Fevrier is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s University. Her research unfolds broadly at the intersection of race and space, through the systematic study of waste making and unmaking strategies. She is particularly interested in how this relationship informs the everyday lived experiences of marginalized groups in the global South.

    Dr Mohammed Rafi Arefin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of British Columbia. He researches and teaches urban environmental politics with a specific focus on waste, sanitation, and inequality. His research on Cairo’s solid waste and sewage systems has appeared in the journals Antipode, Progress in Human Geography, and the Annals of the American Association of Geographers. His new project examines how the relationship between waste, health, and urban governance is shifting in light of developments in fields of wastewater-based epidemiology.

    Dr. Josie Wittmer is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Geography & Planning at Queen’s University. She is a feminist urban researcher and educator exploring processes of urban development and change, particularly as urban imaginaries and governance mechanisms intersect with gender, caste, class, religion, and politics in South Asian cities.

    • 1 hr 31 min
    Waste: A Tale of Two Problems with Prof. Myra Hird

    Waste: A Tale of Two Problems with Prof. Myra Hird

    Canada’s waste crisis is the product of two inter-related issues: the problems of amplification and ongoing settler colonialism. In this presentation, Dr Myra Hird draws on decades of empirical waste studies research to argue that resolving our waste crisis requires an orientation away from techno-fixes and individual responsibility and towards upstream social justice issues.

    • 1 hr 25 min
    Dr. Shobhana Xavier: “Between Violence and Piety-The Case of Sufi Shrines in Sri Lanka”

    Dr. Shobhana Xavier: “Between Violence and Piety-The Case of Sufi Shrines in Sri Lanka”

    On February 17, 2022, Dr. Shobhana Xavier delivered a SNID lecture entitled “Between Violence and Piety: The Case of Sufi Shrines in Sri Lanka”.

    The religious topography of Sri Lanka remains delicate in its post-war context, especially for ethno-linguistic and religious minority communities, such as Muslims. Amidst this precarity Sufis, Muslims with esoteric orientation towards Islam, resist their social and political marginalization through sacred spaces, such as Sufi shrines. However, these spaces oscillate between contestation and accommodation in the present climate of Islamophobia and Buddhist hegemony.

     

    • 43 min
    Activist Art: A Panel Discussion (Thursday Feb 3rd)

    Activist Art: A Panel Discussion (Thursday Feb 3rd)

    The panel featured in this episode brings together a group of Kingston/Katarokwi/Queen’s, Toronto and Calgary artists for a discussion of activism and the arts. In this conversation, we will discuss how social justice concerns shape their art and what forms activism takes in their practice. Panelists will share insights from their own projects, which engage in issues and themes including gender and resource extraction; prison abolitionism; the legacies of the G20. Also check http://shespreads.com/

    Panelists: Clare Preuss, Kemi King, Darwin Lyons, Zoe Sweet, Michael Wheeler, Mariah (Mo) Horner.

    Facilitation: Rebecca Hall

    • 1 hr 22 min